3

I have something like this:

<body>
    <div style="width:700px; margin:0 auto;">
        <div class="inner-div"></div>
    </div>
</body>

Is there a way to expand child div with class "inner-div", to 100% of body width?

2
  • 7
    Would that make any sense? Why would you want to have an inner div be potentially more than the outer div?
    – Aleks G
    Jul 13, 2012 at 14:09
  • I have horizontal centered navigation on my page, with sub navigation also horizontal and centered with same width. I'm putting second navigation in a div I wants to expand with 100% of body width.
    – Aleksiev
    Jul 13, 2012 at 14:20

8 Answers 8

7

This makes inner-div stretch from left to right:

div.inner-div {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
}
2
  • @ChrisMoschini that's because you added position: relative to the container in your example. Remove it and the inner div will stretch from left to right.
    – Stefan
    May 21, 2021 at 8:14
  • That's true, but many of the people landing here looking for this solution will be using, for example, Bootstrap, which is going to have at least one if not several position relative offset parents above the child tag they're trying to stretch. May 22, 2021 at 15:05
3

This is an old post but I found a better solution here: How can I expand a child div to 100% screen width if the container div is smaller?

So in this case it would be

.inner-div {
  width: 100vw;
  margin-left: calc(-50vw + 50%);
}

2
  • Kind of obvious but slightly less CSS (by 1 character) - change the calc to 50% - 50vw instead of starting with the negative. jsfiddle.net/b9chris/jxLue3hw/7 May 21, 2021 at 2:48
  • Annnnd if you can't stand horizontal scrollbars in any browser consider width: calc(100vw - 10px) May 21, 2021 at 2:58
1

I have not tested this but it might work:

You need jQuery for this.

//I'm using a resize event in case the body with changes. At least i think that will work.
window.onresize = function(event) {
    var bWidth = $("body").width():
    $(".inner-div").width(bWidth);
}
1

Not with css only. Since you set a with of 700px for the parent the child inherits this. But you can do this with javascript. Here with jquery:

$(window).bind("load resize", function(){
  $('.inner-div').width($('body').width());
});

It works even if you resize the window.

1
1

Let me correct this a little bit.

You also need to give your stretching element some "min-width" value in pixels/em and (not necessary but good practice) give the body element a min-width, too.

i.e.:

body {
  min-width: 1000px;
}

.outer {
  width: 1000px;
  height: 200px;
  margin: auto;
}

.inner {
  position: absolute;
  min-width: 1000px;
  height: 100px;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
}

If there is no min-width set and your HTML/CSS isn't built for a responsive site you can see an error at the inner DIV element when resizing the browser window. The property "width: 100%" makes the element stretch always to 100% browser window size. Therefore if the browser viewport gets smaller than the content and scrollbars appear, the inner DIV stays at the actual browser viewport size causing the appearance seems broken when you scroll the site.

You can try it here: http://jsfiddle.net/W4vum/

Try changing the "min-width" value at the ".inner" DIV in the example from 1000px to 100%, resize the window and scroll to the side, then you see it.

0

If you give width 100% to inner-div, it will fit the width of the outer div.

0

A little example of how to do it with css, so it is the same in javascript with setting the attributes I guess : http://jsfiddle.net/u8mJW/.

0

To make this work in pure CSS all parent elements have to be position:static; (or without the position attribute, because static is default)

after that you can use Stefan's code

div.inner-div {
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
}

(corrected Ricola3D's Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/u8mJW/23/ )

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.