147

I can't seem to find any python libraries that do multiple regression. The only things I find only do simple regression. I need to regress my dependent variable (y) against several independent variables (x1, x2, x3, etc.).

For example, with this data:

print 'y        x1      x2       x3       x4      x5     x6       x7'
for t in texts:
    print "{:>7.1f}{:>10.2f}{:>9.2f}{:>9.2f}{:>10.2f}{:>7.2f}{:>7.2f}{:>9.2f}" /
   .format(t.y,t.x1,t.x2,t.x3,t.x4,t.x5,t.x6,t.x7)

(output for above:)

      y        x1       x2       x3        x4     x5     x6       x7
   -6.0     -4.95    -5.87    -0.76     14.73   4.02   0.20     0.45
   -5.0     -4.55    -4.52    -0.71     13.74   4.47   0.16     0.50
  -10.0    -10.96   -11.64    -0.98     15.49   4.18   0.19     0.53
   -5.0     -1.08    -3.36     0.75     24.72   4.96   0.16     0.60
   -8.0     -6.52    -7.45    -0.86     16.59   4.29   0.10     0.48
   -3.0     -0.81    -2.36    -0.50     22.44   4.81   0.15     0.53
   -6.0     -7.01    -7.33    -0.33     13.93   4.32   0.21     0.50
   -8.0     -4.46    -7.65    -0.94     11.40   4.43   0.16     0.49
   -8.0    -11.54   -10.03    -1.03     18.18   4.28   0.21     0.55

How would I regress these in python, to get the linear regression formula:

Y = a1x1 + a2x2 + a3x3 + a4x4 + a5x5 + a6x6 + +a7x7 + c

3
  • not an expert, but if the variables are independent, can't you just run simple regression against each and sum the result? Jul 13, 2012 at 22:22
  • 10
    @HughBothwell You can't assume that the variables are independent though. In fact, if you're assuming that the variables are independent, you may potentially be modeling your data incorrectly. In other words, the responses Y may be correlated with each other, but assuming independence does not accurately model the dataset.
    – hlin117
    Mar 19, 2015 at 6:28
  • @HughBothwell sorry if this a dum question, but why does it matter if the raw feature variables x_i are independent or not? How does that affect the predictor (=model)? Aug 28, 2017 at 22:33

15 Answers 15

110

sklearn.linear_model.LinearRegression will do it:

from sklearn import linear_model
clf = linear_model.LinearRegression()
clf.fit([[getattr(t, 'x%d' % i) for i in range(1, 8)] for t in texts],
        [t.y for t in texts])

Then clf.coef_ will have the regression coefficients.

sklearn.linear_model also has similar interfaces to do various kinds of regularizations on the regression.

9
  • 2
    This returns an error with certain inputs. Any other solutions available?
    – Zach
    Jul 19, 2012 at 1:30
  • @Dougal can sklearn.linear_model.LinearRegression be used for weighted multivariate regression as well?
    – user961627
    May 1, 2014 at 15:43
  • 1
    To fit a constant term: clf = linear_model.LinearRegression(fit_intercept=True)
    – Imran
    Nov 30, 2014 at 16:36
  • 2
    Follow up, do you know how to get the confidence level using sklearn.linear_model.LinearRegression? Thanks. Mar 17, 2016 at 18:16
  • 1
    @HuanianZhang what do you mean by confidence level? If you want the coefficient of determination, the score method will do it; sklearn.metrics has some other model evaluation criteria. If you want the stuff like in Akavall's answer, statsmodels has some more R-like diagnostics.
    – Danica
    Mar 17, 2016 at 18:56
65

Here is a little work around that I created. I checked it with R and it works correct.

import numpy as np
import statsmodels.api as sm

y = [1,2,3,4,3,4,5,4,5,5,4,5,4,5,4,5,6,5,4,5,4,3,4]

x = [
     [4,2,3,4,5,4,5,6,7,4,8,9,8,8,6,6,5,5,5,5,5,5,5],
     [4,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,5,8,7,8,7,8,7,8,7,7,7,7,7,6,5],
     [4,1,2,5,6,7,8,9,7,8,7,8,7,7,7,7,7,7,6,6,4,4,4]
     ]

def reg_m(y, x):
    ones = np.ones(len(x[0]))
    X = sm.add_constant(np.column_stack((x[0], ones)))
    for ele in x[1:]:
        X = sm.add_constant(np.column_stack((ele, X)))
    results = sm.OLS(y, X).fit()
    return results

Result:

print reg_m(y, x).summary()

Output:

                            OLS Regression Results                            
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:                      y   R-squared:                       0.535
Model:                            OLS   Adj. R-squared:                  0.461
Method:                 Least Squares   F-statistic:                     7.281
Date:                Tue, 19 Feb 2013   Prob (F-statistic):            0.00191
Time:                        21:51:28   Log-Likelihood:                -26.025
No. Observations:                  23   AIC:                             60.05
Df Residuals:                      19   BIC:                             64.59
Df Model:                           3                                         
==============================================================================
                 coef    std err          t      P>|t|      [95.0% Conf. Int.]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
x1             0.2424      0.139      1.739      0.098        -0.049     0.534
x2             0.2360      0.149      1.587      0.129        -0.075     0.547
x3            -0.0618      0.145     -0.427      0.674        -0.365     0.241
const          1.5704      0.633      2.481      0.023         0.245     2.895

==============================================================================
Omnibus:                        6.904   Durbin-Watson:                   1.905
Prob(Omnibus):                  0.032   Jarque-Bera (JB):                4.708
Skew:                          -0.849   Prob(JB):                       0.0950
Kurtosis:                       4.426   Cond. No.                         38.6

pandas provides a convenient way to run OLS as given in this answer:

Run an OLS regression with Pandas Data Frame

5
  • 18
    The reg_m function is unnecessarily complicated. x = np.array(x).T, x = sm.add_constant(x) and results = sm.OLS(endog=y, exog=x).fit() is enough.
    – cd98
    Nov 14, 2014 at 23:26
  • 1
    This is a nice tool. Just ask one question: in this case, the t value is outside the 95.5% confidence interval, so it means this fitting is not accurate at all, or how do you explain this? Mar 17, 2016 at 18:18
  • 2
    Just noticed that your x1, x2, x3 are in reverse order in your original predictor list, i.e., x = [x3, x2, x1]?
    – sophiadw
    Apr 22, 2016 at 3:27
  • @sophiadw you can just add x = x[::-1] within function definition to get in right order Jul 9, 2018 at 11:54
  • @HuanianZhang "t value" is just how many standard deviations the coefficient is away from zero, while 95%CI is approximately coef +- 2 * std err (actually the Student-t distribution parameterized by degrees of freedom in the residuals). i.e. larger absolute t values imply CIs further from zero, but they shouldn't be directly compared. clarification is a bit late, but hope it's useful to somebody
    – Sam Mason
    Apr 26, 2019 at 15:58
55

Just to clarify, the example you gave is multiple linear regression, not multivariate linear regression refer. Difference:

The very simplest case of a single scalar predictor variable x and a single scalar response variable y is known as simple linear regression. The extension to multiple and/or vector-valued predictor variables (denoted with a capital X) is known as multiple linear regression, also known as multivariable linear regression. Nearly all real-world regression models involve multiple predictors, and basic descriptions of linear regression are often phrased in terms of the multiple regression model. Note, however, that in these cases the response variable y is still a scalar. Another term multivariate linear regression refers to cases where y is a vector, i.e., the same as general linear regression. The difference between multivariate linear regression and multivariable linear regression should be emphasized as it causes much confusion and misunderstanding in the literature.

In short:

  • multiple linear regression: the response y is a scalar.
  • multivariate linear regression: the response y is a vector.

(Another source.)

4
33

You can use numpy.linalg.lstsq:

import numpy as np

y = np.array([-6, -5, -10, -5, -8, -3, -6, -8, -8])
X = np.array(
    [
        [-4.95, -4.55, -10.96, -1.08, -6.52, -0.81, -7.01, -4.46, -11.54],
        [-5.87, -4.52, -11.64, -3.36, -7.45, -2.36, -7.33, -7.65, -10.03],
        [-0.76, -0.71, -0.98, 0.75, -0.86, -0.50, -0.33, -0.94, -1.03],
        [14.73, 13.74, 15.49, 24.72, 16.59, 22.44, 13.93, 11.40, 18.18],
        [4.02, 4.47, 4.18, 4.96, 4.29, 4.81, 4.32, 4.43, 4.28],
        [0.20, 0.16, 0.19, 0.16, 0.10, 0.15, 0.21, 0.16, 0.21],
        [0.45, 0.50, 0.53, 0.60, 0.48, 0.53, 0.50, 0.49, 0.55],
    ]
)
X = X.T  # transpose so input vectors are along the rows
X = np.c_[X, np.ones(X.shape[0])]  # add bias term
beta_hat = np.linalg.lstsq(X, y, rcond=None)[0]
print(beta_hat)

Result:

[ -0.49104607   0.83271938   0.0860167    0.1326091    6.85681762  22.98163883 -41.08437805 -19.08085066]

You can see the estimated output with:

print(np.dot(X,beta_hat))

Result:

[ -5.97751163,  -5.06465759, -10.16873217,  -4.96959788,  -7.96356915,  -3.06176313,  -6.01818435,  -7.90878145,  -7.86720264]
1
  • may i know what is difference between print np.dot(X,beta_hat)... and mod_wls = sm.WLS(y, X, weights=weights) res = mod_wls.fit() predsY=res.predict() they all return the Y result
    – dd90p
    Dec 14, 2016 at 8:42
13

Use scipy.optimize.curve_fit. And not only for linear fit.

from scipy.optimize import curve_fit
import scipy

def fn(x, a, b, c):
    return a + b*x[0] + c*x[1]

# y(x0,x1) data:
#    x0=0 1 2
# ___________
# x1=0 |0 1 2
# x1=1 |1 2 3
# x1=2 |2 3 4

x = scipy.array([[0,1,2,0,1,2,0,1,2,],[0,0,0,1,1,1,2,2,2]])
y = scipy.array([0,1,2,1,2,3,2,3,4])
popt, pcov = curve_fit(fn, x, y)
print popt
10

Once you convert your data to a pandas dataframe (df),

import statsmodels.formula.api as smf
lm = smf.ols(formula='y ~ x1 + x2 + x3 + x4 + x5 + x6 + x7', data=df).fit()
print(lm.params)

The intercept term is included by default.

See this notebook for more examples.

3
  • 1
    This notebook is awesome. it shows how to regress multiple independent variables (x1,x2,x3...) on Y with just 3 lines of code and using scikit learn.
    – jxn
    Aug 28, 2016 at 23:19
  • @canary_in_the_data_mine thanks for the notebook. how can i plot linear regression which has multiple features? I couldn't find in the notebook. any pointers will be greatly appreciated. -- Thanks May 15, 2018 at 7:51
  • Does it add the intercept because we have to add the intercept by passing smf.add_intercept() as a parameter to ols()
    – bluedroid
    Jan 18, 2019 at 16:36
4

I think this may the most easy way to finish this work:

from random import random
from pandas import DataFrame
from statsmodels.api import OLS
lr = lambda : [random() for i in range(100)]
x = DataFrame({'x1': lr(), 'x2':lr(), 'x3':lr()})
x['b'] = 1
y = x.x1 + x.x2 * 2 + x.x3 * 3 + 4

print x.head()

         x1        x2        x3  b
0  0.433681  0.946723  0.103422  1
1  0.400423  0.527179  0.131674  1
2  0.992441  0.900678  0.360140  1
3  0.413757  0.099319  0.825181  1
4  0.796491  0.862593  0.193554  1

print y.head()

0    6.637392
1    5.849802
2    7.874218
3    7.087938
4    7.102337
dtype: float64

model = OLS(y, x)
result = model.fit()
print result.summary()

                            OLS Regression Results                            
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:                      y   R-squared:                       1.000
Model:                            OLS   Adj. R-squared:                  1.000
Method:                 Least Squares   F-statistic:                 5.859e+30
Date:                Wed, 09 Dec 2015   Prob (F-statistic):               0.00
Time:                        15:17:32   Log-Likelihood:                 3224.9
No. Observations:                 100   AIC:                            -6442.
Df Residuals:                      96   BIC:                            -6431.
Df Model:                           3                                         
Covariance Type:            nonrobust                                         
==============================================================================
                 coef    std err          t      P>|t|      [95.0% Conf. Int.]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
x1             1.0000   8.98e-16   1.11e+15      0.000         1.000     1.000
x2             2.0000   8.28e-16   2.41e+15      0.000         2.000     2.000
x3             3.0000   8.34e-16    3.6e+15      0.000         3.000     3.000
b              4.0000   8.51e-16    4.7e+15      0.000         4.000     4.000
==============================================================================
Omnibus:                        7.675   Durbin-Watson:                   1.614
Prob(Omnibus):                  0.022   Jarque-Bera (JB):                3.118
Skew:                           0.045   Prob(JB):                        0.210
Kurtosis:                       2.140   Cond. No.                         6.89
==============================================================================
4

Multiple Linear Regression can be handled using the sklearn library as referenced above. I'm using the Anaconda install of Python 3.6.

Create your model as follows:

from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression
regressor = LinearRegression()
regressor.fit(X, y)

# display coefficients
print(regressor.coef_)
3

You can use numpy.linalg.lstsq

1
  • 6
    How can you use this to get the coefficents of a multivariate regression? I only see how to do a simple regression... and don't see how to get the coefficents..
    – Zach
    Jul 19, 2012 at 2:37
1

You can use the function below and pass it a DataFrame:

def linear(x, y=None, show=True):
    """
    @param x: pd.DataFrame
    @param y: pd.DataFrame or pd.Series or None
              if None, then use last column of x as y
    @param show: if show regression summary
    """
    import statsmodels.api as sm

    xy = sm.add_constant(x if y is None else pd.concat([x, y], axis=1))
    res = sm.OLS(xy.ix[:, -1], xy.ix[:, :-1], missing='drop').fit()

    if show: print res.summary()
    return res
1

Scikit-learn is a machine learning library for Python which can do this job for you. Just import sklearn.linear_model module into your script.

Find the code template for Multiple Linear Regression using sklearn in Python:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt #to plot visualizations
import pandas as pd

# Importing the dataset
df = pd.read_csv(<Your-dataset-path>)
# Assigning feature and target variables
X = df.iloc[:,:-1]
y = df.iloc[:,-1]

# Use label encoders, if you have any categorical variable
from sklearn.preprocessing import LabelEncoder
labelencoder = LabelEncoder()
X['<column-name>'] = labelencoder.fit_transform(X['<column-name>'])

from sklearn.preprocessing import OneHotEncoder
onehotencoder = OneHotEncoder(categorical_features = ['<index-value>'])
X = onehotencoder.fit_transform(X).toarray()

# Avoiding the dummy variable trap
X = X[:,1:] # Usually done by the algorithm itself

#Spliting the data into test and train set
from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split
X_train, X_test, y_train, y_test = train_test_split(X,y, random_state = 0, test_size = 0.2)

# Fitting the model
from sklearn.linear_model import LinearRegression
regressor = LinearRegression()
regressor.fit(X_train, y_train)

# Predicting the test set results
y_pred = regressor.predict(X_test)

That's it. You can use this code as a template for implementing Multiple Linear Regression in any dataset. For a better understanding with an example, Visit: Linear Regression with an example

0

Here is an alternative and basic method:

from patsy import dmatrices
import statsmodels.api as sm

y,x = dmatrices("y_data ~ x_1 + x_2 ", data = my_data)
### y_data is the name of the dependent variable in your data ### 
model_fit = sm.OLS(y,x)
results = model_fit.fit()
print(results.summary())

Instead of sm.OLS you can also use sm.Logit or sm.Probit and etc.

0

Finding a linear model such as this one can be handled with OpenTURNS.

In OpenTURNS this is done with the LinearModelAlgorithmclass which creates a linear model from numerical samples. To be more specific, it builds the following linear model :

Y = a0 + a1.X1 + ... + an.Xn + epsilon,

where the error epsilon is gaussian with zero mean and unit variance. Assuming your data is in a csv file, here is a simple script to get the regression coefficients ai :

from __future__ import print_function
import pandas as pd
import openturns as ot

# Assuming the data is a csv file with the given structure                          
# Y X1 X2 .. X7
df = pd.read_csv("./data.csv", sep="\s+")

# Build a sample from the pandas dataframe
sample = ot.Sample(df.values)

# The observation points are in the first column (dimension 1)
Y = sample[:, 0]

# The input vector (X1,..,X7) of dimension 7
X = sample[:, 1::]

# Build a Linear model approximation
result = ot.LinearModelAlgorithm(X, Y).getResult()

# Get the coefficients ai
print("coefficients of the linear regression model = ", result.getCoefficients())

You can then easily get the confidence intervals with the following call :

# Get the confidence intervals at 90% of the ai coefficients
print(
    "confidence intervals of the coefficients = ",
    ot.LinearModelAnalysis(result).getCoefficientsConfidenceInterval(0.9),
)

You may find a more detailed example in the OpenTURNS examples.

0

try a generalized linear model with a gaussian family

y = np.array([-6, -5, -10, -5, -8, -3, -6, -8, -8])
X = np.array([
    [-4.95, -4.55, -10.96, -1.08, -6.52, -0.81, -7.01, -4.46, -11.54],
    [-5.87, -4.52, -11.64, -3.36, -7.45, -2.36, -7.33, -7.65, -10.03],
    [-0.76, -0.71, -0.98, 0.75, -0.86, -0.50, -0.33, -0.94, -1.03],
    [14.73, 13.74, 15.49, 24.72, 16.59, 22.44, 13.93, 11.40, 18.18],
    [4.02, 4.47, 4.18, 4.96, 4.29, 4.81, 4.32, 4.43, 4.28],
    [0.20, 0.16, 0.19, 0.16, 0.10, 0.15, 0.21, 0.16, 0.21],
    [0.45, 0.50, 0.53, 0.60, 0.48, 0.53, 0.50, 0.49, 0.55],
])
X=zip(*reversed(X))

df=pd.DataFrame({'X':X,'y':y})
columns=7
for i in range(0,columns):
    df['X'+str(i)]=df.apply(lambda row: row['X'][i],axis=1)

df=df.drop('X',axis=1)
print(df)


#model_formula='y ~ X0+X1+X2+X3+X4+X5+X6'
model_formula='y ~ X0'

model_family = sm.families.Gaussian()
model_fit = glm(formula = model_formula, 
             data = df, 
             family = model_family).fit()

print(model_fit.summary())

# Extract coefficients from the fitted model wells_fit
#print(model_fit.params)
intercept, slope = model_fit.params

# Print coefficients
print('Intercept =', intercept)
print('Slope =', slope)

# Extract and print confidence intervals
print(model_fit.conf_int())

df2=pd.DataFrame()
df2['X0']=np.linspace(0.50,0.70,50)

df3=pd.DataFrame()
df3['X1']=np.linspace(0.20,0.60,50)

prediction0=model_fit.predict(df2)
#prediction1=model_fit.predict(df3)

plt.plot(df2['X0'],prediction0,label='X0')
plt.ylabel("y")
plt.xlabel("X0")
plt.show()
-2

Linear Regression is a good example for start to Artificial Intelligence

Here is a good example for Machine Learning Algorithm of Multiple Linear Regression using Python:

##### Predicting House Prices Using Multiple Linear Regression - @Y_T_Akademi
    
#### In this project we are gonna see how machine learning algorithms help us predict house prices. Linear Regression is a model of predicting new future data by using the existing correlation between the old data. Here, machine learning helps us identify this relationship between feature data and output, so we can predict future values.

import pandas as pd

##### we use sklearn library in many machine learning calculations..

from sklearn import linear_model

##### we import out dataset: housepricesdataset.csv

df = pd.read_csv("housepricesdataset.csv",sep = ";")

##### The following is our feature set:
##### The following is the output(result) data:
##### we define a linear regression model here: 

reg = linear_model.LinearRegression()
reg.fit(df[['area', 'roomcount', 'buildingage']], df['price'])

# Since our model is ready, we can make predictions now:
# lets predict a house with 230 square meters, 4 rooms and 10 years old building..

reg.predict([[230,4,10]])

# Now lets predict a house with 230 square meters, 6 rooms and 0 years old building - its new building..
reg.predict([[230,6,0]])

# Now lets predict a house with 355 square meters, 3 rooms and 20 years old building 
reg.predict([[355,3,20]])

# You can make as many prediction as you want.. 
reg.predict([[230,4,10], [230,6,0], [355,3,20], [275, 5, 17]])

And my dataset is below:

enter image description here

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