9

I have the following:

public class Interval
{
   DateTime Start;
   DateTime End; 
}

I have a List<Interval> object containing multiple intervals. I am trying to achieve the following (I used numbers to make it easy to understand):

[(1, 5), (2, 4), (3, 6)] --->  [(1,6)]
[(1, 3), (2, 4), (5, 8)] --->  [(1, 4), (5,8)]

I currently do this in Python as follows:

def merge(times):
    saved = list(times[0])
    for st, en in sorted([sorted(t) for t in times]):
        if st <= saved[1]:
            saved[1] = max(saved[1], en)
        else:
            yield tuple(saved)
            saved[0] = st
            saved[1] = en
    yield tuple(saved)

but am trying to achieve the same in C# (LINQ would be best but optional). Any suggestions on how to do this efficiently?

  • For a given Interval, do you ensure that (Start < End) is always true? – Andre Calil Jul 14 '12 at 1:07
  • @AndreCalil: Yeap. I can ensure that condition. – Legend Jul 14 '12 at 1:20
  • Are the intervals always sorted in the original list? – Paul Phillips Jul 14 '12 at 1:27
  • Nopes. But I guess I can achieve that using OrderBy on the List. – Legend Jul 14 '12 at 1:41
12

Here's a version using yield return - I find it easier to read than doing an Aggregate query, although it's still lazy evaluated. This assumes you've ordered the list already, if not, just add that step.

IEnumerable<Interval> MergeOverlappingIntervals(IEnumerable<Interval> intervals)
{
  var accumulator = intervals.First();  
  intervals = intervals.Skip(1);

  foreach(var interval in intervals)
  {
    if ( interval.Start <= accumulator.End )
    {
        accumulator = Combine(accumulator, interval);
    }
    else
    {
        yield return accumulator;
        accumulator = interval;     
    }       
  }

  yield return accumulator;
}

Interval  Combine(Interval start, Interval end)
{
  return new Interval 
  {
    Start = start.Start,
    End = Max(start.End, end.End),
  };
}

private static DateTime Max(DateTime left, DateTime right) 
{
    return (left > right) ? left : right;
}
  • This is a very good use of yield return. +1! – Enigmativity Jul 15 '12 at 6:15
  • 1
    I think this solution is not correct. When combining you should take the bigger End of interval and accumulator. – yper Apr 23 '14 at 12:09
  • I'm not sure what you mean. Could you show an example case where this produces a wrong answer? – Paul Phillips Apr 23 '14 at 13:10
  • Ah, I see. [(1, 5), (2, 4)] returns [(1,4)] - which is clearly wrong. If you want to edit in the fix that would be fine with me, or I'll get to it later. – Paul Phillips Apr 23 '14 at 13:18
  • 1
    Crashes on count = 0? – shannon Mar 17 '15 at 9:03
4

This may not be the prettiest solution, but it may work as well

public static List<Interval> Merge(List<Interval> intervals)
{
    var mergedIntervals = new List<Interval>();
    var orderedIntervals = intervals.OrderBy<Interval, DateTime>(x => x.Start).ToList<Interval>();

    DateTime start = orderedIntervals.First().Start;
    DateTime end = orderedIntervals.First().End;

    Interval currentInterval;
    for (int i = 1; i < orderedIntervals.Count; i++)
    {
        currentInterval = orderedIntervals[i];

        if (currentInterval.Start < end)
        {
            end = currentInterval.End;
        }
        else
        {
            mergedIntervals.Add(new Interval()
            {
                Start = start,
                End = end
            });

            start = currentInterval.Start;
            end = currentInterval.End;
        }
    }

    mergedIntervals.Add(new Interval()
                {
                    Start = start,
                    End = end
                });

    return mergedIntervals;
}

Any feedback will be appreciated.

Regards

  • That's a good general idea. I noticed one bug, though. It won't return the last merged interval. – Risky Martin Jul 14 '12 at 2:18
  • @RiskyMartin you are right, I've updated the code – Andre Calil Jul 14 '12 at 2:25
  • I am unable to find any cases where this fails to work. – SixOThree Dec 1 '15 at 17:08
  • @SixOThree thanks for the feedback! – Andre Calil Dec 1 '15 at 19:36
  • I know this is old code, but in case anyone stumbles across it and uses it in preference to the IEnumerable variant the following lines should read (otherwise it will collapse a merged interval containing a shorter one): if (currentInterval.Start < end) { end = (end > currentInterval.End ? end : currentInterval.End); } – Rexx Magnus Jun 12 '18 at 15:51
2

I was beset by "Not Created Here" syndrome tonight, so here's mine. Using an Enumerator directly saved me a couple lines of code, made it clearer (IMO), and handled the case with no records. I suppose it might run a smidge faster as well if you care about that...

public IEnumerable<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>> Merge(IEnumerable<Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>> ranges)
{
    DateTime extentStart, extentEnd;
    using (var enumerator = ranges.OrderBy(r => r.Item1).GetEnumerator()) {
        bool recordsRemain = enumerator.MoveNext();
        while (recordsRemain)
        {
            extentStart = enumerator.Current.Item1;
            extentEnd = enumerator.Current.Item2;
            while ((recordsRemain = enumerator.MoveNext()) && enumerator.Current.Item1 < extentEnd)
            {
                if (enumerator.Current.Item2 > extentEnd)
                {
                    extentEnd = enumerator.Current.Item2;
                }
            }
            yield return Tuple.Create(extentStart, extentEnd);
        }
    }
}

In my own implementation, I use a TimeRange type to store each Tuple<DateTime, DateTime>, as other here do. I didn't include that here simply to stay focused / on-topic.

1

This kind of merging would typically be considered as a fold in functional languages. The LINQ equivalent is Aggregate.

IEnumerable<Interval<T>> Merge<T>(IEnumerable<Interval<T>> intervals) 
  where T : IComparable<T>
{
    //error check parameters
    var ret = new List<Interval<T>>(intervals);
    int lastCount
    do
    {
        lastCount = ret.Count;
        ret = ret.Aggregate(new List<Interval<T>>(),
                    (agg, cur) =>
                    {
                        for (int i = 0; i < agg.Count; i++)
                        {
                            var a = agg[i];
                            if (a.Contains(cur.Start))
                            {
                                if (a.End.CompareTo(cur.End) <= 0)
                                {
                                    agg[i] = new Interval<T>(a.Start, cur.End);
                                }
                                return agg;
                            }
                            else if (a.Contains(cur.End))
                            {
                                if (a.Start.CompareTo(cur.Start) >= 0)
                                {
                                    agg[i] = new Interval<T>(cur.Start, a.End);
                                }
                                return agg;
                            }
                        }
                        agg.Add(cur);
                        return agg;
                    });
    } while (ret.Count != lastCount);
    return ret;
}

I made the Interval class generic (Interval<T> where T : IComparable<T>), added a bool Contains(T value) method, and made it immutable, but you should not need to change it much if you want to use the class definition as you have it now.

0

I used TimeRange as a container storing the ranges:

public class TimeRange
{
    public TimeRange(DateTime s, DateTime e) { start = s;  end = e; }

    public DateTime start;
    public DateTime end;
}

It divides the problem in combining two time ranges. Therefor, the current time range (work) is matched with the time ranges previously merged. If one of the previously added time ranges is outdated, it is dropped and the new time range (combined from work and the matching time range) is used. The cases I figured out for two ranges () and [] are as follows:

  1. [] ()
  2. ([])
  3. [(])
  4. [()]
  5. ([)]
  6. ()[]

    public static IEnumerable<TimeRange> Merge(IEnumerable<TimeRange> timeRanges)
    {
        List<TimeRange> mergedData = new List<TimeRange>();
    
        foreach (var work in timeRanges)
        {
            Debug.Assert(work.start <= work.end, "start date has to be smaller or equal to end date to be a valid TimeRange");
            var tr = new TimeRange(work.start, work.end);
    
            int idx = -1;
            for (int i = 0; i < mergedData.Count; i++)
            {
                if (tr.start < mergedData[i].start)
                {
                    if (tr.end < mergedData[i].start)
                        continue;
                    if (tr.end < mergedData[i].end)
                        tr.end = mergedData[i].end;
                }
                else if (tr.start < mergedData[i].end)
                {
                    tr.start = mergedData[i].start;
    
                    if (tr.end < mergedData[i].end)
                        tr.end = mergedData[i].end;
                }
                else
                    continue;
    
                idx = i;
                mergedData.RemoveAt(i);
                i--;
            }
    
            if (idx < 0)
                idx = mergedData.Count;
    
            mergedData.Insert(idx, tr);
        }
    
        return mergedData;
    }
    

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.