91

This question already has an answer here:

I am running an event loop of the following form:

var i;
var j = 10;
for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {

    asynchronousProcess(callbackFunction() {
        alert(i);
    });
}

I am trying to display a series of alerts showing the numbers 0 through 10. The problem is that by the time the callback function is triggered, the loop has already gone through a few iterations and it displays a higher value of i. Any recommendations on how to fix this?

marked as duplicate by Cerbrus javascript Aug 23 '18 at 10:20

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • How about adding the i parameter to the asynchronousProcess function? Which can pass it on to the callbackFunction – Simon Forsberg Jul 14 '12 at 23:00
163

The for loop runs immediately to completion while all your asynchronous operations are started. When they complete some time in the future and call their callbacks, the value of your loop index variable i will be at its last value for all the callbacks.

This is because the for loop does not wait for an asynchronous operation to complete before continuing on to the next iteration of the loop and because the async callbacks are called some time in the future. Thus, the loop completes its iterations and THEN the callbacks get called when those async operations finish. As such, the loop index is "done" and sitting at its final value for all the callbacks.

To work around this, you have to uniquely save the loop index separately for each callback. In Javascript, the way to do that is to capture it in a function closure. That can either be done be creating an inline function closure specifically for this purpose (first example shown below) or you can create an external function that you pass the index to and let it maintain the index uniquely for you (second example shown below).

As of 2016, if you have a fully up-to-spec ES6 implementation of Javascript, you can also use let to define the for loop variable and it will be uniquely defined for each iteration of the for loop (third implementation below). But, note this is a late implementation feature in ES6 implementations so you have to make sure your execution environment supports that option.

Use .forEach() to iterate since it creates its own function closure

someArray.forEach(function(item, i) {
    asynchronousProcess(function(item) {
        console.log(i);
    });
});

Create Your Own Function Closure Using an IIFE

var j = 10;
for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    (function(cntr) {
        // here the value of i was passed into as the argument cntr
        // and will be captured in this function closure so each
        // iteration of the loop can have it's own value
        asynchronousProcess(function() {
            console.log(cntr);
        });
    })(i);
}

Create or Modify External Function and Pass it the Variable

If you can modify the asynchronousProcess() function, then you could just pass the value in there and have the asynchronousProcess() function the cntr back to the callback like this:

var j = 10;
for (var i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    asynchronousProcess(i, function(cntr) {
        console.log(cntr);
    });
}

Use ES6 let

If you have a Javascript execution environment that fully supports ES6, you can use let in your for loop like this:

const j = 10;
for (let i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    asynchronousProcess(function() {
        console.log(i);
    });
}

let declared in a for loop declaration like this will create a unique value of i for each invocation of the loop (which is what you want).

Serializing with promises and async/await

If your async function returns a promise, and you want to serialize your async operations to run one after another instead of in parallel and you're running in a modern environment that supports async and await, then you have more options.

async function someFunction() {
    const j = 10;
    for (let i = 0; i < j; i++) {
        // wait for the promise to resolve before advancing the for loop
        await asynchronousProcess();
        console.log(i);
    }
}

This will make sure that only one call to asynchronousProcess() is in flight at a time and the for loop won't even advance until each one is done. This is different than the previous schemes that all ran your asynchronous operations in parallel so it depends entirely upon which design you want. Note: await works with a promise so your function has to return a promise that is resolved/rejected when the asynchronous operation is complete. Also, note that in order to use await, the containing function must be declared async.

  • 1
    Added second option if you can modify the asycronouseProcess() function. – jfriend00 Jul 14 '12 at 23:41
  • Awesome! This helped me a lot with CasperJS. – Manu Feb 16 '15 at 23:05
  • Added ES6 let implementation. – jfriend00 Sep 16 '16 at 18:03
  • 1
    Would it be wrong to increment a counter and then check if it equals j inside the asynchronous function? – Jake 1986 Jun 30 '17 at 14:13
  • @Jake1986 - It depends upon what you're trying to do and how the code is written. I can't really tell from your brief comment. If you want, you can ask your own question and show the code you're asking about. – jfriend00 Jun 30 '17 at 20:51
10

Any recommendation on how to fix this?

Several. You can use bind:

for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    asycronouseProcess(function (i) {
        alert(i);
    }.bind(null, i));
}

Or, if your browser supports let (it will be in the next ECMAScript version, however Firefox already supports it since a while) you could have:

for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    let k = i;
    asycronouseProcess(function() {
        alert(k);
    });
}

Or, you could do the job of bind manually (in case the browser doesn't support it, but I would say you can implement a shim in that case, it should be in the link above):

for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    asycronouseProcess(function(i) {
        return function () {
            alert(i)
        }
    }(i));
}

I usually prefer let when I can use it (e.g. for Firefox add-on); otherwise bind or a custom currying function (that doesn't need a context object).

  • The ECMAScript example is a very good one to demonstrate what let can do. – hazelnut Jan 14 '16 at 4:00
  • Is asyncronouseProcess in all the answers some kind of placeholder? I'm getting "not defined". – JackHasaKeyboard Nov 19 '17 at 23:47
  • The asyncronouseProcess is part of the original question, so yeah, it's normal if it gives to you "not defined". You can just replace it with any async function if you want to check the original issue and how the proposed solution works. For example: function asycronouseProcess(fn){ setTimeout(fn, 100);} – ZER0 Nov 21 '17 at 21:18
8

async await is here (ES7), so you can do this kind of things very easily now.

  var i;
  var j = 10;
  for (i = 0; i < j; i++) {
    await asycronouseProcess();
    alert(i);
  }

Remember, this works only if asycronouseProcess is returning a Promise

If asycronouseProcess is not in your control then you can make it return a Promise by yourself like this

function asyncProcess() {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    asycronouseProcess(()=>{
      resolve();
    })
  })
}

Then replace this line await asycronouseProcess(); by await asyncProcess();

Understanding Promises before even looking into async await is must (Also read about support for async await)

1

var i = 0;
var length = 10;

function for1() {
  console.log(i);
  for2();
}

function for2() {
  if (i == length) {
    return false;
  }
  setTimeout(function() {
    i++;
    for1();
  }, 500);
}
for1();

Here is a sample functional approach to what is expected here.

0

JavaScript code runs on a single thread, so you cannot principally block to wait for the first loop iteration to complete before beginning the next without seriously impacting page usability.

The solution depends on what you really need. If the example is close to exactly what you need, @Simon's suggestion to pass i to your async process is a good one.

0

ES2017: You can wrap the async code inside a function(say XHRPost) returning a promise( Async code inside the promise).

Then call the function(XHRPost) inside the for loop but with the magical Await keyword. :)

let http = new XMLHttpRequest();
let url = 'http://sumersin/forum.social.json';

function XHRpost(i) {
  return new Promise(function(resolve) {
    let params = 'id=nobot&%3Aoperation=social%3AcreateForumPost&subject=Demo' + i + '&message=Here%20is%20the%20Demo&_charset_=UTF-8';
    http.open('POST', url, true);
    http.setRequestHeader('Content-type', 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded');
    http.onreadystatechange = function() {
    console.log("Done " + i + "<<<<>>>>>" + http.readyState);
          if(http.readyState == 4){
              console.log('SUCCESS :',i);
              resolve();
          }
         }
    http.send(params);       
    });
 }
 
(async () => {
    for (let i = 1; i < 5; i++) {
        await XHRpost(i);
       }
})();

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.