241

If the HTML has elements like this:

id="product42"
id="product43"
...

How do I match all of those id's starting with "product"?

I've seen answers that do this exactly using javascript, but how to do it with only CSS?

434
[id^=product]

^= indicates "starts with". Conversely, $= indicates "ends with".

The symbols are actually borrowed from Regex syntax, where ^ and $ mean "start of string" and "end of string" respectively.

See the specs for full information.

6
  • 1
    Thanks for the method and explanation, I've edited my question so its more clear. Out of curiosity, is there a way to match a string inside of the id's string?
    – abc123
    Jul 16 '12 at 14:12
  • See the specs, they explain it better than I could! Jul 16 '12 at 14:41
  • @itamar: I appreciate your attempt at editing my answer, but quote are only required if the value contains characters that are not a valid identifier. product is clearly a valid identifier, and therefore needs no quotes. Sep 6 '13 at 23:18
  • The specificity of this type of selector is very low
    – nuander
    Sep 3 '15 at 21:24
  • 4
    @Emerald214 :not([id^=product]) Sep 7 '15 at 16:17
73

I'd do it like this:

[id^="product"] {
  ...
}

Ideally, use a class. This is what classes are for:

<div id="product176" class="product"></div>
<div id="product177" class="product"></div>
<div id="product178" class="product"></div>

And now the selector becomes:

.product {
  ...
}
1
  • 1
    @Blender, thanks, I chose the other answer because it explains a bit more to me and understand the symbols being used. I can't use classes for this scenario, otherwise, yes it would be nicer.
    – abc123
    Jul 16 '12 at 14:14
6

Use the attribute selector

[id^=product]{property:value}
2

I want to share this solution too, maybe in the future it could help someone.
As the others said you can write [id^=product] for id

But we can give an example for the class as well: [class^="product-"] which indicates classes starts with product and also * like this [class*="product-"]

This is a simple example :

/* Icons */
[class^="icon-"], [class*=" icon-"] {
  /* use !important to prevent issues with browser extensions that change fonts */
  font-family: 'mk-font' !important;
  font-size: 3em;
}

good luck ...

-1

I noticed that there is another CSS selector that does the same thing . The syntax is as follows :

[id|="name_id"]

This will select all elements ID which begins with the word enclosed in double quotes.

3
  • How did you notice? reference?
    – Ben Bozorg
    Aug 25 '17 at 1:16
  • Doc for this here : w3.org/TR/selectors-3/#attribute-selectors This should select all id which start or equal to "name_id" Apr 11 '19 at 6:22
  • att|=val is NOT the same as att^=val. From the reference mentioned : The |= selector "Represents an element with the att attribute, its value either being exactly "val" or beginning with "val" immediately followed by "-". " So an id like "product42" would not be matched by |=, but "product-42" would.
    – Goozak
    Jan 10 '20 at 15:36

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