54

How do I add two numbers without using ++ or + or any other arithmetic operator?

It was a question asked a long time ago in some campus interview. Anyway, today someone asked a question regarding some bit-manipulations, and in answers a beautiful quide Stanford bit twiddling was referred. I spend some time studying it and thought that there actually might be an answer to the question. I don't know, I could not find one. Does an answer exist?

0

21 Answers 21

99

This is something I have written a while ago for fun. It uses a two's complement representation and implements addition using repeated shifts with a carry bit, implementing other operators mostly in terms of addition.

#include <stdlib.h> /* atoi() */
#include <stdio.h>  /* (f)printf */
#include <assert.h> /* assert() */

int add(int x, int y) {
    int carry = 0;
    int result = 0;
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i < 32; ++i) {
        int a = (x >> i) & 1;
        int b = (y >> i) & 1;
        result |= ((a ^ b) ^ carry) << i;
        carry = (a & b) | (b & carry) | (carry & a);
    }

    return result;
}

int negate(int x) {
    return add(~x, 1);
}

int subtract(int x, int y) {
    return add(x, negate(y));
}

int is_even(int n) {
    return !(n & 1);
}

int divide_by_two(int n) {
    return n >> 1;
}

int multiply_by_two(int n) {
    return n << 1;
}

int multiply(int x, int y) {
    int result = 0;

    if(x < 0 && y < 0) {
        return multiply(negate(x), negate(y));
    }

    if(x >= 0 && y < 0) {
        return multiply(y, x);
    }

    while(y > 0) {
        if(is_even(y)) {
            x = multiply_by_two(x);
            y = divide_by_two(y);
        } else {
            result = add(result, x);
            y = add(y, -1);
        }
    }

    return result;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int from = -100, to = 100;
    int i, j;

    for(i = from; i <= to; ++i) {
        assert(0 - i == negate(i));
        assert(((i % 2) == 0) == is_even(i));
        assert(i * 2 == multiply_by_two(i));
        if(is_even(i)) {
            assert(i / 2 == divide_by_two(i));
        }
    }

    for(i = from; i <= to; ++i) {
        for(j = from; j <= to; ++j) {
            assert(i + j == add(i, j));
            assert(i - j == subtract(i, j));
            assert(i * j == multiply(i, j));
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
9
  • 6
    +1 Wow, that's insane dude! I thought about this type of thing while I was taking Digital design, but never actually wrote code for it! – NoMoreZealots Jul 19 '09 at 16:16
  • 11
    Of course you'll need to unroll the loop to get rid of incrementing index :) – Eugene Jul 19 '09 at 19:38
  • @Eugene: haha, good point. Obviously it's not a 100% pure implementation...there's probably some clever way to re-write it without incrementing an index. Also, in multiply, I use some comparison operators, which might be considered cheating, although due to the fact that I'm basically just checking for negative values, those would be pretty trivial to translate to bit-frobbing. – Jason Creighton Jul 20 '09 at 4:58
  • 8
    No need to unroll. Just turn the for loop into a while loop based on a bit-shift that yields zero at the appropriate moment. – Don Roby Feb 18 '10 at 2:14
  • 1
    For portability you should switch from int to unsigned. – R.. GitHub STOP HELPING ICE Jan 21 '11 at 7:18
53

Or, rather than Jason's bitwise approach, you can calculate many bits in parallel - this should run much faster with large numbers. In each step figure out the carry part and the part that is sum. You attempt to add the carry to the sum, which could cause carry again - hence the loop.

>>> def add(a, b):
    while a != 0:
        #      v carry portion| v sum portion
        a, b = ((a & b) << 1),  (a ^ b)
        print b, a
    return b

when you add 1 and 3, both numbers have the 1 bit set, so the sum of that 1+1 carries. The next step you add 2 to 2 and that carries into the correct sum four. That causes an exit

>>> add(1,3)
2 2
4 0
4

Or a more complex example

>>> add(45, 291)
66 270
4 332
8 328
16 320
336

Edit: For it to work easily on signed numbers you need to introduce an upper limit on a and b

>>> def add(a, b):
    while a != 0:
        #      v carry portion| v sum portion
        a, b = ((a & b) << 1),  (a ^ b)
        a &= 0xFFFFFFFF
        b &= 0xFFFFFFFF
        print b, a
    return b

Try it on

add(-1, 1)

to see a single bit carry up through the entire range and overflow over 32 iterations

4294967294 2
4294967292 4
4294967288 8
...
4294901760 65536
...
2147483648 2147483648
0 0
0L
8
  • +1 Much more elegant and efficient than mine. Also removes the need for an incrementing index variable and the need to know how wide the "int" type on your system is. – Jason Creighton Jul 20 '09 at 15:25
  • +1 assuming that this really works. But it looks beautiful :') – Thomas Nov 24 '09 at 10:39
  • 2
    @ForceMagic - Don't be silly! Of course + is faster than my logic here. + Uses hardware built into the CPU and uses one CPU instruction rather than a whole bunch for my Python loop. – Tom Leys Nov 26 '12 at 23:51
  • 1
    @ForceMagic If this version were somehow faster than operator+, then the compiler writers would just implement operator+ in terms of this – David Stone Aug 24 '13 at 17:14
  • 1
    If I add two negative numbers, then the answer is not correct. It gave me a large positive integer. – nos Jul 6 '16 at 1:32
21
int Add(int a, int b)
{
    while (b)
    {
        int carry = a & b;
        a = a ^ b;
        b = carry << 1;
    }
    return a;
}
2
  • Amazingly, this can be ported to JavaScript in less than 5 seconds. function Add(a, b) { while (b) { var carry = a & b; a = a ^ b; b = carry << 1; } return a; } – user900360 May 24 '13 at 10:17
  • 1
    So could you explain what you did? step by step if possible. Thanks! – erol yeniaras Jun 30 '16 at 22:22
18

You could transform an adder circuit into an algorithm. They only do bitwise operations =)

8

Well, to implement an equivalent with boolean operators is quite simple: you do a bit-by-bit sum (which is an XOR), with carry (which is an AND). Like this:

int sum(int value1, int value2)
{
    int result = 0;
    int carry = 0;
    for (int mask = 1; mask != 0; mask <<= 1)
    {
        int bit1 = value1 & mask;
        int bit2 = value2 & mask;
        result |= mask & (carry ^ bit1 ^ bit2);
        carry = ((bit1 & bit2) | (bit1 & carry) | (bit2 & carry)) << 1;
    }
    return result;
}
7

You've already gotten a couple bit manipulation answers. Here's something different.

In C, arr[ind] == *(arr + ind). This lets us do slightly confusing (but legal) things like int arr = { 3, 1, 4, 5 }; int val = 0[arr];.

So we can define a custom add function (without explicit use of an arithmetic operator) thusly:

unsigned int add(unsigned int const a, unsigned int const b)
{
    /* this works b/c sizeof(char) == 1, by definition */
    char * const aPtr = (char *)a;
    return (int) &(aPtr[b]);
}

Alternately, if we want to avoid this trick, and if by arithmetic operator they include |, &, and ^ (so direct bit manipulation is not allowed) , we can do it via lookup table:

typedef unsigned char byte;

const byte lut_add_mod_256[256][256] = { 
  { 0, 1, 2, /*...*/, 255 },
  { 1, 2, /*...*/, 255, 0 },
  { 2, /*...*/, 255, 0, 1 },
  /*...*/
  { 254, 255, 0, 1, /*...*/, 253 },
  { 255, 0, 1, /*...*/, 253, 254 },
}; 

const byte lut_add_carry_256[256][256] = {
  { 0, 0, 0, /*...*/, 0 },
  { 0, 0, /*...*/, 0, 1 },
  { 0, /*...*/, 0, 1, 1 },
  /*...*/
  { 0, 0, 1, /*...*/, 1 },
  { 0, 1, 1, /*...*/, 1 },
};

void add_byte(byte const a, byte const b, byte * const sum, byte * const carry)
{
  *sum = lut_add_mod_256[a][b];
  *carry = lut_add_carry_256[a][b];
}

unsigned int add(unsigned int a, unsigned int b)
{
  unsigned int sum;
  unsigned int carry;
  byte * const aBytes = (byte *) &a;
  byte * const bBytes = (byte *) &b;
  byte * const sumBytes = (byte *) &sum;
  byte * const carryBytes = (byte *) &carry;

  byte const test[4] = { 0x12, 0x34, 0x56, 0x78 };
  byte BYTE_0, BYTE_1, BYTE_2, BYTE_3;

  /* figure out endian-ness */
  if (0x12345678 == *(unsigned int *)test)
  {
    BYTE_0 = 3;
    BYTE_1 = 2;
    BYTE_2 = 1;
    BYTE_3 = 0;
  }
  else 
  {
    BYTE_0 = 0;
    BYTE_1 = 1;
    BYTE_2 = 2;
    BYTE_3 = 3;
  }


  /* assume 4 bytes to the unsigned int */
  add_byte(aBytes[BYTE_0], bBytes[BYTE_0], &sumBytes[BYTE_0], &carryBytes[BYTE_0]);

  add_byte(aBytes[BYTE_1], bBytes[BYTE_1], &sumBytes[BYTE_1], &carryBytes[BYTE_1]);
  if (carryBytes[BYTE_0] == 1)
  {
    if (sumBytes[BYTE_1] == 255)
    {
      sumBytes[BYTE_1] = 0;
      carryBytes[BYTE_1] = 1;
    }
    else
    {
      add_byte(sumBytes[BYTE_1], 1, &sumBytes[BYTE_1], &carryBytes[BYTE_0]);
    }
  }

  add_byte(aBytes[BYTE_2], bBytes[BYTE_2], &sumBytes[BYTE_2], &carryBytes[BYTE_2]);
  if (carryBytes[BYTE_1] == 1)
  {
    if (sumBytes[BYTE_2] == 255)
    {
      sumBytes[BYTE_2] = 0;
      carryBytes[BYTE_2] = 1;
    }
    else
    {
      add_byte(sumBytes[BYTE_2], 1, &sumBytes[BYTE_2], &carryBytes[BYTE_1]);
    }
  }

  add_byte(aBytes[BYTE_3], bBytes[BYTE_3], &sumBytes[BYTE_3], &carryBytes[BYTE_3]);
  if (carryBytes[BYTE_2] == 1)
  {
    if (sumBytes[BYTE_3] == 255)
    {
      sumBytes[BYTE_3] = 0;
      carryBytes[BYTE_3] = 1;
    }
    else
    {
      add_byte(sumBytes[BYTE_3], 1, &sumBytes[BYTE_3], &carryBytes[BYTE_2]);
    }
  }

  return sum;
}
1
  • Nice for some different answers! return (int) &(aPtr[b]); is kinda cheating as that compiles to an add operation exactly the same as a + b. Lookup tables is certainly interesting. It's worth noting that bBytes[BYTE_3] (say) is also an addition as it adds &bBytes + BYTE_3 to get a memory address to read. – Tom Leys Aug 23 '13 at 5:59
6

All arithmetic operations decompose to bitwise operations to be implemented in electronics, using NAND, AND, OR, etc. gates.

Adder composition can be seen here.

1
  • 2
    Only NAND ~(a&b) or only NOR ~(a|b) operations are used in nano-electronics. It is because ANY boolean function can be implemented by using a combination of only NAND or only NOR gates. It is also much cheaper to produce a homogenous array of millions of NANDs. Their interconnections define the logic of the whole integrated circuit. Memory registers, adders, multipliers, etc. - all are produced from NAND only logic elements. – psihodelia Feb 14 '12 at 12:50
6

For unsigned numbers, use the same addition algorithm as you learned in first class, but for base 2 instead of base 10. Example for 3+2 (base 10), i.e 11+10 in base 2:

   1         ‹--- carry bit
   0 1 1     ‹--- first operand (3)
 + 0 1 0     ‹--- second operand (2)
 -------
   1 0 1     ‹--- total sum (calculated in three steps)
4

If you're feeling comedic, there's always this spectacularly awful approach for adding two (relatively small) unsigned integers. No arithmetic operators anywhere in your code.

In C#:

static uint JokeAdder(uint a, uint b)
{
    string result = string.Format(string.Format("{{0,{0}}}{{1,{1}}}", a, b), null, null);
    return result.Length;
}

In C, using stdio (replace snprintf with _snprintf on Microsoft compilers):

#include <stdio.h>
unsigned int JokeAdder(unsigned int a, unsigned int b)
{
    return snprintf(NULL, 0, "%*.*s%*.*s", a, a, "", b, b, "");
}
3
  • I just looked up _snprintf on MSDN, and it says that if the length of the formatted string is greater than "count" ("count" being the second parameter), then the return value is negative. Does it behave differently if the first parameter is NULL? – dreamlax Jul 20 '09 at 2:00
  • I actually wrote this function using Visual C++. It works. :) The issue is that count is zero. This makes snprintf act like _scprintf, returning the buffer size required rather than trying to copy data into a too-small buffer. – ChrisV Jul 20 '09 at 14:35
  • Of course, if you use _snprintf it says it is potentially unsafe and that you should use _snprintf_s where you specify the maximum formatting length AND buffer size. Likely, _snprintf_s is just a wrapper than calls _snprintf with the lesser of the two sizes. – dreamlax Jul 21 '09 at 0:50
3

Here is a compact C solution. Sometimes recursion is more readable than loops.

int add(int a, int b){
    if (b == 0) return a;
    return add(a ^ b, (a & b) << 1);
}
1
#include<stdio.h>

int add(int x, int y) {
    int a, b;
    do {
        a = x & y;
        b = x ^ y;
        x = a << 1;
        y = b;
    } while (a);
    return b;
}


int main( void ){
    printf( "2 + 3 = %d", add(2,3));
    return 0;
}
1
short int ripple_adder(short int a, short int b)
{
    short int i, c, s, ai, bi;

    c = s = 0;

    for (i=0; i<16; i++)
    {
        ai = a & 1;
        bi = b & 1;

        s |= (((ai ^ bi)^c) << i);
        c = (ai & bi) | (c & (ai ^ bi));

        a >>= 1;
        b >>= 1;
    }
    s |= (c << i);
    return s;
}
1
## to add or subtract without using '+' and '-' ## 
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<process.h>

void main()
{
    int sub,a,b,carry,temp,c,d;

    clrscr();

    printf("enter a and b:");
    scanf("%d%d",&a,&b);

    c=a;
    d=b;
    while(b)
    {
        carry=a&b;
        a=a^b;
        b=carry<<1;
    }
    printf("add(%d,%d):%d\n",c,d,a);

    temp=~d+1;  //take 2's complement of b and add it with a
    sub=c+temp;
    printf("diff(%d,%d):%d\n",c,d,temp);
    getch();
}
0

The following would work.

x - (-y)
2
  • 5
    Clever, but sounds like it fails the "or any other arithmetic operator" part. – leander Jul 19 '09 at 22:04
  • Hilarious none the less – MysteryDev Jan 28 '14 at 0:14
0

This can be done recursively:

int add_without_arithm_recursively(int a, int b)
{
    if (b == 0) 
        return a;

    int sum = a ^ b; // add without carrying
    int carry = (a & b) << 1; // carry, but don’t add
    return add_without_arithm_recursively(sum, carry); // recurse
}

or iteratively:

int add_without_arithm_iteratively(int a, int b)
{
    int sum, carry;

    do 
    {
        sum = a ^ b; // add without carrying
        carry = (a & b) << 1; // carry, but don’t add

        a = sum;
        b = carry;
    } while (b != 0);

    return a;
}
0

Code to implement add,multiplication without using +,* operator; for subtraction pass 1's complement +1 of number to add function

#include<stdio.h>

unsigned int add(unsigned int x,unsigned int y)
{
         int carry=0;
    while (y != 0)
    {

        carry = x & y;  
        x = x ^ y; 
        y = carry << 1;
    }
    return x;
}
int multiply(int a,int b)
{
    int res=0;
    int i=0;
    int large= a>b ? a :b ;
    int small= a<b ? a :b ;
    for(i=0;i<small;i++)
    {
           res = add(large,res);                    
    }
    return res;
}
int main()
{
    printf("Sum :: %u,Multiply is :: %d",add(7,15),multiply(111,111));
    return 0;
}
0

The question asks how to add two numbers so I don't understand why all the solutions offers the addition of two integers? What if the two numbers were floats i.e. 2.3 + 1.8 are they also not considered numbers? Either the question needs to be revised or the answers.

For floats I believe the numbers should be broken into their components i.e. 2.3 = 2 + 0.3 then the 0.3 should be converted to an integer representation by multiplying with its exponent factor i.e 0.3 = 3 * 10^-1 do the same for the other number and then add the integer segment using one of the bit shift methods given as a solution above handling situations for carry over to the unit digits location i.e. 2.7 + 3.3 = 6.0 = 2+3+0.7+0.3 = 2 + 3 + 7x10^-1 + 3x10^-1 = 2 + 3 + 10^10^-1 (this can be handled as two separate additions 2+3=5 and then 5+1=6)

1
  • When it comes to adding, floating point (by design) is done the same way as integer. Floating points are stored internally similar to an integer with a binary mantissa. For instance, if you were working in base 10, storage of 2.56 might look like .256*10^1 except in binary you get .101101x2^5 or something. The point is that once you've shifted bits so the mantissa is the same, adding proceeds exactly as it does with integer. We programmers see it as "Solved" when we reach that point of similarity and might not mention it :) – Bill K Jun 16 '16 at 18:02
0

With given answers above, it can be done in single line code:

int add(int a, int b) {
    return (b == 0) ? a : add(a ^ b, (a & b) << 1);
}
2
  • This doesn't really add anything to the existing answer of if (b == 0) return a; return add(a ^ b, (a & b) << 1);. It just replaces if by ?:. – melpomene Jan 8 '17 at 11:17
  • @melpomene yes, just make 2-line to 1-line – Kuuo Jan 9 '17 at 1:49
0

You can use double negetive to add two integers for example:

int sum2(int a, int b){
    return -(-a-b);
}
2
  • How does this abide without using [any] arithmetic operator? – greybeard Jun 1 '20 at 20:47
  • Without using any operator it is possible two add two integers. Check on this page i just posted new answers with three ways you can do it. – Crispen Gari Jun 3 '20 at 10:00
0

Without using any operators adding two integers can be done in different ways as follows:

int sum_of_2 (int a, int b){
   int sum=0, carry=sum;
   sum =a^b;
   carry = (a&b)<<1;
   return (b==0)? a: sum_of_2(sum, carry);
}
// Or you can just do it in one line as follows:
int sum_of_2 (int a, int b){
   return (b==0)? a: sum_of_2(a^b, (a&b)<<1);
}
// OR you can use the while loop instead of recursion function as follows
int sum_of_2 (int a, int b){
    if(b==0){
       return a;
   }
   while(b!=0){
     int sum = a^b;
     int carry = (a&b)<<1;
     a= sum;
     b=carry;
  }
  return a;
}
1
-1
int add_without_arithmatic(int a, int b)
{
    int sum;
    char *p;
    p = (char *)a;
    sum = (int)&p[b];
    printf("\nSum : %d",sum);
}
2
  • 4
    How about some explanation of what this function does? – Tom Feb 3 '15 at 10:19
  • Cute, but technically undefined behavior (you're forming an out of bounds pointer). – melpomene Jan 8 '17 at 11:14

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