32

I apologize because this seems like such a simple thing.

What's the correct way to insert a newline in a way that the next element is on a newline? It seems like some things automatically do this (such as <p> within `) but I'm seeing behavior where the next element can appear right next to the last element.

HTML:

<ul class="nav nav-tabs span2">
    <li><a href="./index.html"><i class="icon-black icon-music"></i></a></li>
    <li><a href="./about.html"><i class="icon-black icon-eye-open"></i></a></li>
    <li><a href="./team.html"><i class="icon-black icon-user"></i></a></li>
    <li><a href="./contact.html"><i class="icon-black icon-envelope"></i></a></li>
</ul>
<BR /> <!-- It seems dumb to need this!  Is this really how -->
<BR /> <!-- to get a newline? -->
<BR /> <!-- Well, it's what -->
<BR /> <!-- I'm doing now, I suppose... -->
<BR />

<div class="well span6">
    <h3>I wish this appeared on the next line without having to gratuitously use BR!</h3>
</div>

What is the correct or elegant way to handle newlines after things like ul or div? Am I overlooking a general setup of the code that handles this?

53

You're using span6 and span2. Both of these classes are "float:left" meaning, if possible they will always try to sit next to each other. Twitter bootstrap is based on a 12 grid system. So you should generally always get the span**#** to add up to 12.

E.g.: span4 + span4 + span4 OR span6 + span6 OR span4 + span3 + span5.

To force a span down though, without listening to the previous float you can use twitter bootstraps clearfix class. To do this, your code should look like this:

<ul class="nav nav-tabs span2">
  <li><a href="./index.html"><i class="icon-black icon-music"></i></a></li>
  <li><a href="./about.html"><i class="icon-black icon-eye-open"></i></a></li>
  <li><a href="./team.html"><i class="icon-black icon-user"></i></a></li>
  <li><a href="./contact.html"><i class="icon-black icon-envelope"></i></a></li>
</ul>
<!-- Notice this following line -->
<div class="clearfix"></div>
<div class="well span6">
  <h3>I wish this appeared on the next line without having to gratuitously use BR!</h3>
</div>
  • 12
    Alternatively, but along the same lines, you can use the row class. – KingCronus Jul 16 '12 at 8:54
  • 4
    @KingCronus: row won't work if you're in a form-horizontal. – EML Mar 20 '14 at 13:55
13

I believe Twitter Bootstrap has a class called clearfix that you can use to clear the floating.

<ul class="nav nav-tabs span2 clearfix">
5

Like KingCronus mentioned in the comments you can use the row class to make the list or heading on its own line. You could use the row class on either or both elements:

<ul class="nav nav-tabs span2 row">
  <li><a href="./index.html"><i class="icon-black icon-music"></i></a></li>
  <li><a href="./about.html"><i class="icon-black icon-eye-open"></i></a></li>
  <li><a href="./team.html"><i class="icon-black icon-user"></i></a></li>
  <li><a href="./contact.html"><i class="icon-black icon-envelope"></i></a></li>
</ul>

<div class="well span6 row">
  <h3>I wish this appeared on the next line without having to gratuitously use BR!</h3>
</div>
2

Bootstrap 4:

<div class="w-100"></div>

Source: https://v4-alpha.getbootstrap.com/layout/grid/#equal-width-multi-row

1

Using br elements is fine, and as long as you don't need a lot of space between elements, is actually a logical thing to do as anyone can read your code and understand what spacing logic you are using.

The alternative is to create a custom class for white space. In bootstrap 4 you can use

<div class="w-100"></div>

to make a blank row across the page, but this is no different to using the <br> tag. The downside to creating a custom class for white space is that it can be a pain to read for others who view your code. A custom class would also apply the same amount of white space each time you used it, so if you wanted different amounts of white space on the same page, then you would need to create several white space classes.

In most cases, it is just easier to use <br> or <div class="w-100"></div> for the sake of ease and readability. it doesn't look pretty, but it works.

-1

May be the solution could be use a padding property.

<div class="well span6" style="padding-top: 50px">
    <h3>I wish this appeared on the next line without having to 
        gratuitously use BR!
    </h3>
</div>

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