How to print line numbers to the log. Say when outputting some information to the log, I also want to print the line number where that output is in the source code. As we can see in the stack trace, it displays the line number where the exception has occurred. Stack trace is available on the exception object.

Other alternative could be like manually including the line number when printing to the log. Is there any other way?

  • 2
    see @Juan's underappreciated answer below for a short and sweet one-liner! i just gave up 15 points rep downvoting all other answers :v and upvoting Juan's – necromancer Aug 29 '14 at 0:04

18 Answers 18

From Angsuman Chakraborty:

/** Get the current line number.
 * @return int - Current line number.
 */
public static int getLineNumber() {
    return Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2].getLineNumber();
}
  • 2
    This will always return the line number of the return statement in the called method and not necessarily the line number of the method call. – Ron Tuffin Sep 22 '08 at 14:13
  • 1
    I played around a bit and if you use blah.getStackTrace[3].getLineNumber() as the method body it returns the line number of where the method was called. – Ron Tuffin Sep 22 '08 at 14:27
  • 3
    Thats just weird. – Simon Buchan Sep 22 '08 at 23:57
  • 10
    The index will change based on the JVM version. I believe it changed from 1.4 to 1.5. – Ed Thomas Sep 23 '08 at 7:17
  • 1
    Hey @SimonBuchan, The guy has a name :) I wrote that article long back. – Angsuman Chakraborty Apr 27 '16 at 7:42

We ended up using a custom class like this for our Android work:

import android.util.Log;    
public class DebugLog {
 public final static boolean DEBUG = true;    
 public static void log(String message) {
  if (DEBUG) {
    String fullClassName = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2].getClassName();
    String className = fullClassName.substring(fullClassName.lastIndexOf(".") + 1);
    String methodName = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2].getMethodName();
    int lineNumber = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2].getLineNumber();

    Log.d(className + "." + methodName + "():" + lineNumber, message);
  }
 }
}
  • 1
    Hi Michael, thanks for your solution, it is working fine for me to display the line numbers for log info.... thanks again. I am looking forward for your great solutions in android. – sathish Jan 12 '12 at 6:46
  • 3
    I'd do some more research into this code before using it - when I posted the code, getStackTrace()[3] worked. It might be dependent on the version of Android or JVM, or some other factor. – Michael Baltaks Nov 21 '13 at 6:36
  • 1
    this answer doesn't work it shows line no and class name and function name of DebugLog class not line no of caller from other class – Rahul Aug 9 '17 at 6:39

Quick and dirty way:

System.out.println("I'm in line #" + 
    new Exception().getStackTrace()[0].getLineNumber());

With some more details:

StackTraceElement l = new Exception().getStackTrace()[0];
System.out.println(
    l.getClassName()+"/"+l.getMethodName()+":"+l.getLineNumber());

That will output something like this:

com.example.mytest.MyClass/myMethod:103
  • 1
    System.out.println("i am here: " + new Exception().getStackTrace()[0]); gives me all the details I need :) – necromancer Aug 29 '14 at 0:10
  • Note that the JVM is not guaranteed to give a stacktrace where this is correct. I do not believe Hotspot makes that guarantee either (but its stacktraces are normally correct). – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 29 '14 at 10:20
  • very clean, class StackTraceElement l = new Exception().getStackTrace()[1]; work with me – vuhung3990 Feb 7 '15 at 3:48

I am compelled to answer by not answering your question. I'm assuming that you are looking for the line number solely to support debugging. There are better ways. There are hackish ways to get the current line. All I've seen are slow. You are better off using a logging framework like that in java.util.logging package or log4j. Using these packages you can configure your logging information to include context down to the class name. Then each log message would be unique enough to know where it came from. As a result, your code will have a 'logger' variable that you call via

logger.debug("a really descriptive message")

instead of

System.out.println("a really descriptive message")

Log4J allows you to include the line number as part of its output pattern. See http://logging.apache.org/log4j/1.2/apidocs/org/apache/log4j/PatternLayout.html for details on how to do this (the key element in the conversion pattern is "L"). However, the Javadoc does include the following:

WARNING Generating caller location information is extremely slow. It's use should be avoided unless execution speed is not an issue.

  • The underlying mechanism have become much faster in more recent versions of the JVM, but it should still be used sparingly. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Oct 29 '14 at 10:21

The code posted by @simon.buchan will work...

Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2].getLineNumber()

But if you call it in a method it will always return the line number of the line in the method so rather use the code snippet inline.

  • I guessed the '2' was to get the line number of getLineNumber() caller. – Simon Buchan Sep 22 '08 at 14:15
  • @simon.buchan - edit your answer (as per my last comment). I don't want to steal your rep for your answer. – Ron Tuffin Sep 22 '08 at 14:30
  • Or change the 2 to another number. Depending how deep it is nested. – clankill3r Feb 21 '17 at 19:08

I use this little method that outputs the trace and line number of the method that called it.

 Log.d(TAG, "Where did i put this debug code again?   " + Utils.lineOut());

Double click the output to go to that source code line!

You might need to adjust the level value depending on where you put your code.

public static String lineOut() {
    int level = 3;
    StackTraceElement[] traces;
    traces = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace();
    return (" at "  + traces[level] + " " );
}
  • 1
    Where does this Util come from ? – Benj Jun 29 '16 at 13:02
  • @benj Utils is just general class that you have control over. You could put the method in any class (note the method is static). – Sydwell Jun 29 '16 at 20:53
  • 1
    OK, I just wanted to be sure. Thanks for this nice bit of code. – Benj Jun 30 '16 at 7:26

I would recommend using a logging toolkit such as log4j. Logging is configurable via properties files at runtime, and you can turn on / off features such as line number / filename logging.

Looking at the javadoc for the PatternLayout gives you the full list of options - what you're after is %L.

You can't guarantee line number consistency with code, especially if it is compiled for release. I would not recommend using line numbers for that purpose anyway, it would be better to give a payload of the place where the exception was raised (the trivial method being to set the message to include the details of the method call).

You might like to look at exception enrichment as a technique to improve exception handling http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-exception-handling/exception-enrichment.html

If it's been compiled for release this isn't possible. You might want to look into something like Log4J which will automatically give you enough information to determine pretty closely where the logged code occurred.

first the general method (in an utility class, in plain old java1.4 code though, you may have to rewrite it for java1.5 and more)

/**
 * Returns the first "[class#method(line)]: " of the first class not equal to "StackTraceUtils" and aclass. <br />
 * Allows to get past a certain class.
 * @param aclass class to get pass in the stack trace. If null, only try to get past StackTraceUtils. 
 * @return "[class#method(line)]: " (never empty, because if aclass is not found, returns first class past StackTraceUtils)
 */
public static String getClassMethodLine(final Class aclass)  {
    final StackTraceElement st = getCallingStackTraceElement(aclass);
    final String amsg = "[" + st.getClassName() + "#" + st.getMethodName() + "(" + st.getLineNumber()
    +")] <" + Thread.currentThread().getName() + ">: ";
    return amsg;
}

Then the specific utility method to get the right stackElement:

/**
   * Returns the first stack trace element of the first class not equal to "StackTraceUtils" or "LogUtils" and aClass. <br />
   * Stored in array of the callstack. <br />
   * Allows to get past a certain class.
   * @param aclass class to get pass in the stack trace. If null, only try to get past StackTraceUtils. 
   * @return stackTraceElement (never null, because if aClass is not found, returns first class past StackTraceUtils)
   * @throws AssertionFailedException if resulting statckTrace is null (RuntimeException)
   */
  public static StackTraceElement getCallingStackTraceElement(final Class aclass) {
    final Throwable           t         = new Throwable();
    final StackTraceElement[] ste       = t.getStackTrace();
    int index = 1;
    final int limit = ste.length;
    StackTraceElement   st        = ste[index];
    String              className = st.getClassName();
    boolean aclassfound = false;
    if(aclass == null) {
        aclassfound = true;
    }
    StackTraceElement   resst = null;
    while(index < limit) {
        if(shouldExamine(className, aclass) == true) {
            if(resst == null) {
                resst = st;
            }
            if(aclassfound == true) {
                final StackTraceElement ast = onClassfound(aclass, className, st);
                if(ast != null) {
                    resst = ast;
                    break;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                if(aclass != null && aclass.getName().equals(className) == true) {
                    aclassfound = true;
                }
            }
        }
        index = index + 1;
        st        = ste[index];
        className = st.getClassName();
    }
    if(isNull(resst))  {
        throw new AssertionFailedException(StackTraceUtils.getClassMethodLine() + " null argument:" + "stack trace should null"); //$NON-NLS-1$
    }
    return resst;
  }

  static private boolean shouldExamine(String className, Class aclass) {
      final boolean res = StackTraceUtils.class.getName().equals(className) == false && (className.endsWith(LOG_UTILS
        ) == false || (aclass !=null && aclass.getName().endsWith(LOG_UTILS)));
      return res;
  }

  static private StackTraceElement onClassfound(Class aclass, String className, StackTraceElement st) {
      StackTraceElement   resst = null;
      if(aclass != null && aclass.getName().equals(className) == false)
      {
          resst = st;
      }
      if(aclass == null)
      {
          resst = st;
      }
      return resst;
  }

Here is the logger that we use.

it wraps around Android Logger and display class name, method name and line number.

http://www.hautelooktech.com/2011/08/15/android-logging/

Look at this link. In that method you can jump to your line code, when you double click on LogCat's row.

Also you can use this code to get line number:

public static int getLineNumber()
{
    int lineNumber = 0;
    StackTraceElement[] stackTraceElement = Thread.currentThread()
            .getStackTrace();
    int currentIndex = -1;
    for (int i = 0; i < stackTraceElement.length; i++) {
        if (stackTraceElement[i].getMethodName().compareTo("getLineNumber") == 0)
        {
            currentIndex = i + 1;
            break;
        }
    }

    lineNumber = stackTraceElement[currentIndex].getLineNumber();

    return lineNumber;
}
private static final int CLIENT_CODE_STACK_INDEX;

static {
    // Finds out the index of "this code" in the returned stack Trace - funny but it differs in JDK 1.5 and 1.6
    int i = 0;
    for (StackTraceElement ste : Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()) {
        i++;
        if (ste.getClassName().equals(Trace.class.getName())) {
            break;
        }
    }
    CLIENT_CODE_STACK_INDEX = i;
}

private String methodName() {
    StackTraceElement ste=Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[CLIENT_CODE_STACK_INDEX+1];
    return ste.getMethodName()+":"+ste.getLineNumber();
}

These all get you the line numbers of your current thread and method which work great if you use a try catch where you are expecting an exception. But if you want to catch any unhandled exception then you are using the default uncaught exception handler and current thread will return the line number of the handler function, not the class method that threw the exception. Instead of using Thread.currentThread() simply use the Throwable passed in by the exception handler:

Thread.setDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler(new Thread.UncaughtExceptionHandler() {
            public void uncaughtException(Thread t, Throwable e) {              
                if(fShowUncaughtMessage(e,t))               
                    System.exit(1);
            }
        });

In the above use e.getStackTrace()[0] in your handler function (fShowUncaughtMessage) to get the offender.

Below code is tested code for logging line no class name and method name from where logging method is called

public class Utils {
/*
 * debug variable enables/disables all log messages to logcat
 * Useful to disable prior to app store submission
 */
public static final boolean debug = true;

/*
 * l method used to log passed string and returns the
 * calling file as the tag, method and line number prior
 * to the string's message
 */
public static void l(String s) {
    if (debug) {
        String[] msg = trace(Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace(), 3);
        Log.i(msg[0], msg[1] + s);
    } else {
        return;
    }
}

/*
 * l (tag, string)
 * used to pass logging messages as normal but can be disabled
 * when debug == false
 */
public static void l(String t, String s) {
    if (debug) {
        Log.i(t, s);
    } else {
        return;
    }
}

/*
 * trace
 * Gathers the calling file, method, and line from the stack
 * returns a string array with element 0 as file name and 
 * element 1 as method[line]
 */
public static String[] trace(final StackTraceElement e[], final int level) {
    if (e != null && e.length >= level) {
        final StackTraceElement s = e[level];
        if (s != null) { return new String[] {
                e[level].getFileName(), e[level].getMethodName() + "[" + e[level].getLineNumber() + "]"
        };}
    }
    return null;
}
}

My way it works for me

String str = "select os.name from os where os.idos="+nameid;  try {
        PreparedStatement stmt = conn.prepareStatement(str);
        ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery();
        if (rs.next()) {
            a = rs.getString("os.n1ame");//<<<----Here is the ERROR          
        }
        stmt.close();
  } catch (SQLException e) {
        System.out.println("error line : " + e.getStackTrace()[2].getLineNumber());            
        return a;
  }

you can use -> Reporter.log("");

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