I am using this part of code to ping an ip address in java but only pinging localhost is successful and for the other hosts the program says the host is unreachable. I disabled my firewall but still having this problem

public static void main(String[] args) throws UnknownHostException, IOException {
    String ipAddress = "127.0.0.1";
    InetAddress inet = InetAddress.getByName(ipAddress);

    System.out.println("Sending Ping Request to " + ipAddress);
    System.out.println(inet.isReachable(5000) ? "Host is reachable" : "Host is NOT reachable");

    ipAddress = "173.194.32.38";
    inet = InetAddress.getByName(ipAddress);

    System.out.println("Sending Ping Request to " + ipAddress);
    System.out.println(inet.isReachable(5000) ? "Host is reachable" : "Host is NOT reachable");
}

The output is:

Sending Ping Request to 127.0.0.1
Host is reachable
Sending Ping Request to 173.194.32.38
Host is NOT reachable

  • 3
    Is it possible to ping that server if you're using ping directly? – Jenny D Jul 16 '12 at 14:22
  • How is your ipAddress ? – Denys Séguret Jul 16 '12 at 14:23
  • What input are you entering into jTextField1? – chrisbunney Jul 16 '12 at 14:24
  • 2
    @user1529128 I have edited your question with a simple example that reproduces the behaviour you describe. Feel free to roll back the edit if you don't think it is what you are asking. – assylias Jul 16 '12 at 14:35
  • 3
    @ assylias : thank you for your nice edit ! I'm new at stackoverflow and this was my firs question . thank you for helping me. – Mehdi Jul 16 '12 at 14:43

12 Answers 12

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You can not simply ping in Java as it relies on ICMP, which is sadly not supported in Java

http://mindprod.com/jgloss/ping.html

Use sockets instead

Hope it helps

  • 31
    Can someone please explain how this is the right answer? – Ravindranath Akila Jan 16 '14 at 3:11
  • I might now be out of context, but this is what worked for me, very well in fact: dnsjava.org Thanks everybody. – Ravindranath Akila Feb 13 '14 at 3:50
  • Try the ICMP library icmp4j.org – kervin Jul 13 '15 at 13:35
  • 4
    There are better answers below – Igor Zubchenok Apr 21 '16 at 20:25
  • @AhmadArslan whatever answer you used to have posted at that link, it's gone now. So the link isn't really helpful anymore... you seem to have killed your own link... – forresthopkinsa Feb 3 '17 at 20:42

InetAddress.isReachable() according to javadoc:

".. A typical implementation will use ICMP ECHO REQUESTs if the privilege can be obtained, otherwise it will try to establish a TCP connection on port 7 (Echo) of the destination host..".

Option #1 (ICMP) usually requires administrative (root) rights.

  • 1
    Then why can you usually do it as a non-admin/non-root on most computers outside of Java? – Loduwijk Jul 13 '15 at 21:10
  • To clarify: Do commands such as command-line ping not use ICMP packets? I was fairly certain they did. Is ping run in an administrative context? – Loduwijk Jul 13 '15 at 21:15
  • Are you saying that the isReachable method ONLY uses TCP port 7 and it will NOT use ICMP ECHO REQUESTs? Or will it use ICMP if I somehow grant root privilege to my application? If the latter, then how do I allow my app to run as root? – Michael Sims Aug 5 '15 at 20:27
  • 6
    The ping command on Linux is set-uid root; that's why non-root users can utilize it, even though it uses ICMP ECHO_REQUEST. – erickson Sep 17 '15 at 19:07
  • This doesn't really work well: stackoverflow.com/questions/9922543/… – Ethan Mick Jun 12 '16 at 0:43

I think this code will help you:

public class PingExample {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        try{
            InetAddress address = InetAddress.getByName("192.168.1.103");
            boolean reachable = address.isReachable(10000);

            System.out.println("Is host reachable? " + reachable);
        } catch (Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Check your connectivity. On my Computer this prints REACHABLE for both IP's:

Sending Ping Request to 127.0.0.1
Host is reachable
Sending Ping Request to 173.194.32.38
Host is reachable

EDIT:

You could try modifying the code to use getByAddress() to obtain the address:

public static void main(String[] args) throws UnknownHostException, IOException {
    InetAddress inet;

    inet = InetAddress.getByAddress(new byte[] { 127, 0, 0, 1 });
    System.out.println("Sending Ping Request to " + inet);
    System.out.println(inet.isReachable(5000) ? "Host is reachable" : "Host is NOT reachable");

    inet = InetAddress.getByAddress(new byte[] { (byte) 173, (byte) 194, 32, 38 });
    System.out.println("Sending Ping Request to " + inet);
    System.out.println(inet.isReachable(5000) ? "Host is reachable" : "Host is NOT reachable");
}

The getByName() methods may attempt some kind of reverse DNS lookup which may not be possible on your machine, getByAddress() might bypass that.

  • I'm sure I'm connected and I have even disabled my firewall and antivirus , but still it's not working ... – Mehdi Jul 16 '12 at 14:54
  • It may still be your machine. What OS are you on? Have you tried the getByAddress() instead of getByName() method to ensure no reverse DNS lookup is attempted? – Durandal Jul 16 '12 at 15:05
  • @ Durandal I'm using win7 and yes ! I tried getByAddress() instead of getByName() , There was no DNS lookup attempt , don't tell me there is no way for me please ! – Mehdi Jul 16 '12 at 15:18
  • @Durandal I can see the same behaviour as described by the OP and using getByAddress does not make a difference. I have posted a comment with a possible duplicate of the issue. – assylias Jul 16 '12 at 15:19
  • 3
    @vamsi Because the IP is given as literals, and literals are considered to be of type int by the compiler. Because the value range of byte is -128 to 127, values outside that range require an explicit cast (e.g. literal 173). The "why" is rooted in javas byte being signed and IP addresses usually presented as unsigned bytes for readability. – Durandal Jul 22 '13 at 17:26

It will work for sure

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class JavaPingExampleProgram
{

  public static void main(String args[]) 
  throws IOException
  {
    // create the ping command as a list of strings
    JavaPingExampleProgram ping = new JavaPingExampleProgram();
    List<String> commands = new ArrayList<String>();
    commands.add("ping");
    commands.add("-c");
    commands.add("5");
    commands.add("74.125.236.73");
    ping.doCommand(commands);
  }

  public void doCommand(List<String> command) 
  throws IOException
  {
    String s = null;

    ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder(command);
    Process process = pb.start();

    BufferedReader stdInput = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(process.getInputStream()));
    BufferedReader stdError = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(process.getErrorStream()));

    // read the output from the command
    System.out.println("Here is the standard output of the command:\n");
    while ((s = stdInput.readLine()) != null)
    {
      System.out.println(s);
    }

    // read any errors from the attempted command
    System.out.println("Here is the standard error of the command (if any):\n");
    while ((s = stdError.readLine()) != null)
    {
      System.out.println(s);
    }
  }

}
  • 5
    Does this work on all operating systems? – Supuhstar Jul 5 '13 at 2:10
  • 1
    If you change -c to -n, most likely. – Codingale Jun 2 '15 at 0:10
  • 1
    @Supuhstar it will only work on OS that has ping command. Basically what it's doing above is fork a new process and make it run ping command from the OS. – Harry Cho Aug 1 '16 at 21:34

You can use this method to ping hosts on Windows or other platforms:

private static boolean ping(String host) throws IOException, InterruptedException {
    boolean isWindows = System.getProperty("os.name").toLowerCase().contains("win");

    ProcessBuilder processBuilder = new ProcessBuilder("ping", isWindows? "-n" : "-c", "1", host);
    Process proc = processBuilder.start();

    int returnVal = proc.waitFor();
    return returnVal == 0;
}
  • On windows you always get 1 as returnVal. No matter if it is reachable or not. – ssindelar Jun 1 '16 at 12:16


Just an addition to what others have given, even though they work well but in some cases if internet is slow or some unknown network problem exists, some of the codes won't work (isReachable()). But this code mentioned below creates a process which acts as a command line ping (cmd ping) to windows. It works for me in all cases, tried and tested.

Code :-

public class JavaPingApp {

public static void runSystemCommand(String command) {

    try {
        Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);
        BufferedReader inputStream = new BufferedReader(
                new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));

        String s = "";
        // reading output stream of the command
        while ((s = inputStream.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }

    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

    String ip = "stackoverflow.com"; //Any IP Address on your network / Web
    runSystemCommand("ping " + ip);
}
}

Hope it helps, Cheers!!!

On linux with oracle-jdk the code the OP submitted uses port 7 when not root and ICMP when root. It does do a real ICMP echo request when run as root as the documentation specifies.

If you running this on a MS machine you may have to run the app as administrator to get the ICMP behaviour.

Here is a method for pinging an IP address in Java that should work on Windows and Unix systems:

import org.apache.commons.lang3.SystemUtils;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class CommandLine
{
    /**
     * @param ipAddress The internet protocol address to ping
     * @return True if the address is responsive, false otherwise
     */
    public static boolean isReachable(String ipAddress) throws IOException
    {
        List<String> command = buildCommand(ipAddress);
        ProcessBuilder processBuilder = new ProcessBuilder(command);
        Process process = processBuilder.start();

        try (BufferedReader standardOutput = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(process.getInputStream())))
        {
            String outputLine;

            while ((outputLine = standardOutput.readLine()) != null)
            {
                // Picks up Windows and Unix unreachable hosts
                if (outputLine.toLowerCase().contains("destination host unreachable"))
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    private static List<String> buildCommand(String ipAddress)
    {
        List<String> command = new ArrayList<>();
        command.add("ping");

        if (SystemUtils.IS_OS_WINDOWS)
        {
            command.add("-n");
        } else if (SystemUtils.IS_OS_UNIX)
        {
            command.add("-c");
        } else
        {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException("Unsupported operating system");
        }

        command.add("1");
        command.add(ipAddress);

        return command;
    }
}

Make sure to add Apache Commons Lang to your dependencies.

I know this has been answered with previous entries, but for anyone else that comes to this question, I did find a way that did not require having use the "ping" process in windows and then scrubbing the output.

What I did was use JNA to invoke Window's IP helper library to do an ICMP echo

See my own answer to my own similar issue

InetAddress is not always return correct value. It is successful in case of Local Host but for other hosts this shows that the host is unreachable. Try using ping command as given below.

try {
    String cmd = "cmd /C ping -n 1 " + ip + " | find \"TTL\"";        
    Process myProcess = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(cmd);
    myProcess.waitFor();

    if(myProcess.exitValue() == 0) {

    return true;
    }
    else {
        return false;
    }
}
catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
    return false;
}

This should work:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.InputStreamReader;

public class Pinger {

private static String keyWordTolookFor = "average";

public Pinger() {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub
}


 public static void main(String[] args) {
 //Test the ping method on Windows.
 System.out.println(ping("192.168.0.1")); }


public String ping(String IP) {
    try {
        String line;
        Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("ping -n 1 " + IP);
        BufferedReader input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(p.getInputStream()));
        while (((line = input.readLine()) != null)) {

            if (line.toLowerCase().indexOf(keyWordTolookFor.toLowerCase()) != -1) {

                String delims = "[ ]+";
                String[] tokens = line.split(delims);
                return tokens[tokens.length - 1];
            } 
        }

        input.close();
    } catch (Exception err) {
        err.printStackTrace();
    }
    return "Offline";
}

}

  • 3
    Please add a description of how your code works. It will help OP in understanding your code when he applies it. – A Busy Programmer Mar 2 '17 at 1:45
  • Had this to review in the "low quality queue"... But since it dates from an hour... Maybe it will be improved with explanations soon. What is the hurry to post an answer to a 2012 question? Well... I just skip it for now. – Louys Patrice Bessette Mar 2 '17 at 2:39
  • Thank you for all of your comments. First of all this is a class and method to work with windows ONLY. I needed to as a ping time to a project so I came up with this which is dirty but quick if you are working on windows. This is a super quick ~5 min developed code for pinging an IPv4 host as you can see from the code itself. This class and it's method gets a String as an IP address and returns the average time for the ping that is generated in windows CMD. CMD those the ping and this code reads the output to reach to the line that some numerical stats are given. – john smith Mar 2 '17 at 14:47
  • It "tokenizes" the output when min, max and average are given and returns the average time. It is a bit crazy that you can have an average time out of only one ping but this is windows and it does it anyways. – john smith Mar 2 '17 at 14:48
  • Please try it out for yourself on Windows before marking it down. It is an easy / dirty fix for a big problem. – john smith Mar 2 '17 at 14:49

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