I am building some objects in JavaScript and pushing those objects into an array, I am storing the key I want to use in a variable then creating my objects like so:

var key = "happyCount";
myArray.push( { key : someValueArray } );

but when I try to examine my array of objects for every object the key is "key" instead of the value of the variable key. Is there any way to set the value of the key from a variable?

Fiddle for better explanation: http://jsfiddle.net/Fr6eY/3/

marked as duplicate by Bergi javascript Nov 18 '14 at 5:44

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  • 260
    The solution in ES6 is to put the variable in square brackets in order to evaluate it. var key = "happyCount"; myArray.push({ [key]: someValueArray }); – Dan Cron Apr 29 '16 at 20:40
  • @DanCron Sounds great, but when will 99%+ of 'browsers' in the user base be ES6-capable? – Jake Sep 28 '17 at 7:09
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    @Jake The only browser that currently does not support this es6 feature is IE11: kangax.github.io/compat-table/es6/… – Hunter McMillen Sep 28 '17 at 13:47
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    @Jake That's a good point. One possible solution is to use babel to transpile ES6 into ES5. – Dan Cron Sep 29 '17 at 13:16
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    @Jake That is exactly what babel is for. As Dan Cron mentions above. – Hunter McMillen Oct 2 '17 at 15:38
up vote 955 down vote accepted

You need to make the object first, then use [] to set it.

var key = "happyCount";
var obj = {};
obj[key] = someValueArray;
myArray.push(obj);

UPDATE 2018:

If you're able to use ES6 and Babel, you can use this new feature:

{
    [yourKeyVariable]: someValueArray,
}  
  • 1
    Where did you define myArray ? – Alex G May 31 '15 at 2:00
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    @AlexG: It was used in the question. – Rocket Hazmat Jun 1 '15 at 14:10
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    Note, that things changed for the better in ES6, i.e. {[key]:someValueArray} – Frank Nocke Mar 14 '17 at 17:53
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    @Frank Nocke I'm looking forward to be able to use it in about 10 years time when all the 'browsers' we have to support support it... – Jake Sep 28 '17 at 5:11
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    @Jake you can program in ES6 or ES7 today, and have Babel compile your JS file back to ES5. This is how webapps are built nowadays. – Barry Staes Nov 28 '17 at 8:34

Try something like this (check ES6 example at the end of answer)

var yourObject = {};

yourObject[yourKey] = "yourValue";

console.log(yourObject );

example:

var person = {};
var key = "name";

person[key] /* this is same as person.name */ = "John";

console.log(person); // should print  Object { name="John"}

    var person = {};
    var key = "name";
    
    person[key] /* this is same as person.name */ = "John";
    
    console.log(person); // should print  Object { name="John"}

In ES6, you can do like this.

var key = "name";
var person = {[key]:"John"};
console.log(person); // should print  Object { name="John"}

    var key = "name";
    var person = {[key]:"John"};
    console.log(person); // should print  Object { name="John"}

  • I provided a solution that I think may be of some interest to people at this link using underscore: stackoverflow.com/questions/5640988/… – rashadb Jun 2 '15 at 23:46
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    thanks! the ES6 example was exactly what I was looking for to combine with the classNames lib for react. :) – engineerDave Jan 17 at 20:50
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    ES6 sample is perfect. Thanks so much for sharing! – jdpipkin Apr 10 at 12:08

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