In Python 2.x when you want to mark a method as abstract, you can define it like so:

class Base:
    def foo(self):
        raise NotImplementedError("Subclasses should implement this!")

Then if you forget to override it, you get a nice reminder exception. Is there an equivalent way to mark a field as abstract? Or is stating it in the class docstring all you can do?

At first I thought I could set the field to NotImplemented, but when I looked up what it's actually for (rich comparisons) it seemed abusive.

  • It still works, even if it's original intent was for rich comparisons. What's wrong with it? – S.Lott Jul 20 '09 at 0:08
  • 1
    The first problem is you can read the field from the object (myvar = Base.field) and next thing you know there are NotImplementeds all over the place until some other part tries to use it and gets a mysterious AttributeError. – Kiv Jul 20 '09 at 0:22
  • The second problem is that IMO it hampers readability ("What's that rich comparison thing doing there? Did I miss something?) Evan's solution expresses exactly what is going on in a familiar way. – Kiv Jul 20 '09 at 0:23
  • @Kiv: Please do not comment on your question. Please update your question with the specific points you're raising. – S.Lott Jul 20 '09 at 2:23
  • Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2736255/… – guettli Jun 16 '16 at 14:32
up vote 42 down vote accepted

Yes, you can. Use the @property decorator. For instance, if you have a field called "example" then can't you do something like this:

class Base(object):

    @property
    def example(self):
        raise NotImplementedError("Subclasses should implement this!")

Running the following produces a NotImplementedError just like you want.

b = Base()
print b.example
  • 2
    This is simpler, but I like how my version throws immediately and not only if the attribute happens to be used. – Glenn Maynard Jul 20 '09 at 0:10
  • 4
    But Glenn, what if the property example got set at some other point? If it throws it immediately, then it may never get a chance to be set through other means. Remember that fields and methods can be set to a class at any time and not just when the class is defined. – Evan Fosmark Jul 20 '09 at 0:16
  • Ah, this is what I was after. – Kiv Jul 20 '09 at 0:18
  • 2
    If I'm defining a base class which expects a method (or field) to be defined by the user, I expect it to be defined at all times when the base class is active, from init onward. I'd consider defining it later to be an error, because I might want to access them from init. You can define your classes with different rules, of course, but this seems the clearest. (Of course, as I'm originally a C++ programmer, I like nice, strict, well-defined interface rules.) – Glenn Maynard Jul 20 '09 at 0:28
  • 2
    @Glenn, two comments up: that sounds like the C++ philosophy, whereas the Python philosophy is much looser - you only care about what you get when you try to access a property. When you're not trying to access it, it can be anything, including undefined. (Of course this is no requirement, it's just the way a lot of Python code is written, and I think it's the intent of the language creators/maintainers that it be that way.) – David Z Jul 20 '09 at 0:44

Alternate answer:

@property
def NotImplementedField(self):
    raise NotImplementedError

class a(object):
    x = NotImplementedField

class b(a):
    # x = 5
    pass

b().x
a().x

This is like Evan's, but concise and cheap--you'll only get a single instance of NotImplementedField.

  • 3
    Clever, Glenn. :) The only downside I can see is that you can't specify different messages to be shown when NotImplementedError gets thrown. – Evan Fosmark Jul 20 '09 at 0:20
  • 2
    You could define NotImplementedField as a function taking a message to display. You'd have to get a little clever to keep it using a single instance of the function when no message is attached--cache a singleton for no message--but that's about it. – Glenn Maynard Jul 20 '09 at 0:25
  • 1
    Perhaps minor, but I'm not as much a fan of this approach because it restricts your ability to set a message for the exception. By using @property you can set the message to whatever you'd like. – umbrae Nov 13 '11 at 1:09
  • @umbrae: See my previous comment (of two years ago); that's easy to implement if you want it. – Glenn Maynard Nov 13 '11 at 23:34
def require_abstract_fields(obj, cls):
    abstract_fields = getattr(cls, "abstract_fields", None)
    if abstract_fields is None:
        return

    for field in abstract_fields:
        if not hasattr(obj, field):
            raise RuntimeError, "object %s failed to define %s" % (obj, field)

class a(object):
    abstract_fields = ("x", )
    def __init__(self):
        require_abstract_fields(self, a)

class b(a):
    abstract_fields = ("y", )
    x = 5
    def __init__(self):
        require_abstract_fields(self, b)
        super(b, self).__init__()

b()
a()

Note the passing of the class type into require_abstract_fields, so if multiple inherited classes use this, they don't all validate the most-derived-class's fields. You might be able to automate this with a metaclass, but I didn't dig into that. Defining a field to None is accepted.

A better way to do this is using Abstract Base Classes:

import abc

class Foo(abc.ABC):

    @property
    @abc.abstractmethod
    def demo_attribute(self):
        raise NotImplementedError

    @abc.abstractmethod
    def demo_method(self):
        raise NotImplementedError

class BadBar(Foo):
    pass

class GoodBar(Foo):

    demo_attribute = 'yes'

    def demo_method(self):
        return self.demo_attribute

bad_bar = BadBar()
# TypeError: Can't instantiate abstract class BadBar \
# with abstract methods demo_attribute, demo_method

good_bar = GoodBar()
# OK

Note that you should still have raise NotImplementedError instead of something like pass, because there is nothing preventing the inheriting class from calling super().demo_method(), and if the abstract demo_method is just pass, this will fail silently.

  • 1
    What is the difference between raise NotImplementedError and raise NotImplementedError(something). On the face of it, the former raises a class, and the latter raises an instance. Is that ambiguity an issue / problem? – Reb.Cabin Jun 5 at 15:28
  • 1
    @Reb.Cabin Both are valid. Typically, you would raise NotImplementedError when you are not providing any arguments and raise NotImplementedError("something") if you are providing arguments. See: stackoverflow.com/a/16709222/2063031. – ostrokach Jun 5 at 15:46

And here is my solution:

def not_implemented_method(func):
    from functools import wraps
    from inspect import getargspec, formatargspec

    @wraps(func)
    def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):
        c = self.__class__.__name__
        m = func.__name__
        a = formatargspec(*getargspec(func))
        raise NotImplementedError('\'%s\' object does not implement the method \'%s%s\'' % (c, m, a))

    return wrapper


def not_implemented_property(func):
    from functools import wraps
    from inspect import getargspec, formatargspec

    @wraps(func)
    def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):
        c = self.__class__.__name__
        m = func.__name__
        raise NotImplementedError('\'%s\' object does not implement the property \'%s\'' % (c, m))

    return property(wrapper, wrapper, wrapper)

It can be used as

class AbstractBase(object):
    @not_implemented_method
    def test(self):
        pass

    @not_implemented_property
    def value(self):
        pass

class Implementation(AbstractBase):
    value = None

    def __init__(self):
        self.value = 42

    def test(self):
        return True

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