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I'm having much trouble trying to understand just how the multiprocessing queue works on python and how to implement it. Lets say I have two python modules that access data from a shared file, let's call these two modules a writer and a reader. My plan is to have both the reader and writer put requests into two separate multiprocessing queues, and then have a third process pop these requests in a loop and execute as such.

My main problem is that I really don't know how to implement multiprocessing.queue correctly, you cannot really instantiate the object for each process since they will be separate queues, how do you make sure that all processes relate to a shared queue (or in this case, queues)

  • 4
    pass the Queues to each process class as a parameter when you instantiate them in the parent process. – Joel Cornett Jul 17 '12 at 4:20
115
0

My main problem is that I really don't know how to implement multiprocessing.queue correctly, you cannot really instantiate the object for each process since they will be separate queues, how do you make sure that all processes relate to a shared queue (or in this case, queues)

This is a simple example of a reader and writer sharing a single queue... The writer sends a bunch of integers to the reader; when the writer runs out of numbers, it sends 'DONE', which lets the reader know to break out of the read loop.

from multiprocessing import Process, Queue
import time
import sys

def reader_proc(queue):
    ## Read from the queue; this will be spawned as a separate Process
    while True:
        msg = queue.get()         # Read from the queue and do nothing
        if (msg == 'DONE'):
            break

def writer(count, queue):
    ## Write to the queue
    for ii in range(0, count):
        queue.put(ii)             # Write 'count' numbers into the queue
    queue.put('DONE')

if __name__=='__main__':
    pqueue = Queue() # writer() writes to pqueue from _this_ process
    for count in [10**4, 10**5, 10**6]:             
        ### reader_proc() reads from pqueue as a separate process
        reader_p = Process(target=reader_proc, args=((pqueue),))
        reader_p.daemon = True
        reader_p.start()        # Launch reader_proc() as a separate python process

        _start = time.time()
        writer(count, pqueue)    # Send a lot of stuff to reader()
        reader_p.join()         # Wait for the reader to finish
        print("Sending {0} numbers to Queue() took {1} seconds".format(count, 
            (time.time() - _start)))
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  • 10
    Great example. Just as an additional bit of information to address the OP's confusion... This example shows that a shared queue needs to originate from the master process, which is then passed to all of its subprocesses. In order for two completely unrelated processes to share data, they must communicate over some central or associated network device (sockets for example). Something has to coordinate the information. – jdi Jul 17 '12 at 5:28
  • 5
    nice example.. i'm also new to this topic.. if i have multiple processes running the same target function (with different arguments), how to make sure that they dont clash while putting the data into the queue.. is lock necessary? – WYSIWYG Jan 4 '14 at 17:26
  • @bharat_iyengar From the multiprocessing module documentation, it says that Queue is implemented using a few locks/semaphores. So when you use the get() and put(object) Queue methods, the queue will block if some other process/thread is trying getting or putting something on the queue. So you don't have to worry about manually locking it. – almel Jun 5 '14 at 22:01
  • 1
    Explicit stop conditions are better than implicit stop conditions – Mike Pennington Sep 14 '17 at 7:26
  • 2
    Qsize can go to zero if the queue readers exceed the rate of the queue writer – Mike Pennington Sep 14 '18 at 21:25
7
0

in "from queue import Queue" there is no module called queue, instead multiprocessing should be used. Therefore, it should look like "from multiprocessing import Queue"

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  • 10
    While years late, using multiprocessing.Queue is correct. The normal Queue.Queue is used for python threads. When you try to use Queue.Queue with multiprocessing, copies of the Queue object will be created in each child process and the child processes will never be updated. Basically, Queue.Queue works by using a global shared object, and multiprocessing.Queue works using IPC. See: stackoverflow.com/questions/925100/… – Michael Guffre Jun 11 '18 at 0:08
2
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Here's a dead simple usage of multiprocessing.Queue and multiprocessing.Process that allows callers to send an "event" plus arguments to a separate process that dispatches the event to a "do_" method on the process. (Python 3.4+)

import multiprocessing as mp
import collections

Msg = collections.namedtuple('Msg', ['event', 'args'])

class BaseProcess(mp.Process):
    """A process backed by an internal queue for simple one-way message passing.
    """
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super().__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.queue = mp.Queue()

    def send(self, event, *args):
        """Puts the event and args as a `Msg` on the queue
        """
       msg = Msg(event, args)
       self.queue.put(msg)

    def dispatch(self, msg):
        event, args = msg

        handler = getattr(self, "do_%s" % event, None)
        if not handler:
            raise NotImplementedError("Process has no handler for [%s]" % event)

        handler(*args)

    def run(self):
        while True:
            msg = self.queue.get()
            self.dispatch(msg)

Usage:

class MyProcess(BaseProcess):
    def do_helloworld(self, arg1, arg2):
        print(arg1, arg2)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    process = MyProcess()
    process.start()
    process.send('helloworld', 'hello', 'world')

The send happens in the parent process, the do_* happens in the child process.

I left out any exception handling that would obviously interrupt the run loop and exit the child process. You can also customize it by overriding run to control blocking or whatever else.

This is really only useful in situations where you have a single worker process, but I think it's a relevant answer to this question to demonstrate a common scenario with a little more object-orientation.

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2
0

We implemented two versions of this, one a simple multi thread pool that can execute many types of callables, making our lives much easier and the second version that uses processes, which is less flexible in terms of callables and requires and extra call to dill.

Setting frozen_pool to true will freeze execution until finish_pool_queue is called in either class.

Thread Version:

'''
Created on Nov 4, 2019

@author: Kevin
'''
from threading import Lock, Thread
from Queue import Queue
import traceback
from helium.loaders.loader_retailers import print_info
from time import sleep
import signal
import os

class ThreadPool(object):
    def __init__(self, queue_threads, *args, **kwargs):
        self.frozen_pool = kwargs.get('frozen_pool', False)
        self.print_queue = kwargs.get('print_queue', True)
        self.pool_results = []
        self.lock = Lock()
        self.queue_threads = queue_threads
        self.queue = Queue()
        self.threads = []

        for i in range(self.queue_threads):
            t = Thread(target=self.make_pool_call)
            t.daemon = True
            t.start()
            self.threads.append(t)

    def make_pool_call(self):
        while True:
            if self.frozen_pool:
                #print '--> Queue is frozen'
                sleep(1)
                continue

            item = self.queue.get()
            if item is None:
                break

            call = item.get('call', None)
            args = item.get('args', [])
            kwargs = item.get('kwargs', {})
            keep_results = item.get('keep_results', False)

            try:
                result = call(*args, **kwargs)

                if keep_results:
                    self.lock.acquire()
                    self.pool_results.append((item, result))
                    self.lock.release()

            except Exception as e:
                self.lock.acquire()
                print e
                traceback.print_exc()
                self.lock.release()
                os.kill(os.getpid(), signal.SIGUSR1)

            self.queue.task_done()

    def finish_pool_queue(self):
        self.frozen_pool = False

        while self.queue.unfinished_tasks > 0:
            if self.print_queue:
                print_info('--> Thread pool... %s' % self.queue.unfinished_tasks)
            sleep(5)

        self.queue.join()

        for i in range(self.queue_threads):
            self.queue.put(None)

        for t in self.threads:
            t.join()

        del self.threads[:]

    def get_pool_results(self):
        return self.pool_results

    def clear_pool_results(self):
        del self.pool_results[:]

Process Version:

  '''
Created on Nov 4, 2019

@author: Kevin
'''
import traceback
from helium.loaders.loader_retailers import print_info
from time import sleep
import signal
import os
from multiprocessing import Queue, Process, Value, Array, JoinableQueue, Lock,\
    RawArray, Manager
from dill import dill
import ctypes
from helium.misc.utils import ignore_exception
from mem_top import mem_top
import gc

class ProcessPool(object):
    def __init__(self, queue_processes, *args, **kwargs):
        self.frozen_pool = Value(ctypes.c_bool, kwargs.get('frozen_pool', False))
        self.print_queue = kwargs.get('print_queue', True)
        self.manager = Manager()
        self.pool_results = self.manager.list()
        self.queue_processes = queue_processes
        self.queue = JoinableQueue()
        self.processes = []

        for i in range(self.queue_processes):
            p = Process(target=self.make_pool_call)
            p.start()
            self.processes.append(p)

        print 'Processes', self.queue_processes

    def make_pool_call(self):
        while True:
            if self.frozen_pool.value:
                sleep(1)
                continue

            item_pickled = self.queue.get()

            if item_pickled is None:
                #print '--> Ending'
                self.queue.task_done()
                break

            item = dill.loads(item_pickled)

            call = item.get('call', None)
            args = item.get('args', [])
            kwargs = item.get('kwargs', {})
            keep_results = item.get('keep_results', False)

            try:
                result = call(*args, **kwargs)

                if keep_results:
                    self.pool_results.append(dill.dumps((item, result)))
                else:
                    del call, args, kwargs, keep_results, item, result

            except Exception as e:
                print e
                traceback.print_exc()
                os.kill(os.getpid(), signal.SIGUSR1)

            self.queue.task_done()

    def finish_pool_queue(self, callable=None):
        self.frozen_pool.value = False

        while self.queue._unfinished_tasks.get_value() > 0:
            if self.print_queue:
                print_info('--> Process pool... %s' % (self.queue._unfinished_tasks.get_value()))

            if callable:
                callable()

            sleep(5)

        for i in range(self.queue_processes):
            self.queue.put(None)

        self.queue.join()
        self.queue.close()

        for p in self.processes:
            with ignore_exception: p.join(10)
            with ignore_exception: p.terminate()

        with ignore_exception: del self.processes[:]

    def get_pool_results(self):
        return self.pool_results

    def clear_pool_results(self):
        del self.pool_results[:]
def test(eg):
        print 'EG', eg

Call with either:

tp = ThreadPool(queue_threads=2)
tp.queue.put({'call': test, 'args': [random.randint(0, 100)]})
tp.finish_pool_queue()

or

pp = ProcessPool(queue_processes=2)
pp.queue.put(dill.dumps({'call': test, 'args': [random.randint(0, 100)]}))
pp.queue.put(dill.dumps({'call': test, 'args': [random.randint(0, 100)]}))
pp.finish_pool_queue()
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0
0

Just made a simple and general example for demonstrating passing a message over a Queue between 2 standalone programs. It doesn't directly answer the OP's question but should be clear enough indicating the concept.

Server:

multiprocessing-queue-manager-server.py

import asyncio
import concurrent.futures
import multiprocessing
import multiprocessing.managers
import queue
import sys
import threading
from typing import Any, AnyStr, Dict, Union


class QueueManager(multiprocessing.managers.BaseManager):

    def get_queue(self, ident: Union[AnyStr, int, type(None)] = None) -> multiprocessing.Queue:
        pass


def get_queue(ident: Union[AnyStr, int, type(None)] = None) -> multiprocessing.Queue:
    global q

    if not ident in q:
        q[ident] = multiprocessing.Queue()

    return q[ident]


q: Dict[Union[AnyStr, int, type(None)], multiprocessing.Queue] = dict()
delattr(QueueManager, 'get_queue')


def init_queue_manager_server():
    if not hasattr(QueueManager, 'get_queue'):
        QueueManager.register('get_queue', get_queue)


def serve(no: int, term_ev: threading.Event):
    manager: QueueManager
    with QueueManager(authkey=QueueManager.__name__.encode()) as manager:
        print(f"Server address {no}: {manager.address}")

        while not term_ev.is_set():
            try:
                item: Any = manager.get_queue().get(timeout=0.1)
                print(f"Client {no}: {item} from {manager.address}")
            except queue.Empty:
                continue


async def main(n: int):
    init_queue_manager_server()
    term_ev: threading.Event = threading.Event()
    executor: concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor = concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor()

    i: int
    for i in range(n):
        asyncio.ensure_future(asyncio.get_running_loop().run_in_executor(executor, serve, i, term_ev))

    # Gracefully shut down
    try:
        await asyncio.get_running_loop().create_future()
    except asyncio.CancelledError:
        term_ev.set()
        executor.shutdown()
        raise


if __name__ == '__main__':
    asyncio.run(main(int(sys.argv[1])))

Client:

multiprocessing-queue-manager-client.py

import multiprocessing
import multiprocessing.managers
import os
import sys
from typing import AnyStr, Union


class QueueManager(multiprocessing.managers.BaseManager):

    def get_queue(self, ident: Union[AnyStr, int, type(None)] = None) -> multiprocessing.Queue:
        pass


delattr(QueueManager, 'get_queue')


def init_queue_manager_client():
    if not hasattr(QueueManager, 'get_queue'):
        QueueManager.register('get_queue')


def main():
    init_queue_manager_client()

    manager: QueueManager = QueueManager(sys.argv[1], authkey=QueueManager.__name__.encode())
    manager.connect()

    message = f"A message from {os.getpid()}"
    print(f"Message to send: {message}")
    manager.get_queue().put(message)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Usage

Server:

$ python3 multiprocessing-queue-manager-server.py N

N is a integer indicating how many servers should be created. Copy one of the <server-address-N> output by the server and make it the first argument of each multiprocessing-queue-manager-client.py.

Client:

python3 multiprocessing-queue-manager-client.py <server-address-1>

Result

Server:

Client 1: <item> from <server-address-1>

Gist: https://gist.github.com/89062d639e40110c61c2f88018a8b0e5


UPD: Created a package here.

Server:

import ipcq


with ipcq.QueueManagerServer(address=ipcq.Address.DEFAULT, authkey=ipcq.AuthKey.DEFAULT) as server:
    server.get_queue().get()

Client:

import ipcq


client = ipcq.QueueManagerClient(address=ipcq.Address.DEFAULT, authkey=ipcq.AuthKey.DEFAULT)
client.get_queue().put('a message')

enter image description here

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