1

My assignment is to make a class that acts like a standard library List. I am unable to get the iterator to work properly, because it must access the tail of the linked list when decrementing from the end. Here is a section of my header file:

typedef int T;//for now; eventually will be templated
class list;//**forward declaration, doesn't let other classes know about _tail.**
class Node
{
    //this works fine; class definition removed to make post shorter
};
class list_iterator
{
    private:
        Node* _node;
        list* _list;
    public:
        //constructor
        list_iterator& operator--(){_node=_node?(_node->_prev):(_list->_tail);return *this;}
        //some other declarations
};
class list
{
    friend class list_iterator;
    private:
        Node/*<T>*/ *_head,***_tail**;
        int _size;
    public:
        typedef list_iterator iterator;
        //some constructors and other method declarations
        iterator begin() const {iterator it(_head);return it;}
        iterator end() const {iterator it(0);return it;}
        //more method declarations
};

I tried to bold the important parts, but it is just surrounding them with asterisks. NOTE: Most of the member functions are defined in the cpp file; they all happen to be removed for a short post.

4
  • The function implementations you give here are called inline. You should learn what this means to the compiler so you can continue to use it correctly. Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:43
  • As for the bold formatting...it looks like you put too many asterisks. Bold only requires two of them. If that doesn't work, try adding spaces before the first two asterisks and after the last two. (In fact, your code formatting in general could be improved with some well-placed spaces.) Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:45
  • There is a pointer for one of them that I wanted to highlight. turns out this feature was declined (escaping bold in code) - meta.stackexchange.com/questions/32705/bold-code-in-a-question
    – aaazalea
    Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:47
  • Sorry, I had a parse error. I missed that the extra * was for the pointer declaration. Also, thanks for the link. Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

4

You just need to move the method definition of operator-- out of the class and put it after list (or in the source file (probably a better idea. Leave the header file for declarations)).

Note: Leave the declaration inside list_iterator

class list_iterator
{
    /* STUFF */
    list_iterator& operator--();
 };
class list
{ 
     /*  STUFF */ 
};

// Now list_iterator::operator-- can see all the members of list.
list_iterator& list_iterator::operator--()
{
    _node=_node?(_node->_prev):(_list->_tail);
    return *this;
}

Unlike what some other answers suggest. Friendship does NOT break encapsulation. In fact in increases encapsulation (when done correctly) by making the friend part of the classes interface. It does however tightly bind the friend to the class.

This is exactly what you want for iterators. For the iterator to work efficiently it needs to know the internals of the class so it is usually a friend (or an internal class). It increases the usability of the class without exposing the internal workings of the class at the cost that it tightly couples the iterator to the class (so if you change the class you will need to change the implementation of the iterator (but this is not unexpected)).

3
  • In general separating function implementations from class declarations like this example is a Good Idea(TM). Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:42
  • @Code-Guru: Though I agree in principle the advice is too generic. Actual on the ground practice will be tailored to the situation. Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 17:15
  • I agree that my previous advice here was too generic. To add to it, one should understand the differences between inline functions and non-inline functions and choose the most appropriate method. In this particular situation, understanding the difference between declarations and definitions is also essential to fixing the compiler errors. Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 22:50
2

By far the easiest way is to nest the iterator inside the list class:

class list { 
    Node *head, *tail;

    class iterator {
        Node *node;
        list *list;
    // ...
    };
};

If you don't want to do that, you'll need to split the implementations of both list and list_iterator into two pieces: first a class definition that only declares the member functions, then implementations of the member functions:

class list;

class list_iterator { 
    // ...
    Node *n;
    list *l;
};

class list {
    // ...
    friend class list_iterator;
};

inline list_iterator& list_iterator::operator--(){
    _node=_node?(_node->_prev):(_list->_tail);
    return *this;
}

This way, list has been declared by the time you define the list * in the definition of list_iterator. Then _tail has been defined in list, then you have the code in list_iterator::operator-- that actually needs to use list::_tail..

7
  • it is a friend, it's just defined beforehand.
    – aaazalea
    Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:23
  • 1
    @Jake: You just need to move the method definition operator-- out of the class. And put it after list. Note: Leave the declaration inside list_iterator Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:24
  • make that an answer and I'll accept it (assuming nothing better comes along).
    – aaazalea
    Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:25
  • 1
    @Jake223: Obvious benefits include simplicity and lack of name pollution. Not nesting allows you to do SCARY iterators, which are handy, but probably well beyond what you're expected to deal with for your assignment (and, in fact, don't apply at all unless your classes include quite a bit you're not showing). Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:45
  • 1
    @Jake223 These alternatives are not mutually exclusive. Even with nested classes, you should often still define methods in a separate .cpp file. As I commented above, the difference between how you have written your code and spearate .h and .cpp files has to do with inline functions. The alternative to nesting classes is using friend classes as you have in your original code. (Which again can use a separate .cpp file.) Commented Jul 17, 2012 at 16:47

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