6

I am trying to make a Dictionary in C# that uses a boolean array for its keys.

 Dictionary<bool[], string> 

The bool array has fixed length of 1000, and all are the same length. I'm having trouble with the hashcode and the common method of an 'exclusive or' doesn't make as much sense because of the length of the array.

Similar questions on StackOverflow are addressed with the 'exclusive or' in the GetHashCode method. I don't think that works in this context. I would like to use it as:

 Dictionary<bool[], string> myDict = 
             new Dictionary<bool[], string>(EqualityComparer);

where EquaityComparer does something like:

   public class EqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<bool[]>
    {
        public bool Equals(bool[] x, bool[] y)
        {
            return x.SequenceEqual(y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(bool[] x)
        {
            // this part doesn't work correctly
            int hc = x.GetHashCode();
            return hc;
        }
    }

Of course all of the usual concerns about the bool array being mutable and the size of any derived key being relevant to performance apply here...though I don't have a solution.

  • 1
    Rather than calling the default GetHashCode for bool[], I think you need to implement your own. – FishBasketGordo Jul 17 '12 at 17:41
  • 1
    return x.Intersect(y) == x; is also not correct. You are comparing instances of IEnumerable<bool> and bool array – L.B Jul 17 '12 at 17:44
  • Sure. I landed on using SequenceEqual for the equals method. Here I am more specifically needing help with the hashcode. – Vic Jul 17 '12 at 18:04
8

Both your Equals and HashCode are incorrect.

Presumably you wish to use SequenceEqual to compare the arrays for equality, or else a simple for loop.

To calculate a hashcode you can use any of the standard methods. It is very important that if two items compare equal then they must have the same hash.

Example

public int GetHashCode(bool[] x)
{
    int result = 29;
    foreach (bool b in x)
    {
        if (b) { result++; }
        result *= 23;
    }
    return result;
}

Related

  • Ah, here I see we are mapping the sequence to an integer. Could you explain this answer a bit further please? I would be concerned of an overflow error with this implementation; there are 1000 elements in the array. (I tried something similar...) – Vic Jul 17 '12 at 18:28
  • ...specifically, in this implementation, we hit the max integer value after the 6th instance of true and the value of 'result' flips to negative. Is this appropriate? – Vic Jul 17 '12 at 18:42
  • 1
    @Vic the overflow is ok. The hash value may be any bit combination storable in an Int32; negative values are fine. One of the reasons for using 23 (or 31 as I like to do) in the multiplier is to ensure that earlier results have an affect on later values in the hash. For instance, multiplying by 2 would shift off the earlier values completely in 32 iterations. – Kevin Brock Jul 17 '12 at 19:23
1

For performance and consistency I would recommend storing your bool[] in another class. You know already that the key may not change so you can take advantage of this by storing the hash in the key class. The dictionary internal operations may use this hash multiple times for a single access (we are not supposed to have to know the internal implementation details though so it's best to assume this may be executed many times).

For performance you may still want to access or even keep a reference to the bool[] externally but the safest technique would be to make a safe copy in the key class.

public class BoolArrayKey
{
    private int hash;
    private bool[] data;

    public BoolArrayKey(bool[] source)
    {
        data = new bool[source.Length];
        Array.Copy(source, data, source.Length);
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        BoolArrayKey other = obj as BoolArrayKey;
        if (other == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return other.data.SequenceEqual(data);
    }

    public override int HashCode()
    {
        if (hash == 0)
        {
            // Mark's hash implementation here, store the result in `hash`.
        }

        return hash;    
    }
}

If a you expect a frequent hash value of 0 then you could use another bool variable to indicate if the value had been computed.

  • All excellent suggestions @Kevin Brock. I distilled this chunk of my code out of the question presentation for clarity. I do like the idea of storing the hashcode...so thanks for that. – Vic Jul 17 '12 at 20:00
0

For best performance, do not use bool[] array which will make hashing and comparison really slow. For example, you can store the same information in a Uint32[] array of 1/32 length, making hashing and comparison much faster.

If you keep bool[] array, consider using unsafe code for hashing/comparison.

If you want to only use safe code, at least remove conditional in the loop:

hash = hash * 3 + (int) x[i];

Also compare using your own loop should be faster than SequenceEqual

  • Of course I am not locked into using the bool[] array; I present the problem in that format because a "vector of Kronecker deltas" isn't very explanatory. The BitArray suggestion of @D Stanley is also "good for me". I'm not clear on what you mean by "unsafe code". And I am seeing a 50x speed difference between SequenceEquals and a for-loop comparison ...so thanks for the that. – Vic Jul 17 '12 at 19:25
0

The rule for implementing GetHashCode is that any two objects that are equal must generate the same hash code. One guideline is to have as few collisions as possible (it's not a requirements that hash codes be unique).

This implementation uses the BitArray class to take your boolean array in groups of 32, treats them as bits and computes the hash code of the resulting 32-bit integers:

public int GetHashCode(bool[] x)
{
    // Trivial case
    if (x.Length == 0) return 0;

    // Convert the bool array to a BitArray to use framework functions
    BitArray binary = new BitArray(x);

    //Determine the max # of 32-bit INTS this array represents
    int intLength = (x.Length-1)/32 + 1;
    int [] ints = new int[intLength];

    // Copy each block of 32-bits to an int
    binary.CopyTo(ints, 0);

    // Take the exclusive OR of each int and return the result's hash code
    return ints.Aggregate((i1, i2) => i1 ^ i2).GetHashCode();
}
  • 1
    The rule for implementing GetHashCode is that.... One more rule: It should be as fast as possible. – L.B Jul 17 '12 at 18:53
  • It does look rather expensive @D Stanley; although a 'bit' of bit-math is a welcomed consideration here, and I will think on it. – Vic Jul 17 '12 at 19:09

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