48

Often I get hard to debug infinite recursions when coding ruby. Is there a way to get a backtrace out of a SystemStackError to find out, where exactly the infinite loop occurs?

Example

Given some methods foo, bar and baz which call each other in a loop:

def foo
  bar
end

def bar
  baz
end

def baz
  foo
end

foo

When I run this code, I just get the message test.rb:6: stack level too deep (SystemStackError). It would be useful to get at least the last 100 lines of the stack, so I could immediately see this is a loop between foo, bar and baz, like this:

test.rb:6: stack level too deep (SystemStackError)
  test.rb:2:in `foo'
  test.rb:10:in `baz'
  test.rb:6:in `bar'
  test.rb:2:in `foo'
  test.rb:10:in `baz'
  test.rb:6:in `bar'
  test.rb:2:in `foo'
  [...]

Is there any way to accomplish this?

EDIT:

As you may see from the answer below, Rubinius can do it. Unfortunately some rubinius bugs prevent me from using it with the software I'd like to debug. So to be precise the question is:

How do I get a backtrace with MRI (the default ruby) 1.9?

3

Apparently this was tracked as feature 6216 and fixed in Ruby 2.2.

$ ruby system-stack-error.rb
system-stack-error.rb:6:in `bar': stack level too deep (SystemStackError)
        from system-stack-error.rb:2:in `foo'
        from system-stack-error.rb:10:in `baz'
        from system-stack-error.rb:6:in `bar'
        from system-stack-error.rb:2:in `foo'
        from system-stack-error.rb:10:in `baz'
        from system-stack-error.rb:6:in `bar'
        from system-stack-error.rb:2:in `foo'
        from system-stack-error.rb:10:in `baz'
         ... 10067 levels...
        from system-stack-error.rb:10:in `baz'
        from system-stack-error.rb:6:in `bar'
        from system-stack-error.rb:2:in `foo'
        from system-stack-error.rb:13:in `<main>'
  • I'm using 2.3.1 and this does nothing... Am I missing something? – Justus Eapen Apr 11 '17 at 13:39
  • Nothing at all? It works for me with ruby 2.4.0p0 – Martin Vidner Apr 12 '17 at 10:14
  • Yesterday I had a stack error and tried it. Nothing happened. I resolved the issue then and just tried it again to see and got a no such file or directory LoadError. – Justus Eapen Apr 12 '17 at 15:47
  • I've actually got the same problem, both with 2.3.x and 2.4.3 (on Windows). I also tried catching the exception and looking at its backtrace, but for some weird reason that gives nil. – Martin Ender Mar 18 '18 at 13:28
41

Another method for those finding this question later... An excellent gist provides instructions on enabling a trace function in the console and printing all function calls to a file. Just tested on 1.9.3-p194 and it worked great.

Including here in case the gist goes away someday:

$enable_tracing = false
$trace_out = open('trace.txt', 'w')

set_trace_func proc { |event, file, line, id, binding, classname|
  if $enable_tracing && event == 'call'
    $trace_out.puts "#{file}:#{line} #{classname}##{id}"
  end
}

$enable_tracing = true
a_method_that_causes_infinite_recursion_in_a_not_obvious_way()
  • 2
    This worked especially well for me in conjunction with @gerry-gleason's tip. By raising an exception, I'm not overwhelmed by the calls that aren't recursive. – Martin Dorey Feb 25 '14 at 0:15
  • 3
    huh, very stupid you can't get a meaningful stacktrace when you most need it... thanks, this worked for me – akostadinov Jul 24 '14 at 12:13
  • Combine this answer with mine below that tests the stack depth and raises an exception at some limit and you have a sort of automated detection. Oh, that's its own answer, I'll vote that up. – Gerry Gleason May 20 '15 at 13:39
20

This has been a somewhat vexing problem that I've had from time to time in debugging ruby/rails. I just discovered a workable technique to detect the stack growing out of bounds before it crashed the system stack and the real backtrace gets lost or garbled. The basic pattern is:

raise "crash me" if caller.length > 500

bump up the 500 until it doesn't fire prematurely and you will have a nice trace of your growing stack problem.

  • 1
    The problem is where to put it. You can't put this in every single step in a program. You can perhaps use this for figuring out the location by trial-and-error after an error is raised, but you can not in advance locate this in code. – sawa May 5 '14 at 19:16
  • still a faster way of finding out something :) – andre.orvalho Nov 18 '14 at 16:24
  • 1
    Using caller_locations.length is more efficient, particularly if you're using @elliot-nelson's tracing technique. – spume Feb 10 '15 at 17:05
  • 3
    sawa - Put this in a set_trace_func proc, surrounded with an if statement - 'if event == "call" && caller.length > 500' – Jonathan Swartz Feb 23 '15 at 17:45
12

Here:

begin
  foo
rescue SystemStackError
  puts $!
  puts caller[0..100]
end

The method Kernel#caller returns a stack backtrace as an array, so this prints the first 0 to 100 entries in the backtrace. Because caller can be called at any time (and used for some pretty weird things) even if Ruby doesn't print backtrace for SystemStackErrors, you can still get a backtrace.

  • 4
    Does not work on my ruby 1.9.3-p194 with the following code: gist.github.com/3136778. It just outputs recursion.rb:6: stack level too deep (SystemStackError). Did you try it yourself? Which ruby version are you using? – iblue Jul 18 '12 at 15:13
  • @iblue: I'll look. – Linuxios Jul 18 '12 at 15:13
  • @iblue: See edit. That should fix it. Gave me a stack trace of where foo was being called from, and my foo was just def foo; foo; end. – Linuxios Jul 18 '12 at 15:17
  • 3
    Still does not print a backtrace containing any of the methods foo, bar or baz. It outputs stack level too deep and recursion.rb:13:in <main>'`, which is the line the begin block starts. Does not help. – iblue Jul 18 '12 at 15:19
  • 1
    Then I get the source of the Exception (recursion.rb:6), but still no backtrace. – iblue Jul 18 '12 at 15:25
6

Combining suggestions from several answers, this will throw an error (with stack trace) when your call stack gets too deep. This will slow down all method calls, so you should try to put it as close to where you think the infinite loop is happening as you can.

set_trace_func proc {
  |event, file, line, id, binding, classname| 
  if event == "call"  && caller_locations.length > 500
    fail "stack level too deep"
  end
}
  • Also suggested below, you might add this change to the answer to make it a little faster: Using caller_locations.length is more efficient, particularly if you're using @elliot-nelson's tracing technique – Gerry Gleason May 20 '15 at 13:48
  • Changed to caller_locations.length, thanks Gerry – Jonathan Swartz May 21 '15 at 16:39
4

If you happen to use pry, this will actually let you break into the method call chain that's gone too deep.

set_trace_func proc { |event, file, line, id, proc_binding, classname|
  if !$pried && proc_binding && proc_binding.eval( "caller.size" ) > 200
    $pried = true
    proc_binding.pry
  end
}
  • interesting, didn't try it but is an interesting debugging technique – akostadinov Sep 29 '14 at 17:14
  • So, this is similar to the above, but you end up in a pry session as if you stopped at a breakpoint? (vs. throwing an exception) – Gerry Gleason May 20 '15 at 13:52
3

You can get this kind of stack trace with Ruby 1.8. If the presence of 1.9 style syntax (eg {foo: 42}) is the only issue, then compile Ruby 1.8 head.

  • 1
    Can you elaborate on why this doesn't work in 1.9? I can't find any other reference to that being the case or why... – Bo Jeanes Mar 26 '13 at 21:59
  • @bjeanes I can't really remember, but I may have been thinking of how assert_nothing_raised differs in behavior between 1.8 and 1.9, which is probably a test/unit versus minitest thing. – Andrew Grimm Mar 26 '13 at 22:04
1

I tried many of the things here, but could not find where the recursion was (I am using Ruby 2.0).

Then, I tried "the stupid thing". I ran the problem code (in my case, unit tests) in Terminal, and then pressed Ctrl-C when I thought the offensive test was running (a few puts calls helped). Sure enough, I got a full backtrace :)

I had a full 3 or 4 seconds to respond on a 2013 Macbook Pro.

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