67

I want to write a program that:

  • 80% of the time will say sendMessage("hi");
  • 5% of the time will say sendMessage("bye");
  • and 15% of the time will say sendMessage("Test");

Does it have to do something with Math.random()? like

if (Math.random() * 100 < 80) {
  sendMessage("hi");
}
else if (Math.random() * 100 < 5) {
  sendMessage("bye");
}
5
  • 7
    hmmm ... that adds up to 145%.
    – john.k.doe
    Jul 19, 2012 at 0:07
  • 1
    it's possible, if you look at it as if he has three chances to say something or nothing; once 90%, once 50% and once 5%
    – Tom
    Jul 19, 2012 at 0:09
  • its definetly not impossible , its like a scrolling add that give greater priority to certain ads, you could do something like an array where there are 100 items , 40 are a, 30 are b , and 30 are c , then randomly choose one, just not 90%, 50%, and 5% - rethink your math Jul 19, 2012 at 0:10
  • @Tom: as in, it is possible for it to say "hi bye test"? The code uses else if, not a simple if, so I doubt that's a real option, but still, good catch.
    – sarnold
    Jul 19, 2012 at 0:10
  • now that it no longer says 145%, either the solutions below that suggest calling random once and using the result would be the way to accomplish this.
    – john.k.doe
    Jul 19, 2012 at 0:14

7 Answers 7

80

Yes, Math.random() is an excellent way to accomplish this. What you want to do is compute a single random number, and then make decisions based on that:

var d = Math.random();
if (d < 0.5)
    // 50% chance of being here
else if (d < 0.7)
    // 20% chance of being here
else
    // 30% chance of being here

That way you don't miss any possibilities.

12
  • 4
    The key point to make is that you should generate and use ONE random number.
    – Stephen C
    Jul 19, 2012 at 0:40
  • 4
    @user2537537 -- the first line declares (and defines) a Java double-precision floating-point variable; that's just the correct Java syntax for declaring a variable. Jan 21, 2015 at 12:55
  • 2
    Wait, shouldn't it be "<= 0.5" instead of "< 0.5", because how it is now is 49% chance, not 50%. Jan 20, 2017 at 20:36
  • 2
    @DysanixOfficial Not 49% -- more like 49.999999999... which, as any mathematician can tell you, is pretty much 50%. But sure -- <= would be correct too. Jan 20, 2017 at 22:38
  • 3
    @DysanixOfficial it should be < .5, because random can return 0, but cannot return 1. When you write <= .5, you're defining these ranges: (0 ; .5) and (0.5+0.(1) ; 0.(9) ). So you have 0.500...01% for true and 0.4999...9% for false
    – Fen1kz
    Mar 22, 2018 at 15:31
21

For cases like this it is usually best to generate one random number and select the case based on that single number, like so:

int foo = Math.random() * 100;
if (foo < 80) // 0-79
    sendMessage("hi");
else if (foo < 85) // 80-84
    sendMessage("bye");
else // 85-99
    sendMessage("test");
0
4

I made a percentage chance function by creating a pool and using the fisher yates shuffle algorithm for a completely random chance. The snippet below tests the chance randomness 20 times.

var arrayShuffle = function(array) {
   for ( var i = 0, length = array.length, swap = 0, temp = ''; i < length; i++ ) {
      swap        = Math.floor(Math.random() * (i + 1));
      temp        = array[swap];
      array[swap] = array[i];
      array[i]    = temp;
   }
   return array;
};

var percentageChance = function(values, chances) {
   for ( var i = 0, pool = []; i < chances.length; i++ ) {
      for ( var i2 = 0; i2 < chances[i]; i2++ ) {
         pool.push(i);
      }
   }
   return values[arrayShuffle(pool)['0']];
};

for ( var i = 0; i < 20; i++ ) {
   console.log(percentageChance(['hi', 'test', 'bye'], [80, 15, 5]));
}

1

I do this all the time with my discord bots

const a = Math.floor(Math.random() * 11);
    if (a >= 8) { // 20% chance
        /*
          CODE HERE
        */
    } else { // 80% chance
        /*
          CODE HERE
        */
    }

You can change 11 to 101 if you want.

The reason why it has an extra one is so it does 1 - 10 instead of 1 - 9 (or 1 - 100 instead of 1 - 99)

0

Generate a 20% chance to get "Yupiii!" in the console.log

const testMyChance = () => {

  const chance = [1, 0, 0, 0, 0].sort(() => Math.random() - 0.5)[0]

  if(chance) console.log("Yupiii!")
  else console.log("Oh my Duck!")
}

testMyChance()
-1

Java

/**
 * Zero or less returns 'false', 100 or greater returns 'true'. Else return probability with required percentage.
 * @param percentage for example 100%, 50%, 0%.
 * @return true or false with required probability.
 */
private static boolean probably(int percentage) {
    double zeroToOne = Math.random(); // greater than or equal to 0.0 and less than 1.0
    double multiple = zeroToOne * 100; // greater than or equal to 0.0 and less than 100.0
    return multiple < percentage;
}

JavaScript

function probably(percentage) {
  return Math.random() * 100 < percentage;
}
-3

Here is a very simple approximate solution to the problem. Sort an array of true/false values randomly and then pick the first item.

This should give a 1 in 3 chance of being true..

var a = [true, false, false]
a.sort(function(){ return Math.random() >= 0.5 ? 1 : -1 })[0]
2
  • Array.prptotype.sort may call the sort function more than once with the same arguments. If you want the probability to be exactly 1/3 you need to make your sort function idempotent. Jun 27, 2018 at 7:30
  • @chris-browne I did say that it's an "approximates solution" but I will make the fix so that it's closer to 1/3. Thanks for the input.
    – seanbehan
    Jun 27, 2018 at 23:24

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