Do I need to do this:

+(void)initialize{
     ...my stuff...
  [super initialize];
 }

That is to say, if I am over-riding initialize from the parent class (NSObject) in my App Delegate, to I need to make sure the super implementation also gets called? Or does that not apply since this is not an instance method?

Just how "safe" is this method? I'm implementing the iNotify library and the documentation suggests adding the setup to this method, but I've not previously used it for anything in the app, and want to know also if it can potentially conflict with something else unexpectedly?

  • 4
    The docs say nothing about needing to call super. In fact, they state that this message is only called exactly once (if the class is used) per run, and that superclasses' initialize methods are guaranteed to be called before subclasses'. You would break the first behavior by calling super. – fzwo Jul 19 '12 at 7:18
  • Your '+initialize' method should be calling an instance method such as '-init'. It is in '-init' that you want to be calling 'super'. '+' methods are class methods and are used as convenience methods, and should be calling instance methods, then returning the instance. An example of this is '[UIColor colorWithRed:Green:Blue:Alpha:]'. – David Skrundz Jul 19 '12 at 7:27
  • 1
    @NSArray i'm not convinced I need to call init inside initialize if I have not myself written any init method in the class, thus it is using the super's init anyway. – johnbakers Jul 19 '12 at 7:38
  • 1
    +initialize is a "static" initializer, called once when the class is created (usually the first time it is used). You do not have to (and you also can't) call -init and return an object. Usually I use +initialize in my app delegate to initialize my "default" NSUserDefaults – Francesco Jul 19 '12 at 7:41
up vote 7 down vote accepted

if you have subclasses of this class you better call your code using dispatch_once statement because each sublcass will call this method again

+(void)initialize
{
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^
    {
        //Your Code
    });
}

See this blog post by Mike Ash for details.

  • 1
    No, the NSObject Class Reference says: "initialize is invoked only once per class". – Martin R Jul 19 '12 at 7:52
  • 1
    If the class doesn't implement it, the superclass's +initialize will run instead! If you don't believe me go on and test it. And read Mike Ash artticle mikeash.com/pyblog/…! – Denis Mikhaylov Jul 19 '12 at 8:03
  • 1
    Not sure why you were downvoted. This is correct. dipatch_once is a good solution, or at least checking if self == [yourclass class]. – D.C. Jul 19 '12 at 8:08
  • From doc: "The runtime sends initialize to each class in a program exactly one time just before the class, or any class that inherits from it, is sent its first message from within the program. (Thus the method may never be invoked if the class is not used.) The runtime sends the initialize message to classes in a thread-safe manner. Superclasses receive this message before their subclasses." ... so.. it is invoked only once! If you have three classes A, B and C, with B and C are A subclasses, then the initialize method of A is called only once, either because A is used, or B or C... – Francesco Jul 19 '12 at 8:17
  • 2
    The statement "The runtime sends initialize to each class in a program exactly one time" can be misinterpreted, at least it was by me! If B is subclass of A, then +initialize is sent to A only once. But it is also sent to B once, and if B does not override +initialize, then [B initialize] will call the method implemented in A, so that the method is called twice (but for different classes). – Martin R Jul 19 '12 at 8:39

The runtime sends initialize to each class in a program just before the class, or any class that inherits from it, is sent its first message from within the program. The runtime sends the initialize message to classes in a thread-safe manner. Superclasses receive this message before their subclasses. The superclass implementation may be called multiple times if subclasses do not implement initialize—the runtime will call the inherited implementation—or if subclasses explicitly call [super initialize]. If you want to protect yourself from being run multiple times, you can structure your implementation along these lines:

https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/cocoa/reference/foundation/classes/nsobject_class/reference/reference.html#//apple_ref/occ/clm/NSObject/initialize

Thus making both

+ (void)initialize
{
    ...
}

and

+ (void)initialize
{
    [super initialize];

    ...
}

valid.

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