88

I am trying to write a function which basically converts an array of strings to an array of strings where all the doubles in the array are rounded to the number of decimalplaces i set. There can also be strings in the array which are no double values at all.

string[,] values = new string[1, 3];

values[0, 0] = "hello";
values[0, 1] = "0.123";
values[0, 2] = "0,123";

int decimalPlaces = 2;

double tmp;
string format = "F" + decimalPlaces.ToString();
IFormatProvider provider = CultureInfo.InvariantCulture;
for (int i = 0; i < values.GetLength(0); i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < values.GetLength(1); j++)
    {
        if (double.TryParse(values[i, j], out tmp))
        {
            values[i, j] = tmp.ToString(format, provider);
        }
    }
}

Console.ReadLine();

The result has to be: "hello" , "0.12", "0.12" but it is "hello", "123.00", "0.12" will treat the comma in the wrong way. Does anyone have a simple and efficient solution for this?

1
  • 2
    As hultqvist pointed out in a comment, the currently accepted answer breaks if the current culture uses a dot "." as a decimal point! So, would you mind changing the accepted answer to the most upvoted one?
    – Stefnotch
    Nov 13, 2018 at 16:03

14 Answers 14

180

To treat both , and . as decimal point you must not only replace one with the other, but also make sure the Culture used parsing interprets it as a decimal point.

text = text.Replace(',', '.');
return double.TryParse(text, NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out value);
4
  • This might lead to some issues with thousand separators.
    – Retic
    May 14, 2020 at 12:32
  • @Retic Indeed, what is a thousand separator for one culture is the decimal separator for another.
    – hultqvist
    May 15, 2020 at 9:54
  • @hultqvist I presume that in Latin Spanish culture '1,000' will be replaced to '1'. And '1000' was expected. Jul 16, 2020 at 15:42
  • 3
    @alan-mattano this solution is for a specific problem. There is no single solution for all cultures, you have to first detect which culture is in use and then choose algorithm accordingly.
    – hultqvist
    Jul 18, 2020 at 4:12
59

You DO NOT NEED to replace the comma and dot..

I have had the very same problem. The reason is simple, the conversion culture plays a big role in which the comma or a dot is interpreted. I use a German culture where the comma distinguish the fractions, where as elsewhere the dot does the job.

Here I made a complete example to make the difference clear.

string[] doubleStrings = {"hello", "0.123", "0,123"};
double localCultreResult;
foreach (var doubleString in doubleStrings)
{
    double.TryParse(doubleString, NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out localCultreResult);
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Local culture results for the parsing of {0} is {1}", doubleString, localCultreResult));
}

double invariantCultureResult;
foreach (var doubleString in doubleStrings)
{
    double.TryParse(doubleString, NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out invariantCultureResult);
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Invariant culture results for the parsing of {0} is {1}", doubleString, invariantCultureResult));
}

The results is the following: enter image description here

Play around with the culture and you will get the result you need.

3
  • I tried this solution on few PCs with different culture settings. It doesnt work as expected. I will post another solution later. Nov 8, 2016 at 3:11
  • I tried this but it doesnt work for me. please see the image in the link. CurrentCulture parameter is German there. imgur.com/QvtPt7S
    – Emil
    Oct 9, 2017 at 0:49
  • 2
    This should be the accepted answer. You can use NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint as second parameter as well if you need to be more restrictive. That worked fine for me!
    – Matt
    Sep 9, 2019 at 14:59
29

You want to treat dot (.) like comma (,). So, replace

if (double.TryParse(values[i, j], out tmp))

with

if (double.TryParse(values[i, j].Replace('.', ','), out tmp))
4
  • 45
    You need to specify culture when parsing, otherwise it will only work where the current culture use "," as decimal point.
    – hultqvist
    Oct 30, 2013 at 9:39
  • 1
    Right. Thanks for the warning.
    – mmdemirbas
    Oct 30, 2013 at 9:44
  • 4
    I know that the thread is long dead, but I would replace Replace(string, string) with replace(char, char) for better performance..... Feb 22, 2016 at 9:11
  • 4
    Replacing is bad idea, as app on the PC with another culture settings will fail... I will write better fix later. Nov 8, 2016 at 3:12
18

The problem is that you (or the system) cannot distinguish a decimal separator from a thousands separator when they can be both a comma or dot. For example:

In my culture,

1.123 is a normal notation for a number above 1000; whereas

1,123 is a number near 1.

Using the invariant culture defaults to using the dot as a decimal separator. In general you should ensure that all numbers are written using the same constant culture on all systems (e.g. the invariant culture).

If you are sure that your numbers never contain anything other than a comma or dot for a decimal separator (i.e. no thousands separators), I'd String.Replace() the comma with a dot and do the rest as you did.

Otherwise, you'll have a hard time programming something that can distinguish 1.123 from 1,123 without knowing the culture.

2
  • Agreed, for me this is the most logical solution. You could also check if the strings contain a "," or "." but either one of these solutions should be fine imo.
    – eandersson
    Jul 19, 2012 at 12:15
  • 1
    "... on all systems ..." is far beyond my span of control. Oct 12, 2018 at 7:55
6

Make two static cultures, one for comma and one for point.

    var commaCulture = new CultureInfo("en")
    {
        NumberFormat =
        {
            NumberDecimalSeparator = ","
        }
    };

    var pointCulture = new CultureInfo("en")
    {
        NumberFormat =
        {
            NumberDecimalSeparator = "."
        }
    };

Then use each one respectively, depending on the input (using a function):

    public double ConvertToDouble(string input)
    {
        input = input.Trim();

        if (input == "0") {
            return 0;
        }

        if (input.Contains(",") && input.Split(',').Length == 2)
        {
            return Convert.ToDouble(input, commaCulture);
        }

        if (input.Contains(".") && input.Split('.').Length == 2)
        {
            return Convert.ToDouble(input, pointCulture);
        }

        throw new Exception("Invalid input!");
    }

Then loop through your arrays

    var strings = new List<string> {"0,12", "0.122", "1,23", "00,0", "0.00", "12.5000", "0.002", "0,001"};
    var doubles = new List<double>();

    foreach (var value in strings) {
        doubles.Add(ConvertToDouble(value));
    }

This should work even though the host environment and culture changes.

3
  • 1
    Not really, if you have 1,000,000.20 it fails
    – IggyBar
    Jan 12, 2021 at 1:30
  • Or "1000" fails
    – Sahin
    Apr 29 at 12:06
  • Thanks! This one works for me. But an exception happens when string doesnt contains "." or ",", but only digits. Small fix helps.
    – Mikhail Kh
    Jun 3 at 6:43
4

Simple use:

double.Parse("3.5", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)
1
1

Use this overload of double.TryParse to specify allowed formats:

Double.TryParse Method (String, NumberStyles, IFormatProvider, Double%)

By default, double.TryParse will parse based on current culture specific formats.

1

Extension to parse decimal number from string.

  • No matter number will be on the beginning, in the end, or in the middle of a string.
  • No matter if there will be only number or lot of "garbage" letters.
  • No matter what is delimiter configured in the cultural settings on the PC: it will parse dot and comma both correctly.
  • Ability to set decimal symbol manually.

    public static class StringExtension
    {
        public static double DoubleParseAdvanced(this string strToParse, char decimalSymbol = ',')
        {
            string tmp = Regex.Match(strToParse, @"([-]?[0-9]+)([\s])?([0-9]+)?[." + decimalSymbol + "]?([0-9 ]+)?([0-9]+)?").Value;
    
            if (tmp.Length > 0 && strToParse.Contains(tmp))
            {
                var currDecSeparator = System.Windows.Forms.Application.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator;
    
                tmp = tmp.Replace(".", currDecSeparator).Replace(decimalSymbol.ToString(), currDecSeparator);
    
                return double.Parse(tmp);
            }
    
            return 0;
        }
    }
    

How to use:

"It's 4.45 O'clock now".DoubleParseAdvanced(); // will return 4.45
"It's 4,45 O'clock now".DoubleParseAdvanced(); // will return 4.45
"It's 4:45 O'clock now".DoubleParseAdvanced(':'); // will return 4.45
5
  • 2
    4:45 should be equal to 4.75 :P
    – Logman
    Feb 12, 2018 at 18:49
  • For non winforms apps use: var currDecSeparator = Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator;
    – Per G
    May 12, 2018 at 11:23
  • 1
    This does not work when you use '.' as the decimalSymbol parameter. Assert.AreEqual(4.45d, DoubleParseAdvanced("4.45", '.')); return 445 if your currentCulture.NumberDecimalSeperator is a ','. Mar 3, 2020 at 8:22
  • yep, you're right. Need to update code. Maybe later will do Mar 3, 2020 at 15:22
  • This you test this in both cultures '.' and ',' ? Jul 16, 2020 at 15:33
1

For me using the culture info was not an option, since the app was running on systems with different cultures but the input strings to be parsed where of unknown culture.

So I referred to normalizing the string representation and then converting it using CultureInfo.InvariantCulture:

    private static double NormalizeAndParse(string strDouble)
    {
        string strDoubleNormalized;

        if (strDouble.Contains(","))
        {
            var strReplaced = strDouble.Replace(",", ".");
            var decimalSeparatorPos = strReplaced.LastIndexOf('.');
            var strInteger = strReplaced.Substring(0, decimalSeparatorPos);
            var strFractional = strReplaced.Substring(decimalSeparatorPos);

            strInteger = strInteger.Replace(".", string.Empty);
            strDoubleNormalized = strInteger + strFractional;
        }
        else
        {
            strDoubleNormalized = strDouble;
        }

        return Double.Parse(strDoubleNormalized, NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }
0

You can check if the string contains a decimal point using

string s="";

        if (s.Contains(','))
        { 
        //treat as double how you wish
        }

and then treat that as a decimal, otherwise just pass the non-double value along.

0

Another option would be to use the information on the decimal separator from CultureInfo class. Knowing that we can replace ',' with '.' or vice versa when needed. A number grouping symbol is also available in this class if something needs to be done with a number like 1,000,000.23.

string decimalSeparator = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberDecimalSeparator;
        string value = "";

        if (decimalSeparator == ".")
        {
            value = rateLimitTextBox.Text.Replace(",", ".");
        }
        else if (decimalSeparator == ",")
        {
            value = rateLimitTextBox.Text.Replace(".", ",");
        }

        bool LimitAcceptable = decimal.TryParse(value, NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out decimal limit);
0

I use the following snippet if I want to parse a number with a decimal separator and nothing else:

public bool TryParseDecimal(string value, out decimal result) {
    const string your_separator = ",";

    var numberFormat = new NumberFormatInfo {
            NumberDecimalSeparator = your_separator
    };

    return decimal.TryParse(value, NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint, numberFormat, out result);
}

I don't think that using a culture or string manipulation expresses the intention of convertig a number with a non '.' decimal point.

0

First of all, I would like to thank Sinipelto.

Here is just a small improvements of his answer

First I decide to declare cultural as static, and took in consideration case when you have value without comma or dot. Hope this saves few seconds for someone

        public static CultureInfo pointCulture = new CultureInfo("en")
    {
        NumberFormat =
            {
                NumberDecimalSeparator = "."
            }
    };

    public static CultureInfo commaCulture = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en")
    {
        NumberFormat =
            {
                NumberDecimalSeparator = ","
            }
    };

    private double ConvertToDouble(string input)
    {
        input = input.Trim();

        if (!input.Contains(",") && !input.Contains(".")) 
        {
            return double.Parse(input);
        }

        if (input.Contains(",") && input.Split(',').Length == 2)
        {
            return Convert.ToDouble(input, commaCulture);
        }

        if (input.Contains(".") && input.Split('.').Length == 2)
        {
            return Convert.ToDouble(input, pointCulture);
        }

        throw new Exception("Invalid input!");
    }
-1

try this... it works for me.

double vdouble = 0;
string sparam = "2,1";

if ( !Double.TryParse( sparam, NumberStyles.Float, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out vdouble ) )
{
    if ( sparam.IndexOf( '.' ) != -1 )
    {
        sparam = sparam.Replace( '.', ',' );
    }
    else
    {
        sparam = sparam.Replace( ',', '.' );
    }

    if ( !Double.TryParse( sparam, NumberStyles.Float, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out vdouble ) )
    {
        vdouble = 0;
    }
}
0

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