35

I want to check is a function exists in a library that I am creating, which is static. I've seen function and method_exists, but haven't found a way that allows me to call them in a relative context. Here is a better example:

class myClass{
    function test1()
    {
        if(method_exists("myClass", "test1"))
        {
            echo "Hi";
        }
    }
    function test2()
    {
        if(method_exists($this, "test2"))
        {
            echo "Hi";
        }
    }
    function test3()
    {
        if(method_exists(self, "test3"))
        {
            echo "Hi";
        }
    }
}
// Echos Hi
myClass::test1();
// Trys to use 'self' as a string instead of a constant
myClass::test3();
// Echos Hi
$obj = new myClass;
$obj->test2();

I need to be able to make test 3 echo Hi if the function exists, without needing to take it out of static context. Given the keyword for accessing the class should be 'self', as $this is for assigned classes.

  • Why isn't the test1() method sufficient? – gapple Jul 21 '09 at 0:19
  • Because I want to put this into a class that will be extended by multiple classes. I could use a magic constant to achieve this, but there should be an easier way. – Tyler Carter Jul 21 '09 at 0:31
55

static::class is available since PHP 5.5, and will return the "Late Static Binding" class name:

class myClass {
    public static function test()
    {
        echo static::class.'::test()';
    }
}

class subClass extends myClass {}

subClass::test() // should print "subClass::test()"

get_called_class() does the same, and was introduced in PHP 5.3

class myClass {
    public static function test()
    {
        echo get_called_class().'::test()';
    }
}

class subClass extends myClass {}

subClass::test() // should print "subClass::test()"

The get_class() function, which as of php 5.0.0 does not require any parameters if called within a class will return the name of the class in which the function was declared (e.g., the parent class):

class myClass {
    public static function test()
    {
        echo get_class().'::test()';
    }
}

class subClass extends myClass {}

subClass::test() // prints "myClass::test()"

The __CLASS__ magic constant does the same [link].

class myClass {
    public static function test()
    {
        echo __CLASS__.'::test()';
    }
}

class subClass extends myClass {}

subClass::test() // prints "myClass::test()"
  • 1
    Thank You! That was exactly what I was looking for. – Tyler Carter Jul 21 '09 at 1:11
  • I was looking for a way to check if a static method exists on the parent class, and this answer led me to discover that get_parent_class() works the same way when called without any params. Thanks! – mopo922 May 4 '16 at 5:10
  • 2
    Just a note static::class does the same as get_called_class() and self::class does the same as get_class() but they are only available since PHP 5.5 – Tofandel Jul 17 '18 at 9:37
2

Update:

Ahh, apologies. I was temporarily blind :) You'll want to use the magic constant __CLASS__

e.g.

if (method_exists(__CLASS__, "test3")) { echo "Hi"; }
  • 1
    this answer seems to be the same as the question example's test1() method using method_exists() with the class name passed as a string – gapple Jul 21 '09 at 0:21
  • The idea is that I don't need a class name, and I can therefore put the method in any class, and it should work, whether the class has been assigned or not. – Tyler Carter Jul 21 '09 at 0:27
  • You mean from the comments that I 'just' put on the main question? – Tyler Carter Jul 21 '09 at 0:35
  • I don't understand the question. I see you updated your comment in the OP with: "I could use a magic constant to achieve this, but there should be an easier way." I did not see this before I updated my answer. What is not easy enough about the given method? – hobodave Jul 21 '09 at 0:39
  • 1
    If extensibility is your goal, it should be noted that __CLASS__, __TRAIT__, __FILE__, etc explicitly returns the name of the class/trait/file where the constant is used, whereas if you want to account for child objects, you will want get_class($this) for instantiated objects, or get_called_class() for static classes/methods to track inheritance. Then you can drop one function in a trait or base class and use it everywhere, thereby preventing code duplication issues, and use instanceof [trait, parent class, or interface] or method_exists() for validation without duplicate code. – mopsyd Sep 20 '17 at 18:58
-1

for all situations… the best usage would be…

if method_exist(…) && is_callable(…)

For testing example:

class Foo {
  public function PublicMethod() {}
  private function PrivateMethod() {}
  public static function PublicStaticMethod() {}
  private static function PrivateStaticMethod() {}
}

$foo = new Foo();

$callbacks = array(
  array($foo, 'PublicMethod'),
  array($foo, 'PrivateMethod'),
  array($foo, 'PublicStaticMethod'),
  array($foo, 'PrivateStaticMethod'),
  array('Foo', 'PublicMethod'),
  array('Foo', 'PrivateMethod'),
  array('Foo', 'PublicStaticMethod'),
  array('Foo', 'PrivateStaticMethod'),
);

foreach ($callbacks as $callback) {
  var_dump($callback);
  var_dump(method_exists($callback[0], $callback[1])); // 0: object / class name, 1: method name
  var_dump(is_callable($callback));
  echo str_repeat('-', 40), "n";
}

Source here

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