36

I would like to implement an Iterator in Java that behaves somewhat like the following generator function in Python:

def iterator(array):
   for x in array:
      if x!= None:
        for y in x:
          if y!= None:
            for z in y:
              if z!= None:
                yield z

x on the java side can be multi-dimensional array or some form of nested collection. I am not sure how this would work. Ideas?

  • 2
    So, basically you want to iterate over the values in z-dimension? – JHollanti Jul 19 '12 at 22:26
  • Yes and optionally with some predicate filter like shown. – Eqbal Jul 19 '12 at 22:43
  • Why don't you use recursion? – cybertextron Jul 20 '12 at 0:03
  • 1
    I'm a bit too lazy to write a response right at the moment, but basically you'd need a custom iterator. – JHollanti Jul 22 '12 at 21:59
  • 4
    BTW, you could also write this as (z for x in array if x is not None for y in x if y is not None for z in y if z is not None) – tobias_k Jul 31 '14 at 14:26
42

Had the same need so wrote a little class for it. Here are some examples:

Generator<Integer> simpleGenerator = new Generator<Integer>() {
    public void run() throws InterruptedException {
        yield(1);
        // Some logic here...
        yield(2);
    }
};
for (Integer element : simpleGenerator)
    System.out.println(element);
// Prints "1", then "2".

Infinite generators are also possible:

Generator<Integer> infiniteGenerator = new Generator<Integer>() {
    public void run() throws InterruptedException {
        while (true)
            yield(1);
    }
};

The Generator class internally works with a Thread to produce the items. By overriding finalize(), it ensures that no Threads stay around if the corresponding Generator is no longer used.

The performance is obviously not great but not too shabby either. On my machine with a dual core i5 CPU @ 2.67 GHz, 1000 items can be produced in < 0.03s.

The code is on GitHub. There, you'll also find instructions on how to include it as a Maven/Gradle dependency.

  • Do you have your implementation of generator on maven repo? – nosmo Sep 18 '14 at 10:31
  • 1
    Not yet. If I create one I'll let you know here. – Michael Herrmann Sep 18 '14 at 13:15
  • I've initiated the process of having the code published on Maven Central and am waiting to be authorized by the Maven Central operators. – Michael Herrmann Sep 18 '14 at 14:28
  • 1
    The code is now on GitHub and published on a public Maven repository. I've updated my answer above. – Michael Herrmann Mar 18 '15 at 16:40
  • You use ThreadGroup. Perhaps you could refactor considering Item 73 of Effective Java: "Avoid thread groups" – Maroloccio Oct 23 '15 at 11:53
17

Indeed Java has no yield, but you can now use Java 8 streams. IMO it's really a complicated iterator since it's backed by an array, not a function. Given it's a loop in a loop in a loop can be expressed as a Stream using filter (to skip the nulls) and flatMap to stream the inner collection. It's also about the size of the Python code. I've converted it to an iterator to use at your leisure and printed to demonstrate, but if all you were doing was printing, you could end the stream sequence with forEach(System.out::println) instead of iterator().

public class ArrayIterate
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Integer[][][] a = new Integer[][][] { { { 1, 2, null, 3 },
                                                null,
                                                { 4 }
                                              },
                                              null,
                                              { { 5 } } };

        Iterator<Object> iterator = Arrays.stream(a)
                                          .filter(ax -> ax != null)
                                          .flatMap(ax -> Arrays.stream(ax)
                                               .filter(ay -> ay != null)
                                               .flatMap(ay -> Arrays.stream(ay)
                                               .filter(az -> az != null)))
                                          .iterator();

        while (iterator.hasNext())
        {
            System.out.println(iterator.next());
        }
    }
}

I'm writing about implementation of generators as part of my blog on Java 8 Functional Programming and Lambda Expressions at http://thecannycoder.wordpress.com/ which might give you some more ideas for converting Python generator functions into Java equivalents.

  • 8
    You can filter(Objects::nonNull) instead of writing a new lambda for that. – Jon O Feb 23 '15 at 21:07
  • @Jon O, both of those parameters take sixteen characters and will have the same runtime performance, but the version in the answer arguably is clearer and doesn't require an additional import. – Lucas Ross Dec 8 '18 at 0:11
  • It's a stdlib import, so I don't really count that against it, but the answer is writing it 3x for three different named params (which might create three different lambda classes?). Also my way doesn't have to worry about lambda param name collisions. =) – Jon O Jan 9 at 19:19
6

I wish Java had generator/yield, but since it doesn't using Iterators is probably your best bet.

In this example I stuck with arrays, but in general I would advise using Iterable Collection instead, eg. List. In the example I show how it's pretty easy to get iterators for arrays though:

package example.stackoverflow;

import com.sun.xml.internal.xsom.impl.scd.Iterators;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Iterator;

public class ArrayGenerator<T> implements Iterable<T> {
    private final T[][][] input;

    public ArrayGenerator(T[][][] input) {
        this.input = input;
    }


    @Override
    public Iterator<T> iterator() {
        return new Iter();
    }

    private class Iter implements Iterator<T> {
        private Iterator<T[][]> x;
        private Iterator<T[]> y;
        private Iterator<T> z;

        {
            x = Arrays.asList(input).iterator();
            y = Iterators.empty();
            z = Iterators.empty();
        }

        @Override
        public boolean hasNext() {
            return z.hasNext() || y.hasNext() || x.hasNext();
        }

        @Override
        public T next() {
            while(! z.hasNext()) {
                while(! y.hasNext()) {
                    y = Arrays.asList(x.next()).iterator();
                }
                z = Arrays.asList(y.next()).iterator();
            }
            return z.next();
        }

        @Override
        public void remove() {
            throw new UnsupportedOperationException("remove not supported");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for(Integer i :
                new ArrayGenerator<Integer>(
                        new Integer[][][]{
                          {
                            {1, 2, 3},
                            {4, 5}
                          },
                          {
                            {},
                            {6}
                          },
                          {
                          },
                          {
                            {7, 8, 9, 10, 11}
                          }
                        }
                )) {
            System.out.print(i + ", ");
        }
    }
}
4

There is no yield in Java, so you have to do all these things for yourself, ending up with ridiculous code as this one:

    for(Integer z : new Iterable<Integer>() {

        @Override
        public Iterator<Integer> iterator() {

            return new Iterator<Integer>() {

                final Integer[][][] d3 = 
                        { { { 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 5, 6 }, { 7, 8, 9 } },
                        { { 10, 11, 12 }, { 13, 14, 15 }, { 16, 17, 18 } },
                        { { 19, 20, 21 }, { 22, 23, 24 }, { 25, 26, 27 } } };

                int x = 0; 
                int y = 0; 
                int z = 0;

                @Override
                public boolean hasNext() {
                    return !(x==3 && y == 3 && z == 3);
                }

                @Override
                public Integer next() {
                    Integer result = d3[z][y][x];
                    if (++x == 3) {
                        x = 0;
                        if (++y == 3) {
                            y = 0;
                            ++z;
                        }
                    }
                    return result;
                }

                @Override
                public void remove() {
                    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
                }
            };
        }
    }) {
        System.out.println(z);
    }

But if your sample would have more than one single yield it would end up even worse.

1

The translation from Python-style generators to Java-style iterators can be automated. If you're willing to accept code generation in your build process, you might be interested in this prototype tool that does the translation for you:

https://github.com/Calvin-L/gen2it

-1

No, Java does not have "generators" or "yield" per-se, but the same functionality is available by using the Observer Pattern. This is enhanced when using a modern implementation like RxJava. Your code would subscribe to the Obserable and whenever it tries to read the next value from the Observable it would cause it "generate" it's next value. The Observable can maintain it's own state just like a generator for Python or JavaScript. When there are no new values to be read, the "next()" method will block waiting on new data to be available. A good example of this can be found HERE.

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