class MathOperations{
 public:
 void Message();
 void setSum(int);
 void setSuB(int);
 void setMul(int);
 void setDiv(int);
 void setSqrt(int);
 int getSum();
 int getSub();
 int getMul();
 int getDiv();
 int getSqrt();
private:
int sum, subtract, multiply, divide, sqrt;

is there a better way of using setter and getter in a class??? if there's any please give me some examples. im just trying to learn a little bit more about class so im trying to implement my knowledge even though im just a beginner.. i read in a book that is it better to use static methods and use the keyword this but not sure how that works.. any simple advice will be grateful appreciate.

  • 1
    Define "better". – Mysticial Jul 20 '12 at 3:59
  • looks good for me – Jeeva Jul 20 '12 at 4:00
  • 2
    It would help if you stated what problem you're trying to solve here. – kprobst Jul 20 '12 at 4:00
  • by better i meant more efficient.. if u see the class i just built it has a bunch of setter and getters.. im just curious if that can be done differently and will not use that much computer memory.. allowing the program to run smooth and quick – user1535963 Jul 20 '12 at 4:02
  • 1
    is there a better way of using setter and getter in a class??? Yes, clearly, not using setter and getters at all. Besides that, applying const-correctness will be an improvement (even on the bad idea that getter and setters are). – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 20 '12 at 4:08

If the class is just a bunch of simple setters/getters I would consider making a struct (they are almost the same as class, but in case of public variables I prefere to name it struct) with public variables. But in any case if your methods are that simple compiler will probably inline them.

Also don't optimize the code until you found a bottleneck

class MathOperations{
    public:
    void Message();
    void setA(int);
    void setB(int);
    int getA();
    ing getB();
    int getSum();
    int getSub();
    int getMul();
    double getDiv();
    double getSqrt();
    private:
    int a, b;

Instead of storing the values for sum, sub, mul, and divide you want to set A and B then calculate the answers. Also, divide should return a double or float unless you are anticipating truncation. What I mean by this is if you have getDiv() return an int and a=1 and b=2 it will return 0 (1/2 = 0.5 which truncates to 0), if you are looking for a nice floating point answer you should be using a double or float.

Here is an example implementation of getDiv():

double MathOperations::getDiv() {
    double tempa = (double)this->a;
    double tempb = (double)this->b;
    return tempa/tempb;
}

As far as optimising your current example goes, if you are doing something like the following:

class foo {
    public:
    void setA(int);
    void setB(int);
    int getA();
    int getB();

    private:
    int A,B;
}

The only true overhead you are getting (assuming the compiler doesn't optimise this code) is you add a function call to the stack when getting or setting the variable and pop it off when done and making a copy of the variable to return. This is negligible on modern computers.

EDIT:double tempa = (double)this->a There is a lot going on in this little line of code, let me break it down and explain.

  1. this->a refers to the local member of the class a which is an integer. Read more about classes here: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes/
  2. (double)this->a For the math we are going to do, we want this->a to be a double so we can get a nice number like 3.141519 when doing division. To do this we cast it to a double, basically telling the compiler to convert the integer to a double in memory before storing it in tempa. Read more about data types here: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/variables/ Read more about typecasting here: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/typecasting/
  3. double tempa = here we assign the new double value from 2. to a temporary value tempa that we can use for division.

If you find cplusplus.com's tutorial a little hard to follow you can try your hand at http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c++-tutorial.html which can be a little easier to read.

  • divide can return anything is siutable for concrete case. Including int – Andrew Jul 20 '12 at 4:08
  • @Crackers That's a little bit complicate for me seem im new at this but basically you implement the method getdiv() create a new variable of type double and set = to (double)this -> a; ??? in other world to var a? – user1535963 Jul 20 '12 at 4:16
  • Yes. When used inside of a class, the this-> statement refers to a member of the class. In this example calling this->a means you are pointing to the private member a in the class. The (double) statement is typecasting the int to a double. I will update my answer with this information and add some resources for you to look at. – retrohacker Jul 20 '12 at 4:19
  • ok perfect thanks – user1535963 Jul 20 '12 at 4:24
  • Updated. Let me know if you have further questions! Happy coding :-D – retrohacker Jul 20 '12 at 4:29

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