I don't think I'm doing anything too esoteric, but I don't see any other questions about this.

The following code (I've reduced it to the essentials) generates a compiler error in C# 4. However, it should be obvious what the type argument is - there's a greatest common denominator ("class A") that is also explicitly defined in the return type of the method "Frob". Shouldn't the compiler make a list of all the return types in the lambda expression, create an ancestry tree to find their common ancestors, and then reconcile that with the expected return type of the containing method?

The type arguments for method 'System.Linq.Enumerable.Select(System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable, System.Func)' cannot be inferred from the usage. Try specifying the type arguments explicitly.

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace Sample
{
    public abstract class A
    {
        private A(int index) { /* ... */ }

        public sealed class A1 : A
        {
            public A1(string text, int index)
                : base(index)
            { /* ... */ }
        }

        public sealed class A2 : A
        {
            public A2(int index)
                : base(index)
            { /* ... */ }
        }

        private static Regex _regex = new Regex(@"(to be)|(not to be)");
        public static IEnumerable<A> Frob(string frobbable)
        {
            return _regex.Matches(frobbable)
                .Cast<Match>()
                .Select((match, i) =>
                {
                    if (match.Groups[1].Success)
                    {
                        return new A1(match.Groups[1].Value, i);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        return new A2(i);
                    }
                });
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Have you tried casting A1 and A2 to A before returning? But yeah, I can see why the compiler complains, it doesn't magically know you want the common denominator to be class A. – Nick Babcock Jul 20 '12 at 22:08
up vote 18 down vote accepted

It's section 7.5.2.12 of the C# 4 spec:

The inferred return type of an anonymous function F is used during type inference and overload resolution. The inferred return type can only be determined for an anonymous function where all parameter types are known, either because they are explicitly given, provided through an anonymous function conversion or inferred during type inference on an enclosing generic method invocation. The inferred return type is determined as follows:

  • If the body of F is an expression, then the inferred return type of F is the type of that expression.
  • If the body of F is a block and the set of expressions in the block’s return statements has a best common type T (§7.5.2.14), then the inferred return type of F is T.
  • Otherwise, a return type cannot be inferred for E.

Section 7.5.2.14 is this:

In some cases, a common type needs to be inferred for a set of expressions. In particular, the element types of implicitly typed arrays and the return types of anonymous functions with block bodies are found in this way.

Intuitively, given a set of expressions E1…Em this inference should be equivalent to calling a method

Tr M<X>(X x1 … X xm)

with the Ei as arguments.

More precisely, the inference starts out with an unfixed type variable X. Output type inferences are then made from each Ei to X. Finally, X is fixed and, if successful, the resulting type S is the resulting best common type for the expressions. If no such S exists, the expressions have no best common type.

So, suppose we have:

void M<X>(X x1, X x2) {}

A1 a1 = new A1();
A2 a2 = new A2();
M(a1, a2);

... that would fail to determine a type argument for X, so return value inference fails in the same way.

I suspect that if you cast either of your return values to A, it will work.

  • Ahh there's the C# spec. Thanks for posting that Jon. – Chris Sinclair Jul 20 '12 at 22:19
  • 1
    Very true, casting either one to "A" does work. – Lars Kemmann Jul 20 '12 at 22:30
  • So basically the spec is saying that the inference process is identical in both cases. I can see that. But it doesn't really explain what the process of "fixing X" is - that's the real problem, that the compiler isn't able to make the determination. Why can't it just pick the most specific of the possible types, if it knows that there won't be any side-effects from choosing one way ("Object)" or the other ("A)? – Lars Kemmann Jul 20 '12 at 22:32
  • @jon not sure if I'm missing something here but shouldn't the second parameter Xx2 of the function M<X> in the code example be X x2? – Fester Mar 21 at 9:15
  • 1
    @Fester: Yup, just a typo. Will fix. – Jon Skeet Mar 21 at 10:19

I'm guessing there's a specific C# specification clause somewhere that dictates this. (EDIT: Jon Skeet found it and posted them in his answer)

Usually, such lambdas (or ternary operations, etc.) require to have the same exact return type at each stage to avoid ambiguity. For example, in your case, did you want to return type A or Object? Even more fun when you throw interfaces or multiple levels of inheritance into the mix.

Best bet in this case is to simply cast each of your return statements to type A or store it in a temporary variable:

if (match.Groups[1].Success)
    return (A)(new A1(match.Groups[1].Value, i));
else
    return (A)(new A2(i));

or

A returnValue;

if (match.Groups[1].Success)
    returnValue = new A1(match.Groups[1].Value, i);
else
    returnValue = new A2(i);

return returnValue;

EDIT: If you're ok without the inferred type, you can explicitly call the Select query with:

.Cast<Match>()
.Select<Match, A>((match, i) =>
{
    if (match.Groups[1].Success)
        return new A1(match.Groups[1].Value, i);
    else
        return new A2(i);
});

Then the compiler will just make sure your return types are implicitly compatible with A (which they are)

  • No; the return types do not need to be indentical. – SLaks Jul 20 '12 at 22:17
  • 1
    @SLaks I think for type inference they do. If Lars had explicitly typed Select<Match, A>, then they can be whatever objects that can be implicitly considered as type A without explicitly casting them. – Chris Sinclair Jul 20 '12 at 22:24
  • Thanks for the helpful post - but that's just the workaround, it's not the answer to "why" I have to do what seems like unnecessary work. I'm more interested in the "why can't the compiler be smart this way" aspect. – Lars Kemmann Jul 20 '12 at 22:24
  • RE: "Select<Match, A>" - that's absolutely right. I think I'll go that route as my workaround. – Lars Kemmann Jul 20 '12 at 22:25
  • @LarsKemmann Probably various corner case conditions, ambiguity, difficulty/sanity of the C# language/compiler teams, etc. – Chris Sinclair Jul 20 '12 at 22:25

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