56

JSLint is not passing this as a valid code:

/* global someVar: false */
if (typeof someVar === "undefined") {
    var someVar = "hi!";
}

What is the correct way?

  • Note that the var is not scoped to the if block. It's as if you had written var someVar above the if. Ref: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – leewz Oct 11 '16 at 5:41
  • Went down a huge rabbit-hole after reading only the code in the answers here, and not the one in the question. If you want to write code that works on both Nodejs and the browser, this is the correct way to check if a variable is undefined, regardless of what JSLint may think about it. – Tobias Cohen Jun 14 '19 at 2:15
80
/*global window */

if (window.someVar === undefined) {
    window.someVar = 123456;
}

if (!window.hasOwnProperty('someVar')) {
    window.someVar = 123456;
}
  • 5
    Instead of /*global window */, you could use /*jslint browser: true */. – XP1 Jul 24 '12 at 23:58
  • 12
    To have the same result, the second solution should actually be if(!window.hasOwnProperty('someVar')) – Pioul Oct 11 '12 at 9:48
  • 2
    what if a the page runs this script before yours : undefined = 'some value' ? – gion_13 Nov 27 '12 at 13:11
  • 3
    Note that "window" itself is not defined in a web worker. For max compatibility, check the presence of window first. – Offirmo Oct 14 '14 at 22:54
  • 5
    @Offirmo Any thoughts on how to do that? In that case, window is a global variable, whose existence we want to check - which of course is the problem we'd like to solve in the first place. – James_pic Jul 19 '16 at 16:35
13
/**
 * @param {string} nameOfVariable
 */
function globalExists(nameOfVariable) {
    return nameOfVariable in window
}

It doesn't matter whether you created a global variable with var foo or window.foo — variables created with var in global context are written into window.

  • 4
    Of course, you don't have to use a function, you can simply use "foo" in window anywhere – gvlasov Jul 21 '12 at 22:33
  • 3
    Hrmmm, JSlint says: Unexpected 'in'. Compare with undefined, or use the hasOwnProperty method instead. Then, I guess, the right way is: window.hasOwnProperty("nameOfVar") – gvlasov Jul 22 '12 at 3:39
  • 2
    @Susei: jsLint is incorrect. The .hasOwnProperty() is faulty because there can be a global that is further down the prototype chain of window. It's still a global variable, but .hasOwnProperty() won't see it. The in or undefined tests are the way to do it. – user2437417 Jul 14 '13 at 14:22
  • This won't work in a NodeJS terminal; window is undefined there. – cst1992 Feb 7 '17 at 11:55
12

If you are wanting to assign a global variable only if it doesn't already exist, try:

window.someVar = window.someVar || 'hi';

or

window['someVar'] = window['someVar'] || 'hi';
  • This is the most elegant and cleanest solution. – Christian Dec 7 '16 at 1:05
  • This will not work as expected if the global variable is falsy. If someVar contains a value like 0 or '', it will assign 'hi' to it instead of using the existing value. – hungerstar Aug 3 '18 at 17:21
8

try

variableName in window

or

typeof window[variableName] != 'undefined'

or

window[variableName] !== undefined

or

window.hasOwnProperty(variableName)
  • 2
    Did you try to test these on JSLint? "'someVar' in window", "typeof window['someVar'] !== 'undefined'", "window['someVar'] !== undefined" (without converting it to "window.someVar !== undefined) are not Okay on JSLint. But anyway, thanks for your great answer :) – Ebrahim Byagowi Jul 22 '12 at 3:46
  • 1
    "prop" in object is absolutely legal JavaScript. Remember, JSLint is for you, not you for JSLint, and JSLint is not a JavaScript. For me if ('prop' in obj) { do_it(); } is more clear (i.e. readable and maintainable), then if (obj.prop !== undefined) { do_it(); }. I would suggest you to ignore JSLint in this case. Also see stackoverflow.com/questions/6824895/…. – kstep Nov 27 '12 at 11:44
  • You are absolutely right but I rather to keep my codes JSLint validated because it is easier to maintain. – Ebrahim Byagowi May 23 '13 at 12:51
8

I think this is actually a problem with JSLint. It will issue the following error:

Unexpected 'typeof'. Compare directly with 'undefined'.

I believe this is bad advice. In JavaScript, undefined is a global variable that is, usually, undefined. But some browsers allow scripts to modify it, like this: window.undefined = 'defined'. If this is the case, comparing directly with undefined can lead to unexpected results. Fortunately, current ECMA 5 compliant browsers do not allow assignments to undefined (and will throw an exception in strict mode).

I prefer typeof someVar === "undefined", as you posted, or someVar in window as Susei suggested.

  • 1
    Particularly relevant today because not all JS will run in a browser. If you are writing a library you want your code to work both against the browsers as well as runtimes like nodejs where window does not exist. – Chris Wininger Sep 29 '16 at 13:46
5
if (typeof someVar === "undefined") {
    var someVar = "hi!";
}

will check if someVar (local or global) is undefined.

If you want to check for a global variable you can use

if(window['someVar'] === undefined) {
    ...
}

assuming this is in a browser :)

2

bfavaretto is incorrect.

Setting the global undefined to a value will not alter tests of objects against undefined. Try this in your favorite browsers JavaScript console:

var udef; var idef = 42;
alert(udef === undefined); // Alerts "true".
alert(idef === undefined); // Alerts "false".
window.undefined = 'defined';
alert(udef === undefined); // Alerts "true".
alert(idef === undefined); // Alerts "false".

This is simply due to JavaScript ignoring all and any values attempted to be set on the undefined variable.

window.undefined = 'defined';
alert(window.undefined); // Alerts "undefined".
  • 4
    You shouldn't use the Answers section just to disprove another person's answer. If you don't think another person's answer works, either comment on their answer as to the problem(s) you foresee so they can fix it, or offer your own valid solution to the question. – Scott Sep 24 '12 at 13:03
  • 1
    This is relevant, but it doesn't answer the question. I realize this is too long to post as a comment, perhaps you could also answer the question below your disagreement? – Tim Post Sep 24 '12 at 13:50
  • 1
    You could have left a comment on my answer just to let me know you disagree, I only saw your answer by accident. You're kind of right about our "favorite browsers", the problem is that older browsers didn't prevent that. I'll edit my answer to make it more clear. – bfavaretto Oct 1 '12 at 2:58
  • Unfortunately, despite restrictions in modern browsers, undefined can still be modified: this function is perfectly legal: function foo(undefined, x) { if (x === undefined) { alert('undefined!'); } }. It will not alert if you call, for instance, foo(3). The lesson is that 'undefined' is not always a reference to the global property. – Ted Hopp Mar 3 '13 at 23:25
1

This would be a simple way to perform the check .

But this check would fail if variableName is declared and is assigned with the boolean value: false

if(window.variableName){

}
  • This does not work if variableName has any falsy value (for example emtpy string), so this might not be a sufficient solution. – Hinrich Jul 17 '19 at 8:11

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