140

I am curious why in Python a trailing comma in a list is valid syntax, and it seems that Python simply ignores it:

>>> ['a','b',]
['a', 'b']

It makes sense when its a tuple since ('a') and ('a',) are two different things, but in lists?

229
+50

The main advantages are that it makes multi-line lists easier to edit and that it reduces clutter in diffs.

Changing:

s = ['manny',
     'mo',
     'jack',
]

to:

s = ['manny',
     'mo',
     'jack',
     'roger',
]

involves only a one-line change in the diff:

  s = ['manny',
       'mo',
       'jack',
+      'roger',
  ]

This beats the more confusing multi-line diff when the trailing comma was omitted:

  s = ['manny',
       'mo',
-      'jack'
+      'jack',
+      'roger'
  ]

The latter diff makes it harder to see that only one line was added and that the other line didn't change content.

It also reduces the risk of doing this:

s = ['manny',
     'mo',
     'jack'
     'roger'  # Added this line, but forgot to add a comma on the previous line
]

and triggering implicit string literal concatenation, producing s = ['manny', 'mo', 'jackroger'] instead of the intended result.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    This makes the (most) sense, but I would really be surprised if the parser of the language was designed to make diffs easier. – Burhan Khalid Jul 22 '12 at 6:00
  • 95
    @BurhanKhalid: Language designers are programmers, and programmers do many things to make their lives easier. – Greg Hewgill Jul 22 '12 at 6:14
  • 10
    @Burhan If you don't believe that explanation, how about that it's also simpler to define the grammar that way? ;) Compare List = "[" {Item ","} "]". vs. List = "[" ({Item","}Item|)"]". – Voo Jul 22 '12 at 12:41
  • 23
    This also makes it easier for other programs to autogenerate code -- it's much easier to just print "\"item\"," for each item than it is to print "\"item\"" for each item followed by "," for all but the last item. – Adam Rosenfield Mar 26 '13 at 20:05
  • 9
    @Voo I thought the same too but the latter grammar has to be defined anyway because it's still a valid Python list. – Alexander Suraphel Dec 27 '15 at 10:55
35

It's a common syntactical convention to allow trailing commas in an array, languages like C and Java allow it, and Python seems to have adopted this convention for its list data structure. It's particularly useful when generating code for populating a list: just generate a sequence of elements and commas, no need to consider the last one as a special case that shouldn't have a comma at the end.

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30

It helps to eliminate a certain kind of bug. It's sometimes clearer to write lists on multiple lines. But in, later maintenace you may want to rearrange the items.

l1 = [
        1,
        2,
        3,
        4,
        5
]

# Now you want to rearrange

l1 = [
        1,
        2,
        3,
        5
        4,
]

# Now you have an error

But if you allow trailing commas, and use them, you can easily rearrange the lines without introducing an error.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is neat, but you can avoid this by pre-pending the comma. I do that all the time when writing SQL – Burhan Khalid Jul 22 '12 at 5:21
  • 38
    Even if you prepend the comma to each element, you still have to omit the comma on the first one. – Greg Hewgill Jul 22 '12 at 5:25
  • A linter should be able to catch this, no? – viki.omega9 Apr 9 '16 at 19:37
6

A tuple is different because ('a') is expanded using implicit continuation and ()s as a precendence operator, whereas ('a',) refers to a length 1 tuple.

Your original example would have been tuple('a')

| improve this answer | |
  • ('a'), is a string; but my point was that trailing commas in tuples are significant, but in lists they don't appear to be yet Python accepts them. – Burhan Khalid Jul 22 '12 at 5:58
  • 1
    They're silently discarded in both cases, it's just that in a tuple it's needed to differentiate it from a string in bracket. – richo Jul 22 '12 at 17:03
  • tuple('a') is probably a bad example, because in general tuple(x) and (x,) are not the same thing. tuple('ab') != ('ab',). tuple('a') == ('a',) only because 'a' is a string of length 1. – chepner May 31 '18 at 17:19
  • From the REPL: >>> ("a",) == ("a") False >>> ("ab",) == ("ab") False >>> ("ab", "bc",) == ("ab", "bc") True – Seraphya Jan 29 at 22:53
1

The main reason is to make diff less complicated. For example you have a list :

list = [
    'a',
    'b',
    'c'
]

and you want to add another element to it. Then you will be end up doing this:

list = [
    'a',
    'b',
    'c',
    'd'
]

thus, diff will show that two lines have been changed, first adding ',' in line with 'c' and adding 'd' at last line.

So, python allows trailing ',' in last element of list, to prevent extra diff which can cause confusion.

| improve this answer | |

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