6

I have a static class in my Class Library called Lookup, I am using this class to look up different values (in this case Locations).

These values can number into the hundreds. Since 95% of my customers install my app on a machine without Internet access I have to assume that my applications will not have internet access nor access to a database.

So I want to know if this is an efficient way of handling this and if I am properly disposing the object when the method is done:

CODE :

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace FunctionLibrary
{
    public static class Lookups
    {
        private static List<Vers> Versions;

        public static string GetVersion(string s)
        {
            string retValue = string.Empty;
            Versions = new List<Vers>();

            try
            {
                if (s.Trim().Length > 0)
                {

                    GetVersions();
                    retValue = Versions.Find(ver => ver.VersionNumber == s).VersionLiteral;

                    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(retValue))
                    {
                        retValue = string.Format("{0} is an Unknown Version Number", s);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    retValue = "No version number supplied";
                }
            }
            catch
            {
                retValue = string.Format("{0} is an Unknown Version Number", s);
            }
            finally
            {
                Versions.Clear();
                Versions = null;
            }
            return retValue;
        }

        private static void GetVersions()
        {
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0000", VersionLiteral = "Location 1" });
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0001", VersionLiteral = "Location 2" });
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0002", VersionLiteral = "Location 3"});
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0003", VersionLiteral = "Location 4"});
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0004", VersionLiteral = "Location 5"});
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0005", VersionLiteral = "Location 6"});
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0006", VersionLiteral = "Location 7"});
            Versions.Add(new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0007", VersionLiteral = "Location 8"});
        }
    }

    public class Vers
    {

        public string VersionLiteral { get; set; }
        public string VersionNumber { get; set; }
   }
}

I am also wondering if I should use a Dictionary or a Lookup instead of the list. I just don't want multiple calls to this method to cause memory issues.

  • Using generic list<T>, where T is your custom class seems to me just fine - an appropriate way of using. – Mitja Bonca Jul 22 '12 at 6:37
  • This does seem to be a quite inefficient way of handling this. I would definitely use a dictionary and instead of filling the Versions List (dictionary) every time you make a call to GetVersion, only filling it the first time (by checking if the Versions List/Dictionary is null; if it is => fill it, otherwise read from it). As I don't have access to VS right now (and I haven't used C# for a while, so I don' think I can do this without code completion), I can't give you an example; I think it should be fairly easy though... Edit: see eyossi's answer :-) – Joris Jul 22 '12 at 6:40
16

For a more thorough assessment, you might want to consider codereview.SE.


Some general notes on List<T> vs Dictionary<TKey, TValue> vs Lookup<TKey, TElement>

As other answers have shown, using a List is terrible in your scenario, mainly because looking up elements will have bad performance.

Choosing between Dictionary and Lookup isn't hard (from MSDN, emphasis mine):

A Lookup<TKey, TElement> resembles a Dictionary<TKey, TValue>. The difference is
that a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> maps keys to single values, whereas a Lookup<TKey, TElement> maps keys to collections of values.

You can create an instance of a Lookup<TKey, TElement> by calling ToLookup on an object that implements IEnumerable<T>.

Since you will only need to map keys to single values, a Dictionary is the right choice.


The previously accepted answer is a step in the right direction but still gets several key things wrong (edit: these problems have since been resolved).

Strings are immutable: s.Trim() will not change s — it will return a new string meaning you need to s = s.Trim() if you are using to s afterwards, which you are.

A static class can't have an instance constructor: public Lookups() should be static Lookups() (static constructors are not allowed to have access modifiers — of course).

Don't return an empty string / an error message as a string!

That's going to end up as a wonderful debugging headache. You should be using Exceptions instead of passing error strings around — and you should provide a VersionExists method to check if your dictionary contains a certain version!

Modified, safer example

This will throw a FormatException if the parameter is empty, null or whitespace. In the event that the version doesn't exist, the Dictionary will throw a KeyNotFoundException — a bit more helpful for debugging than string.Empty, don't you think?

public static class Lookups
{
    private static Dictionary<string, Vers> Versions;

    static Lookups()
    {
        Versions = new Dictionary<string, Vers>
        {
            {"0000", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0000", VersionLiteral = "Location 1"}},
            {"0001", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0001", VersionLiteral = "Location 2"}},
            {"0002", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0002", VersionLiteral = "Location 3"}},
            {"0003", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0003", VersionLiteral = "Location 4"}},
            {"0004", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0004", VersionLiteral = "Location 5"}},
            {"0005", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0005", VersionLiteral = "Location 6"}},
            {"0006", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0006", VersionLiteral = "Location 7"}},
            {"0007", new Vers {VersionNumber = "0007", VersionLiteral = "Location 8"}}
        };
    }

    public static bool VersionExists(string versionNumber)
    {
        return Versions.ContainsKey(versionNumber);
    }

    public static string GetVersion(string s)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(s)) 
            throw new FormatException("Empty version number!");
        return Versions[s.Trim()].VersionLiteral;
    }
}
3

try that:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace FunctionLibrary
{
public static class Lookups
{
    private static Dictionary<string, Vers> Versions = new Dictionary<string, Vers>();

    static Lookups() //Static constructor
    {
        CreateVesions();
    }

    public static string GetVersion(string s)
    {
        string retValue = string.Empty;

                    s = s.Trim();

        if (s.Length > 0 && Versions.ContainsKey(s))
        {
            retValue = Versions[s].VersionLiteral;
        }

        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(retValue))
        {
            retValue = string.Format("{0} is an Unknown Version Number", s);
        }

        return retValue;
    }

    private static void CreateVesions()
    {
        Versions["0000"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0000", VersionLiteral = "Location 1" };
        Versions["0001"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0001", VersionLiteral = "Location 2" };
        Versions["0002"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0002", VersionLiteral = "Location 3" };
        Versions["0003"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0003", VersionLiteral = "Location 4" };
        Versions["0004"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0004", VersionLiteral = "Location 5" };
        Versions["0005"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0005", VersionLiteral = "Location 6" };
        Versions["0006"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0006", VersionLiteral = "Location 7" };
        Versions["0007"] = new Vers() { VersionNumber = "0007", VersionLiteral = "Location 8" };
    }
}

public class Vers
{

    public string VersionLiteral { get; set; }
    public string VersionNumber { get; set; }
}

}

By that you get:

  1. You initialize the values only once
  2. Better performance looking for a version using a Dictionary
  3. Less code in GetVersion method
  • this will not compile... explanation. – Adam Jul 22 '12 at 7:41
  • @codesparkle You are right... i didn't notice the public keyword instead of static keyword on the constructor, and the trim issue... updated. – eyossi Jul 22 '12 at 7:51
2

Using List in this situation leads to HUGE inefficiency. Your application will be ridiculously slow in this case.

Lookup of Dictionary will help A LOT.

The difference between them is that Lookup allows you to have more than one value for a given key when Dictionary accepts only one.

So if in your case VersionNumber is unique then use Dictionary otherwise use Lookup.

You can simply transform your list into Dictionary or Lookup once:

var versionsDictionary = versionsList
                             .ToDictionary(x => x.VersionNumber);

So you do it once (perhaps when your app is loading) and then use it everywhere:

var myVersion = versionsDictionary[givenNumber];
Console.WriteLine(myVersion.VersionLiteral);

Again, if you need Lookup then replace ToDictionary with ToLookup ;)

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