325

I use hover, active and disabled to style Buttons.

But the problem is when the button is disabled the hover and active styles still applies.

How to apply hover and active only on enabled buttons?

11 Answers 11

541

You can use :enabled pseudo-class, but notice IE<9 does not support it:

button:hover:enabled{
    /*your styles*/
}
button:active:enabled{
    /*your styles*/
}
3
  • 5
    There's also the :not() selector, but then again, it's only supported since IE9 as well. See: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/:not
    – jnns
    Nov 28, 2013 at 16:26
  • 1
    button:hover:enabled didn't seem to work in my case. Using IE9 emulation under IE11. Mar 3, 2017 at 18:38
  • 2
    @jnns thanks. Using this worked for me: button:hover:not([disabled])
    – Kflexior
    Jan 22, 2021 at 9:53
134
.button:active:hover:not([disabled]) {
    /*your styles*/
}

You can try this..

4
  • 2
    This is a good solution for when you want the "hover disabled" state to look identical to the "non-hovered disabled" state. Jul 13, 2016 at 20:02
  • I <3 this solution. allows me to have the following: <button class="button">hovers</button> and <button class="button no-hover>doesn't hover</button> by just using :not(.no-hover)
    – Ben
    Dec 15, 2017 at 17:36
  • life saver for folks who using scss .button { font-weight: 600 !important; width: 186px; height:46px; font-size: 16px !important; line-height: 144% !important; letter-spacing: -0.02em !important; opacity: 1; &:disabled, &.disabled{ color:#fff; border-color: #a0a0a0; background-color: #a0a0a0; } &:disabled:hover, &:disabled:focus, &.disabled:hover, &.disabled:focus { color:#fff; border-color: #a0a0a0; background-color: #a0a0a0; } &:hover:not([disabled]) { opacity: v.$hoverOpacity; } }
    – sylvain s
    Dec 16, 2021 at 16:50
  • You can xplain active?
    – Codelaby
    Jan 9, 2023 at 11:26
46

Why not using attribute "disabled" in css. This must works on all browsers.

button[disabled]:hover {
    background: red;
}
button:hover {
    background: lime;
}
1
  • 19
    Cover all the disabled states by selecting them all in one line: .button[disabled], .button[disabled]:hover, .button[disabled]:focus, .button[disabled]:active {}
    – DBK
    Jun 9, 2014 at 19:35
32

If you are using LESS or Sass, You can try this:

.btn {
  &[disabled] {
    opacity: 0.6;
  }
  &:hover, &:active {
    &:not([disabled]) {
      background-color: darken($orange, 15);
    }
  }
}
1
  • 2
    This is a good solution in SASS since the hover effect will get processed for a disabled button unless you wrap it in not block.
    – mbokil
    Jan 27, 2020 at 15:26
25

Use the lightest touch: overriding via rule order.

.btn {
  /* base styles */
}

.btn:hover {
  color: red;
}

.btn:active {
  color: green;
}

.btn:disabled {
  color: #aaa;
}

The trick is the order -- apply all the non-disabled states first, makes sure they all have the same specificity, and do disabled last, with the same specificity.

This won't work for a "disabled" class added to links, or non-interactive elements, which don't have the disabled property.

(Edited to remove higher-specificity rules, and messing with pointer-events)

18

In sass (scss):

 button {
  color: white;
  cursor: pointer;
  border-radius: 4px;

  &:disabled{
    opacity: 0.4;

    &:hover{
      opacity: 0.4;  //this is what you want
    }
  }

  &:hover{
    opacity: 0.9;
  }
}
4

I was too searching for it when I got one of the simplest methods.

For Pure CSS:

.button {
  background-color: #222222;
  color: #ffffff;
}

.button:hover {
  background-color: #111111;
}

.button:active {
  background-color: #000000;
}

.button:disabled {
  opacity: 0.5;
}

.button:disabled:hover {
  /*To see no effect except the disabled ones, resets the effects of hover to default of button*/
  background-color: #222222;
  color: #ffffff;
}

For SCSS:

.button{
  background-color: #222222;
  color: ffffff;
  &:hover{
    background: #111111;
  }
  &:active{
    background: #000000;
  }
  &:disabled{
    opacity: 0.5;
    &:hover{
      /*To see no effect except the disabled ones, resets the effects of hover to default of button*/
      background-color: #222222;
      color: #ffffff;
    }
  }
}
3

One way is to add a partcular class while disabling buttons and overriding the hover and active states for that class in css. Or removing a class when disabling and specifying the hover and active pseudo properties on that class only in css. Either way, it likely cannot be done purely with css, you'll need to use a bit of js.

0
1

Options:

  1. Add a selector for enabled state.
button:enabled {
}

This requires the element actually have an enabled state. (Buttons do, a div would not.)

  1. Negate a selector for disabled state.
button:not(:disabled) {
}
  1. Disable point events.
button:disabled {
  pointer-events: none;
}

I like this last approach as it can be applied to many styles, and I have never found it to be a problem.

1
/* Styles for the disabled state */
.customButton:disabled,
.customButton[disabled] {
  border: 1px solid #999999;
  background-color: #cccccc;
  color: #666666;
  cursor: not-allowed; /* Optional: Show a "not-allowed" cursor for better visual feedback */
}

.customButton:disabled:hover,
.customButton[disabled]:hover {
  /* You can optionally add different styles for the disabled button when hovered */
}
0

I use the one below in my project.

.bg-brand-3 {
  background-color: black;
  &[type="button"]:enabled {
    &:hover {
      background-color: orange;
    }
    &:active {
      background-color: green;
    }
  }
  &[type="submit"] {
    // css
  }
}

The :enable has the same meaning as :not(:disabled)

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