12

I managed to configure Sublime Text 2 for C++ and I can now compile my code (using the MinGW compiler).

Unfortunately, the Sublime Text console can't support any kind of input for C++.

I want to open my compiled program in an external console (Window's terminal for instance). I tried to use "call" or "cmd" but couldn't make it work. (it still opens the file in the console)

Here's my build configuration:

{
"cmd": ["C:\\MinGW\\bin\\mingw32-g++.exe", "-Wall", "-time", "$file", "-o", "$file_base_name"],
"cmd": ["call", "$file"],
"file_regex": "^[ ]*File \"(...*?)\", line ([0-9]*)",
"working_dir": "${project_path:${folder}}",
"selector": "source.c",
"shell": true,
"encoding": "latin1"
}
2
  • Could you try setting shell to false.
    – nullpotent
    Jul 22, 2012 at 15:21
  • It doesn't work when I put shell to false (even the compiler doesn't work when I do that)
    – halflings
    Jul 22, 2012 at 15:38

6 Answers 6

16

Try with this:

{
    "cmd": ["C:\\Dev-Cpp\\bin\\mingw32-g++.exe", "-static", "-Wall", "-time", "$file", "-o", "$file_base_name.exe", "&&", "start", "$file_base_name"],
    "file_regex": "^[ ]*File \"(...*?)\", line ([0-9]*)",
    "working_dir": "${project_path:${folder}}",
    "selector": "source.c",
    "shell": true,
    "encoding": "latin1"
}

The trick is to execute the generated file using the "start" command, which forces the file to open in a new cmd window, and to put everything inside the first cmd definition (using the && in order to execute the two commands), because if you define more than one cmd array, they overwrite.

4
  • 1
    This works perfectly. Thank you for the great explanation too, didn't know about the "start" command (and I might often use it in the future) !
    – halflings
    Aug 26, 2012 at 15:03
  • 1
    @FacundoJ, How would I do that in Mac or Linux?
    – Tareq
    Aug 31, 2013 at 15:05
  • @Tareq see RichS's answer below :D
    – FacundoJ
    Jan 5, 2014 at 18:51
  • This works great but this doesn't work when I take inputs from a file and output to it another file " freopen("input.txt","r",stdin); freopen("output.txt","w",stdout);" Aug 16, 2019 at 8:01
12

@FacundoJ: On Mac, you can use Terminal to run the app externally. In C++.sublime-build, change the cmd so that instead of just running the compiled output, it launches it in Terminal.

Change from:

"cmd": ["bash", "-c", "g++ '${file}' -o '${file_path}/${file_base_name}' && '${file_path}/${file_base_name}'"]

To:

"cmd": ["bash", "-c", "g++ '${file}' -o '${file_path}/${file_base_name}' && open -a Terminal.app '${file_path}/${file_base_name}'"]
2
  • Is it the same for linux? Jan 31, 2015 at 10:58
  • No, it won't work for Linux as Terminal is a Mac app. But, I'm sure there is an equivalent mechanism.
    – RichS
    Mar 1, 2015 at 20:32
4

The accepted answer allows you to execute the program in Windows CMD and accept input. But once the program execution is over, the cmd window will be closed immediately before you can see clearly the output.

I think you should try the following solution, which keeps the CMD window open after executing the program, so that you can examine your result.

{
    "shell_cmd": "g++ -Wall -std=c++11 \"${file}\" -o \"${file_path}/${file_base_name}.exe\"",
    "file_regex": "^(..[^:]*):([0-9]+):?([0-9]+)?:? (.*)$",
    "working_dir": "${file_path}",
    "selector": "source.c, source.c++",

    "variants":
    [   // run in the sublime text console
        {
            "name": "Run",
            "shell_cmd":"\"${file_path}/${file_base_name}\""
        },
        // run in the Windows cmd
        {
            "name": "Run in cmd",
             // the following two settings are all valid, choose one you prefer
            "shell_cmd":   "start cmd /k  $file_base_name "
            // "shell_cmd":   "start \"$file_base_name\" call $file_base_name"
        }
    ]
}

First press Ctrl+B to compile the program, then press Ctrl+Shift+B and choose run in cmd option, which will run the program in system CMD instead of the Sublime Text console.

The above settings are tested on Windows 8.1, and should also work on Windows 7 and Windows 10 out of the box.

2

In the accepted answer from @FacundoJ you compile the program everytime you run it. This is not always necessary (i.e. when you just modify some external resources or play with main args). In that case I recommend this settings:

{
  "cmd": ["g++", "$file", "-o", "$file_base_name.exe"],
  "working_dir": "${project_path:$folder}",
  "selector": "source.cpp",
  "shell": true,
  "variants": [{
    "name": "Run",
    "cmd": ["start", "", "$file_base_name"]
  }]
}

(Assuming you have C:\MinGW\bin in your PATH) so you can use it like

  • Ctrl+B Compile the program

  • Ctrl+Shift+B Run it (after compiled, of course)

Note1 Note the empty string after start command: it should be used.

Note2 you should use .cpp suffix, or C89 syntax is used by default (at least with MinGW g++ compiler)

1

For ubuntu

{
"cmd": ["g++ ${file} && xterm -hold -e ./a.out"], 
"file_regex": "^(..[^:]*):([0-9]+):?([0-9]+)?:? (.*)$",
"working_dir": "${file_path}",
"selector": "source.c++",
"shell": true,
}

what this build-system does is compiles the .cpp file and open the output file in xterm.

-->if you want the output to open in gnome-terminal,create a profile

In gnome-terminal, go to Edit -> Profile Preferences->Click the Command tab. Select 'Hold the terminal open' from the drop-down menu labelled When command exits.You should create a new profile for that

and then replace "cmd" with

 "cmd": ["g++ ${file} && gnome-terminal --window-with-profile=PROFILENAME -e ./a.out"]
0

This is WORKING !!

{"cmd": ["g++", "-Wall", "-ansi", "-pedantic-errors", "$file_name", "-o", 
"${file_base_name}.exe", "&&", "start", "cmd", "/k" , "$file_base_name"],
"selector": "source.cpp",
"working_dir": "${file_path}",
"shell": true}
  • Just goto Tools>Build Sytem>New build System..."C++.sublime-build"...and Must SAVE it as ALL FILES
  • Select that build

Just enter (ctrl+b) to see an elevated command prompt open and give your inputs like other IDE's.

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