880

I have a big object I want to convert to JSON and send. However it has circular structure, so if I try to use JSON.stringify() I'll get:

TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON

or

TypeError: cyclic object value

I want to toss whatever circular references exist and send whatever can be stringified. How do I do that?

Thanks.

var obj = {
  a: "foo",
  b: obj
}

I want to stringify obj into:

{"a":"foo"}
5

31 Answers 31

908

In Node.js, you can use util.inspect(object). It automatically replaces circular links with "[Circular]".


Albeit being built-in (no installation is required), you must import it

import * as util from 'util' // has no default export
import { inspect } from 'util' // or directly
// or 
var util = require('util')

To use it, simply call

console.log(util.inspect(myObject))

Also be aware that you can pass options object to inspect (see link above)

inspect(myObject[, options: {showHidden, depth, colors, showProxy, ...moreOptions}])


Please, read and give kudos to commenters below...

18
  • 160
    util is a built-in module, you do not have to install it.
    – Mitar
    Feb 15, 2014 at 4:55
  • 15
    console.log(util.inspect(obj)) Nov 25, 2014 at 18:42
  • 29
    @Mitar it is built-in, but you still have to load the module var util = require('util');
    – bodecker
    Sep 6, 2015 at 21:26
  • 27
    Don't be a dunce like me, its just obj_str = util.inspect(thing), NOT <s>garbage_str = JSON.stringify(util.inspect(thing))</s> Nov 21, 2016 at 22:25
  • 18
    This is much better than mucking around with checking types. Why can't stringify just work like this? If it knows there's a circular reference, why can't it just be told to ignore it??? Mar 5, 2018 at 14:45
755

Use JSON.stringify with a custom replacer. For example:

// Demo: Circular reference
var circ = {};
circ.circ = circ;

// Note: cache should not be re-used by repeated calls to JSON.stringify.
var cache = [];
JSON.stringify(circ, (key, value) => {
  if (typeof value === 'object' && value !== null) {
    // Duplicate reference found, discard key
    if (cache.includes(value)) return;

    // Store value in our collection
    cache.push(value);
  }
  return value;
});
cache = null; // Enable garbage collection

The replacer in this example is not 100% correct (depending on your definition of "duplicate"). In the following case, a value is discarded:

var a = {b:1}
var o = {};
o.one = a;
o.two = a;
// one and two point to the same object, but two is discarded:
JSON.stringify(o, ...);

But the concept stands: Use a custom replacer, and keep track of the parsed object values.

As a utility function written in es6:

// safely handles circular references
JSON.safeStringify = (obj, indent = 2) => {
  let cache = [];
  const retVal = JSON.stringify(
    obj,
    (key, value) =>
      typeof value === "object" && value !== null
        ? cache.includes(value)
          ? undefined // Duplicate reference found, discard key
          : cache.push(value) && value // Store value in our collection
        : value,
    indent
  );
  cache = null;
  return retVal;
};

// Example:
console.log('options', JSON.safeStringify(options))
28
  • 1
    @CruzDiablo Serializing DOM is usually meaningless. However, if you can think of a meaningful serialization method for your purposes, then you could try to add a custom serialized to DOM objects: Node.prototype.toJSON = function() { return 'whatever you think that is right'; }; (if you want anything more generic/specific, just try anything in the prototype tree: HTMLDivElement implements HTMLElement implements Element implements Node implements EventTarget; note: this may be browser-dependent, the previous tree is true for Chrome)
    – Rob W
    Mar 12, 2014 at 16:57
  • 18
    this is wrong because it will skip the second appearance of objects that are contained twice, even if not in a really cyclic structure. var a={id:1}; JSON.stringify([a,a]); Jul 1, 2014 at 11:51
  • 4
    @user2451227 "The replacer in this example is not 100% correct (depending on your definition of "duplicate"). But the concept stands: Use a custom replacer, and keep track of the parsed object values."
    – Rob W
    Jul 1, 2014 at 16:52
  • 5
    The GC concern here is arguably redundant. If this is run as a single script then script immediately terminates. If this is encapsulated inside a function for implementation then cache will be unreachable developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/…
    – Trindaz
    Nov 18, 2014 at 16:14
  • 2
    @ruffin: Since making that comment, I've taken the JSON Stringify Safe lib from Isaac and rewrote it: github.com/isaacs/json-stringify-safe. I'm not sure what the supposedly live-fire robust Crockford code does. It looks overly complicated and seems to do the same poor linear check that I warned against above. Aug 28, 2015 at 7:10
277

I wonder why nobody posted the proper solution from MDN page yet...

const circularReference = {otherData: 123};
circularReference.myself = circularReference;

const getCircularReplacer = () => {
  const seen = new WeakSet();
  return (key, value) => {
    if (typeof value === "object" && value !== null) {
      if (seen.has(value)) {
        return;
      }
      seen.add(value);
    }
    return value;
  };
};

const stringified = JSON.stringify(circularReference, getCircularReplacer());

console.log(stringified);

Seen values should be stored in a set, not in array (replacer gets called on every element). Using an array would result in quadratic O((N^2 + N)/2) complexity instead of linear O(N)!

Note, like in the accepted answer, this solution removes all repeating values, not just the circular ones.

8
  • 1
    Neat, but this is ES2015 only. No IE support. Apr 9, 2019 at 1:27
  • 111
    Yoda says: "If still supporting IE one is, then use a transpiler one should." Apr 24, 2019 at 15:55
  • 3
    replacer = () => { const seen = new WeakSet(); return (key, value) => { if (typeof value === "object" && value !== null) { if (seen.has(value)) { return; } seen.add(value); } return value; }; } () => { const seen = new WeakSet(); return (key, value) => { if (typeof value === "object" && value !== null) { if (seen.has(value)) { return; } seen.add(value); … JSON.stringify({a:1, b: '2'}, replacer) returns undefined in chrome Jul 10, 2019 at 15:08
  • 3
    This answer (like the accepted answer) has a bug (that is commented here by user2451227), when o = {}; JSON.stringify([o, o], getCircularReplacer()). Apr 23, 2022 at 14:10
  • 2
    This detects duplicate objects in the structure, not circular. While a circular will contain a duplicate reference, not all duplicates are circular objects. So, this removes non-circular references too. For example with this, const a = {greeting: "hi"}; const obj = {first: a, second: a};, using circular() when stringifying obj will remove the second property, even though it is NOT circular at all. So, it removes unnecessary things.
    – jfriend00
    Feb 12, 2023 at 5:39
86

just do

npm i --save circular-json

then in your js file

const CircularJSON = require('circular-json');
...
const json = CircularJSON.stringify(obj);

https://github.com/WebReflection/circular-json

NOTE: I have nothing to do with this package. But I do use it for this.

Update 2020

Please note CircularJSON is in maintenance only and flatted is its successor.

6
  • Thanks a lot! Great library, saved tons of time. Super tiny (just 1.4KB minified). Aug 5, 2017 at 17:47
  • 18
    I think you might require some more justification for using a module than "just do". And it's not great to overwrite JSON on principle.
    – Edwin
    Mar 21, 2018 at 17:17
  • I needed to copy an object to use for stub testing. This answer was perfect. I copied the object and then removed the override. Thanks!! Nov 6, 2018 at 16:14
  • 1
    According to the author, this package has been deprecated. CircularJSON is in maintenance only, flatted is its successor. Link: github.com/WebReflection/flatted#flatted
    – rmolinamir
    Jan 14, 2019 at 18:46
  • 11
    Beware, the 'flatted' (and circular-json?) package doesn't replicate JSON.stringify() functionality. It creates its own non-JSON format. (e.g., Flatted.stringify({blah: 1}) results in [{"blah":1}]) I see someone tried to raise an issue about this, and the author berated them and locked the issue to comments.
    – jameslol
    Apr 9, 2019 at 6:25
49

I really liked Trindaz's solution - more verbose, however it had some bugs. I fixed them for whoever likes it too.

Plus, I added a length limit on my cache objects.

If the object I am printing is really big - I mean infinitely big - I want to limit my algorithm.

JSON.stringifyOnce = function(obj, replacer, indent){
    var printedObjects = [];
    var printedObjectKeys = [];

    function printOnceReplacer(key, value){
        if ( printedObjects.length > 2000){ // browsers will not print more than 20K, I don't see the point to allow 2K.. algorithm will not be fast anyway if we have too many objects
        return 'object too long';
        }
        var printedObjIndex = false;
        printedObjects.forEach(function(obj, index){
            if(obj===value){
                printedObjIndex = index;
            }
        });

        if ( key == ''){ //root element
             printedObjects.push(obj);
            printedObjectKeys.push("root");
             return value;
        }

        else if(printedObjIndex+"" != "false" && typeof(value)=="object"){
            if ( printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] == "root"){
                return "(pointer to root)";
            }else{
                return "(see " + ((!!value && !!value.constructor) ? value.constructor.name.toLowerCase()  : typeof(value)) + " with key " + printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] + ")";
            }
        }else{

            var qualifiedKey = key || "(empty key)";
            printedObjects.push(value);
            printedObjectKeys.push(qualifiedKey);
            if(replacer){
                return replacer(key, value);
            }else{
                return value;
            }
        }
    }
    return JSON.stringify(obj, printOnceReplacer, indent);
};
3
  • You're missing a null check on this line : return "(see " + (!!value.constructor ? value.constructor.name.toLowerCase() : typeof(value)) + " with key " + printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] + ")";
    – Isak
    Aug 24, 2013 at 17:13
  • I will gladly add it. just let me know what is nullable as I did experience any problems so far. Sep 2, 2013 at 9:05
  • 2
    // browsers will not print more than 20K - But you put limit as 2k. Perhaps change for the future?
    – Pochen
    May 2, 2016 at 13:58
48

Note that there is also a JSON.decycle method implemented by Douglas Crockford. See his cycle.js. This allows you to stringify almost any standard structure:

var a = [];
a[0] = a;
a[1] = 123;
console.log(JSON.stringify(JSON.decycle(a)));
// result: '[{"$ref":"$"},123]'.

You can also recreate original object with retrocycle method. So you don't have to remove cycles from objects to stringify them.

However this will not work for DOM Nodes (which are typical cause of cycles in real life use-cases). For example this will throw:

var a = [document.body];
console.log(JSON.stringify(JSON.decycle(a)));

I've made a fork to solve that problem (see my cycle.js fork). This should work fine:

var a = [document.body];
console.log(JSON.stringify(JSON.decycle(a, true)));

Note that in my fork JSON.decycle(variable) works as in the original and will throw an exception when the variable contain DOM nodes/elements.

When you use JSON.decycle(variable, true) you accept the fact that the result will not be reversible (retrocycle will not re-create DOM nodes). DOM elements should be identifiable to some extent though. For example if a div element has an id then it will be replaced with a string "div#id-of-the-element".

6
  • 2
    Both his code and yours give me a "RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded" when I use them.
    – jcollum
    Apr 29, 2014 at 18:17
  • I can have a look if you provide your code on the Fiddle or add an issue on Github: github.com/Eccenux/JSON-js/issues
    – Nux
    Apr 30, 2014 at 16:12
  • This is what I was looking for. JSON.decycle(a, true) what happens when you pass true as a parameter to decycle function.
    – Rudra
    Dec 22, 2015 at 13:20
  • @Rudra true makes stringifyNodes option true in the fork. This will dump e.g. div with id="some-id" to string: div#some-id. You will avoid some problems, but you won't to be able to fully retro-cycle.
    – Nux
    Dec 24, 2015 at 1:25
  • There is npm package npmjs.com/package/json-js, but it wasn't updated for a while Oct 18, 2019 at 1:34
42

@RobW's answer is correct, but this is more performant ! Because it uses a hashmap/set:

const customStringify = function (v) {
  const cache = new Set();
  return JSON.stringify(v, function (key, value) {
    if (typeof value === 'object' && value !== null) {
      if (cache.has(value)) {
        // Circular reference found
        try {
          // If this value does not reference a parent it can be deduped
         return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(value));
        }
        catch (err) {
          // discard key if value cannot be deduped
         return;
        }
      }
      // Store value in our set
      cache.add(value);
    }
    return value;
  });
};
5
  • For deeply nested objects with circular references, try stringifyDeep => github.com/ORESoftware/safe-stringify Dec 8, 2018 at 23:12
  • It's possibly that the Set implementation just uses an array and indexOf under the hood, but I haven't confirmed that. Dec 8, 2018 at 23:13
  • This is removing parent nodes having child nodes even with different values - eg - {"a":{"b":{"a":"d"}}} and even removing nodes having empty object {} Jan 17, 2019 at 16:03
  • Can you show an example of that Sandip? create a gist.github.com or whatnot Jan 17, 2019 at 23:25
  • 1
    Excellent !!! First (from top, but checked 2-3 function solutions only) working solution here under node.js and Fission ;-) - libraries hanged-up.
    – Jan
    Jul 12, 2019 at 9:51
26

I'd recommend checking out json-stringify-safe from @isaacs-- it's used in NPM.

BTW- if you're not using Node.js, you can just copy and paste lines 4-27 from the relevant part of the source code.

To install:

$ npm install json-stringify-safe --save

To use:

// Require the thing
var stringify = require('json-stringify-safe');

// Take some nasty circular object
var theBigNasty = {
  a: "foo",
  b: theBigNasty
};

// Then clean it up a little bit
var sanitized = JSON.parse(stringify(theBigNasty));

This yields:

{
  a: 'foo',
  b: '[Circular]'
}

Note that, just like with the vanilla JSON.stringify function as @Rob W mentioned, you can also customize the sanitization behavior by passing in a "replacer" function as the second argument to stringify(). If you find yourself needing a simple example of how to do this, I just wrote a custom replacer which coerces errors, regexps, and functions into human-readable strings here.

1
  • I like this solution because it solves the problem with fewer limitations than others. It avoids: 1) only working on NodeJS, 2) removing duplicates not just cycles, 3) outputting JSON with non-standard overall structure. It's also packaged nicely on npm, but with nice and short source code (allowing simple copy-paste).
    – Venryx
    Sep 18, 2020 at 7:57
14

For future googlers searching for a solution to this problem when you don't know the keys of all circular references, you could use a wrapper around the JSON.stringify function to rule out circular references. See an example script at https://gist.github.com/4653128.

The solution essentially boils down to keeping a reference to previously printed objects in an array, and checking that in a replacer function before returning a value. It's more constrictive than only ruling out circular references, because it also rules out ever printing an object twice, one of the side affects of which is to avoid circular references.

Example wrapper:

function stringifyOnce(obj, replacer, indent){
    var printedObjects = [];
    var printedObjectKeys = [];

    function printOnceReplacer(key, value){
        var printedObjIndex = false;
        printedObjects.forEach(function(obj, index){
            if(obj===value){
                printedObjIndex = index;
            }
        });

        if(printedObjIndex && typeof(value)=="object"){
            return "(see " + value.constructor.name.toLowerCase() + " with key " + printedObjectKeys[printedObjIndex] + ")";
        }else{
            var qualifiedKey = key || "(empty key)";
            printedObjects.push(value);
            printedObjectKeys.push(qualifiedKey);
            if(replacer){
                return replacer(key, value);
            }else{
                return value;
            }
        }
    }
    return JSON.stringify(obj, printOnceReplacer, indent);
}
3
  • 3
    Nice code. You have a silly error though, you write if(printedObjIndex) while you should write if(printedObjIndex==false) because index can also be 0 which is translated to false unless you explicitly state otherwise. Jul 21, 2013 at 13:14
  • 1
    @guymograbi Don't you mean ===? 0 == false is true, 0 === false is false. ;^) But I'd rather not initialize printedObjIndex to false, as then you can check against undefined so that you're (well, Trindaz's) not mixing metaphors as strangely.
    – ruffin
    Aug 27, 2015 at 18:33
  • @ruffin nice catch. yes obviously, always use hard equality and jshint to catch such silly mistakes. Aug 28, 2015 at 12:32
5
var a={b:"b"};
a.a=a;
JSON.stringify(preventCircularJson(a));

evaluates to:

"{"b":"b","a":"CIRCULAR_REFERENCE_REMOVED"}"

with the function:

/**
 * Traverses a javascript object, and deletes all circular values
 * @param source object to remove circular references from
 * @param censoredMessage optional: what to put instead of censored values
 * @param censorTheseItems should be kept null, used in recursion
 * @returns {undefined}
 */
function preventCircularJson(source, censoredMessage, censorTheseItems) {
    //init recursive value if this is the first call
    censorTheseItems = censorTheseItems || [source];
    //default if none is specified
    censoredMessage = censoredMessage || "CIRCULAR_REFERENCE_REMOVED";
    //values that have allready apeared will be placed here:
    var recursiveItems = {};
    //initaite a censored clone to return back
    var ret = {};
    //traverse the object:
    for (var key in source) {
        var value = source[key]
        if (typeof value == "object") {
            //re-examine all complex children again later:
            recursiveItems[key] = value;
        } else {
            //simple values copied as is
            ret[key] = value;
        }
    }
    //create list of values to censor:
    var censorChildItems = [];
    for (var key in recursiveItems) {
        var value = source[key];
        //all complex child objects should not apear again in children:
        censorChildItems.push(value);
    }
    //censor all circular values
    for (var key in recursiveItems) {
        var value = source[key];
        var censored = false;
        censorTheseItems.forEach(function (item) {
            if (item === value) {
                censored = true;
            }
        });
        if (censored) {
            //change circular values to this
            value = censoredMessage;
        } else {
            //recursion:
            value = preventCircularJson(value, censoredMessage, censorChildItems.concat(censorTheseItems));
        }
        ret[key] = value

    }

    return ret;
}
1
  • Works, but is substantially more verbose than it could be.
    – Venryx
    Sep 18, 2020 at 7:58
4

Use the JSON.stringify method with a replacer. Read this documentation for more information. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc836459%28v=vs.94%29.aspx

var obj = {
  a: "foo",
  b: obj
}

var replacement = {"b":undefined};

alert(JSON.stringify(obj,replacement));

Figure out a way to populate the replacement array with cyclic references. You can use the typeof method to find if an the property is of type 'object' ( reference ) and an exact equality check ( === ) to verify circular reference.

2
  • 4
    This might only work in IE (considering the fact that MSDN is documentation from Microsoft, and Microsoft creates IE). In Firefox/Chrome, jsfiddle.net/ppmaW generates the circular reference error. FYI: var obj = {foo:obj} does not create a circular reference. Instead, it creates an object whose foo attribute refers to the previous value of obj (undefined if not previously defined, declared because of var obj).
    – Rob W
    Jul 23, 2012 at 18:10
  • Yes, this doesn't work in Chrome. It simply outputs "b", rather than any of the other values in "obj". Dec 1, 2020 at 9:48
4

If

console.log(JSON.stringify(object));

results in a

TypeError: cyclic object value

Then you may want to print like this:

var output = '';
for (property in object) {
  output += property + ': ' + object[property]+'; ';
}
console.log(output);
2
  • 24
    Maybe because it only prints one level? Dec 19, 2013 at 23:52
  • VERY SIMPLE i upvoted this because it worked for me right out of the box in chrome. EXCELLENT Sep 28, 2018 at 19:40
4

I know this is an old question, but I'd like to suggest an NPM package I've created called smart-circular, which works differently from the other ways proposed. It's specially useful if you're using big and deep objects.

Some features are:

  • Replacing circular references or simply repeated structures inside the object by the path leading to its first occurrence (not just the string [circular]);

  • By looking for circularities in a breadth-first search, the package ensures this path is as small as possible, which is important when dealing with very big and deep objects, where the paths can get annoyingly long and difficult to follow (the custom replacement in JSON.stringify does a DFS);

  • Allows personalised replacements, handy to simplify or ignore less important parts of the object;

  • Finally, the paths are written exactly in the way necessary to access the field referenced, which can help you debugging.

1
  • This is nice, although it's removing duplicates as well, not just circular links. (well, if you define "circular" as meaning that doing a depth-first recursion, without safeguards, would result in a call-stack going over the same entry multiple/infinite times) Has a use, but not what some would define as "circular" (ie. causing infinite recursion).
    – Venryx
    Sep 18, 2020 at 8:02
4

This solution fixes the issue reported by user2451227 on accepted answer (when o = {}; JSON.stringify([o, o], getCircularReplacer())).

function newCircularReplacer () {
  const seenValues = []
  return circularReplacer

  function circularReplacer (key, value) {
    if (typeof value === 'object' && value !== null && Object.keys(value).length) {
      const stackSize = seenValues.length
      if (stackSize) {
        for (let n = stackSize - 1; seenValues[n][key] !== value; --n) seenValues.pop() // Clean up expired references
        if (seenValues.includes(value)) return '[Circular]'
      }
      seenValues.push(value)
    }
    return value
  }
}

let o = {a: 1}
o.b = o // Circular reference
console.log(
  JSON.stringify(o, newCircularReplacer()) // {a:1,b:[Circular]} ✅
)

o = {}
const notCircularReference = [o, o]
console.log(
  JSON.stringify(notCircularReference, newCircularReplacer()) // [{},{}] ✅ (NOT circular reference)
)

2
  • 1
    How does answering a question with a link to the accepted answer of the same question help?
    – Adam Yost
    Jan 16, 2023 at 18:50
  • 2
    @AdamYost; The mentioned answer had an issue. This answer resolves it. Jan 17, 2023 at 21:37
3

The second argument to JSON.stringify() also allows you to specify an array of key names that should be preserved from every object it encounters within your data. This may not work for all use cases, but is a much simpler solution.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/JSON/stringify

var obj = {
    a: "foo",
    b: this
}

var json = JSON.stringify(obj, ['a']);
console.log(json);
// {"a":"foo"}

Note: Strangely, the object definition from OP does not throw a circular reference error in the latest Chrome or Firefox. The definition in this answer was modified so that it did throw an error.


0
2

I found circular-json library on github and it worked well for my problem.

Some good features I found useful:

  • Supports multi-platform usage but I only tested it with node.js so far.
  • API is same so all you need to do is include and use it as a JSON replacement.
  • It have it's own parsing method so you can convert the 'circular' serialized data back to object.
4
  • 2
    This library threw an error for me so I have to look for another. ERROR TypeError: toISOString is not a function at String.toJSON (<anonymous>) at Object.<anonymous> (localhost:8100/build/polyfills.js:1:3458) at JSON.stringify (<anonymous>) at Object.stringifyRecursion [as stringify] (localhost:8100/build/main.js:258450:15)
    – Mark Ellul
    Aug 18, 2017 at 9:51
  • 1
    @MarkEllul I've written the comment in 2015 and if I'll see a better alternative I'll post it here with an edit. I still end up the same issue in daily work occasionally and I usually prefer my own manual functions in a recursive manner with a proper/safe inspection. I would suggest checking out functional programming practices if you are unfamiliar, usually, it's easing up this kind of recursive operations as being less tricky and more reliable.
    – JacopKane
    Jun 2, 2019 at 1:36
  • Also getting "toISOString is not a function" trying to stringify an event and re-send it in a cypress test May 1, 2020 at 3:17
  • Yeah, it was working fine back in 2013. Need to update
    – JacopKane
    Jul 1, 2020 at 18:01
2

To update the answer of overriding the way JSON works (probably not recommended, but super simple), don't use circular-json (it's deprecated). Instead, use the successor, flatted:

https://www.npmjs.com/package/flatted

Borrowed from the old answer above from @user1541685 , but replaced with the new one:

npm i --save flatted

then in your js file

const CircularJSON = require('flatted');
const json = CircularJSON.stringify(obj);
2

This code will fail for circular reference:

    JSON.stringify(circularReference);
// TypeError: cyclic object value

Use the below code:

 const getCircularReplacer = () => {
  const seen = new WeakSet();
  return (key, value) => {
    if (typeof value === "object" && value !== null) {
      if (seen.has(value)) {
        return;
      }
      seen.add(value);
    }
    return value;
  };
};

JSON.stringify(circularReference, getCircularReplacer());
1
  • This remove all object used 2 times or more, not only references Nov 30, 2021 at 11:23
1

I resolve this problem like this:

var util = require('util');

// Our circular object
var obj = {foo: {bar: null}, a:{a:{a:{a:{a:{a:{a:{hi: 'Yo!'}}}}}}}};
obj.foo.bar = obj;

// Generate almost valid JS object definition code (typeof string)
var str = util.inspect(b, {depth: null});

// Fix code to the valid state (in this example it is not required, but my object was huge and complex, and I needed this for my case)
str = str
    .replace(/<Buffer[ \w\.]+>/ig, '"buffer"')
    .replace(/\[Function]/ig, 'function(){}')
    .replace(/\[Circular]/ig, '"Circular"')
    .replace(/\{ \[Function: ([\w]+)]/ig, '{ $1: function $1 () {},')
    .replace(/\[Function: ([\w]+)]/ig, 'function $1(){}')
    .replace(/(\w+): ([\w :]+GMT\+[\w \(\)]+),/ig, '$1: new Date("$2"),')
    .replace(/(\S+): ,/ig, '$1: null,');

// Create function to eval stringifyed code
var foo = new Function('return ' + str + ';');

// And have fun
console.log(JSON.stringify(foo(), null, 4));
1
  • This pretty much worked for me but it seems like classes were being represented like _class: ClassName { data: "here" }, so I added the following rule .replace(/(\w+) {/g, '{ __ClassName__: "$1", '). In my case I was trying to see what an http request object looked like.
    – redbmk
    May 7, 2016 at 18:29
1

Although this has been answered sufficiently, you could also explicitly delete the property in question before stringification using the delete operator.

delete obj.b; 
const jsonObject = JSON.stringify(obj);

delete operator

this will remove the need to build or maintain complex logic to remove circular references.

1
function myStringify(obj, maxDeepLevel = 2) {
  if (obj === null) {
    return 'null';
  }
  if (obj === undefined) {
    return 'undefined';
  }
  if (maxDeepLevel < 0 || typeof obj !== 'object') {
    return obj.toString();
  }
  return Object
    .entries(obj)
    .map(x => x[0] + ': ' + myStringify(x[1], maxDeepLevel - 1))
    .join('\r\n');
}
1

Here's a solution that:

  • removes cycles only (and not all duplicate object references, as do most of the solutions posted here so far),
  • is not unnecessarily verbose,
  • is fast,
  • does not require any library dependency.
function replaceCycles(obj, replacement = undefined, seen = new WeakSet()) {
  if (typeof obj === 'object')
    if (seen.has(obj))
      return replacement 
    else {
      seen.add(obj)
      const newObj = {}
      for (const key in obj)
        newObj[key] = replaceCycles(obj[key], replacement, seen)
      seen.delete(obj)
      return newObj
    }
  else
    return obj
}

Usage:

const a = {
  b: 'v1',
  c: {
    d: 'v2'
  }
}

a.e = a.c
a.c.f = a.c

console.log(JSON.stringify(replaceCycles(a, '[CYCLE]')))

Output:

"{'b':'v1','c':{'d':'v2','f':'[CYCLE]'},'e':{'d':'v2','f':'[CYCLE]'}}"
0

an other solution for resolving this issue with these kind of objects is that using this library

https://github.com/ericmuyser/stringy

its simple and you can in a few simple step solve this.

0

Based on the other answers I end up with the following code. It works pretty well with circular references, objects with custom constructors.

From the given object to be serialized,

  • Cache all the object you come across while traversing the object and assign each of them a unique hashID (an auto-incrementing number also works)
  • Once a circular reference is found mark that field in the new object as circular and store the hashID of the original object as an attribute.

Github Link - DecycledJSON

DJSHelper = {};
DJSHelper.Cache = [];
DJSHelper.currentHashID = 0;
DJSHelper.ReviveCache = [];

// DOES NOT SERIALIZE FUNCTION
function DJSNode(name, object, isRoot){
    this.name = name;
    // [ATTRIBUTES] contains the primitive fields of the Node
    this.attributes = {};

    // [CHILDREN] contains the Object/Typed fields of the Node
    // All [CHILDREN] must be of type [DJSNode]
    this.children = []; //Array of DJSNodes only

    // If [IS-ROOT] is true reset the Cache and currentHashId
    // before encoding
    isRoot = typeof isRoot === 'undefined'? true:isRoot;
    this.isRoot = isRoot;
    if(isRoot){
        DJSHelper.Cache = [];
        DJSHelper.currentHashID = 0;

        // CACHE THE ROOT
        object.hashID = DJSHelper.currentHashID++;
        DJSHelper.Cache.push(object);
    }

    for(var a in object){
        if(object.hasOwnProperty(a)){
            var val = object[a];

            if (typeof val === 'object') {
                // IF OBJECT OR NULL REF.

                /***************************************************************************/
                // DO NOT REMOVE THE [FALSE] AS THAT WOULD RESET THE [DJSHELPER.CACHE]
                // AND THE RESULT WOULD BE STACK OVERFLOW
                /***************************************************************************/
                if(val !== null) {
                    if (DJSHelper.Cache.indexOf(val) === -1) {
                        // VAL NOT IN CACHE
                        // ADD THE VAL TO CACHE FIRST -> BEFORE DOING RECURSION
                        val.hashID = DJSHelper.currentHashID++;
                        //console.log("Assigned", val.hashID, "to", a);
                        DJSHelper.Cache.push(val);

                        if (!(val instanceof Array)) {
                            // VAL NOT AN [ARRAY]
                            try {
                                this.children.push(new DJSNode(a, val, false));
                            } catch (err) {
                                console.log(err.message, a);
                                throw err;
                            }
                        } else {
                            // VAL IS AN [ARRAY]
                            var node = new DJSNode(a, {
                                array: true,
                                hashID: val.hashID // HashID of array
                            }, false);
                            val.forEach(function (elem, index) {
                                node.children.push(new DJSNode("elem", {val: elem}, false));
                            });
                            this.children.push(node);
                        }
                    } else {
                        // VAL IN CACHE
                        // ADD A CYCLIC NODE WITH HASH-ID
                        this.children.push(new DJSNode(a, {
                            cyclic: true,
                            hashID: val.hashID
                        }, false));
                    }
                }else{
                    // PUT NULL AS AN ATTRIBUTE
                    this.attributes[a] = 'null';
                }
            } else if (typeof val !== 'function') {
                // MUST BE A PRIMITIVE
                // ADD IT AS AN ATTRIBUTE
                this.attributes[a] = val;
            }
        }
    }

    if(isRoot){
        DJSHelper.Cache = null;
    }
    this.constructorName = object.constructor.name;
}
DJSNode.Revive = function (xmlNode, isRoot) {
    // Default value of [isRoot] is True
    isRoot = typeof isRoot === 'undefined'?true: isRoot;
    var root;
    if(isRoot){
        DJSHelper.ReviveCache = []; //Garbage Collect
    }
    if(window[xmlNode.constructorName].toString().indexOf('[native code]') > -1 ) {
        // yep, native in the browser
        if(xmlNode.constructorName == 'Object'){
            root = {};
        }else{
            return null;
        }
    }else {
        eval('root = new ' + xmlNode.constructorName + "()");
    }

    //CACHE ROOT INTO REVIVE-CACHE
    DJSHelper.ReviveCache[xmlNode.attributes.hashID] = root;

    for(var k in xmlNode.attributes){
        // PRIMITIVE OR NULL REF FIELDS
        if(xmlNode.attributes.hasOwnProperty(k)) {
            var a = xmlNode.attributes[k];
            if(a == 'null'){
                root[k] = null;
            }else {
                root[k] = a;
            }
        }
    }

    xmlNode.children.forEach(function (value) {
        // Each children is an [DJSNode]
        // [Array]s are stored as [DJSNode] with an positive Array attribute
        // So is value

        if(value.attributes.array){
            // ITS AN [ARRAY]
            root[value.name] = [];
            value.children.forEach(function (elem) {
                root[value.name].push(elem.attributes.val);
            });
            //console.log("Caching", value.attributes.hashID);
            DJSHelper.ReviveCache[value.attributes.hashID] = root[value.name];
        }else if(!value.attributes.cyclic){
            // ITS AN [OBJECT]
            root[value.name] = DJSNode.Revive(value, false);
            //console.log("Caching", value.attributes.hashID);
            DJSHelper.ReviveCache[value.attributes.hashID] = root[value.name];
        }
    });

    // [SEPARATE ITERATION] TO MAKE SURE ALL POSSIBLE
    // [CYCLIC] REFERENCES ARE CACHED PROPERLY
    xmlNode.children.forEach(function (value) {
        // Each children is an [DJSNode]
        // [Array]s are stored as [DJSNode] with an positive Array attribute
        // So is value

        if(value.attributes.cyclic){
            // ITS AND [CYCLIC] REFERENCE
            root[value.name] = DJSHelper.ReviveCache[value.attributes.hashID];
        }
    });

    if(isRoot){
        DJSHelper.ReviveCache = null; //Garbage Collect
    }
    return root;
};

DecycledJSON = {};
DecycledJSON.stringify = function (obj) {
    return JSON.stringify(new DJSNode("root", obj));
};
DecycledJSON.parse = function (json, replacerObject) {
    // use the replacerObject to get the null values
    return DJSNode.Revive(JSON.parse(json));
};
DJS = DecycledJSON;

Example Usage 1:

var obj = {
    id:201,
    box: {
        owner: null,
        key: 'storm'
    },
    lines:[
        'item1',
        23
    ]
};

console.log(obj); // ORIGINAL

// SERIALIZE AND THEN PARSE
var jsonObj = DJS.stringify(obj);
console.log(DJS.parse(jsonObj));

Example Usage 2:

// PERSON OBJECT

function Person() {
    this.name = null;
    this.child = null;
    this.dad = null;
    this.mom = null;
}
var Dad = new Person();
Dad.name = 'John';
var Mom = new Person();
Mom.name = 'Sarah';
var Child = new Person();
Child.name = 'Kiddo';

Dad.child = Mom.child = Child;
Child.dad = Dad;
Child.mom = Mom;

console.log(Child); // ORIGINAL

// SERIALIZE AND THEN PARSE
var jsonChild = DJS.stringify(Child);
console.log(DJS.parse(jsonChild));
0

I know this question is old and has lots of great answers but I post this answer because of it's new flavor (es5+)

Object.defineProperties(JSON, {
  refStringify: {
    value: function(obj) {

      let objMap = new Map();
      let stringified = JSON.stringify(obj,
        function(key, value) {

          // only for objects
          if (typeof value == 'object') {
            // If has the value then return a reference to it
            if (objMap.has(value))
              return objMap.get(value);

            objMap.set(value, `ref${objMap.size + 1}`);
          }
          return value;
        });
      return stringified;
    }
  },
  refParse: {
    value: function(str) {

      let parsed = JSON.parse(str);
      let objMap = _createObjectMap(parsed);
      objMap.forEach((value, key) => _replaceKeyWithObject(value, key));
      return parsed;
    }
  },
});

// *************************** Example
let a = {
  b: 32,
  c: {
    get a() {
        return a;
      },
      get c() {
        return a.c;
      }
  }
};
let stringified = JSON.refStringify(a);
let parsed = JSON.refParse(stringified, 2);
console.log(parsed, JSON.refStringify(parsed));
// *************************** /Example

// *************************** Helper
function _createObjectMap(obj) {

  let objMap = new Map();
  JSON.stringify(obj, (key, value) => {
    if (typeof value == 'object') {
      if (objMap.has(value))
        return objMap.get(value);
      objMap.set(value, `ref${objMap.size + 1}`);

    }
    return value;
  });
  return objMap;
}

function _replaceKeyWithObject(key, obj, replaceWithObject = obj) {

  Object.keys(obj).forEach(k => {

    let val = obj[k];
    if (val == key)
      return (obj[k] = replaceWithObject);
    if (typeof val == 'object' && val != replaceWithObject)
      _replaceKeyWithObject(key, val, replaceWithObject);
  });
}

0

Try this:

var obj = {
    a: "foo",
    b: obj
};

var circular_replacer = (value) => {
    var seen = [];
    if (value != null && typeof value == "object") {
        if (seen.indexOf(value) >= 0) return;
        seen.push(value);
    }
    return value;
};

obj = circular_replacer(obj);
2
  • Shouldn't there be, like, few more lines of code after the seen.push(value) =-D? Like for (var key in value) {value[key] = circular_replacer(value[key]);}
    – Klesun
    Dec 11, 2018 at 19:42
  • Code-only answers are discouraged. Please click on edit and add some words summarising how your code addresses the question, or perhaps explain how your answer differs from the previous answer/answers. From Review
    – Nick
    Dec 11, 2018 at 23:31
0

You could try the JSON parser library: treedoc. it supports circular references and also dedupes the repeated objects with references.

yarn add treedoc

import {TD} from 'treedoc'
TD.stringify(obj);

If you want more customization

import {TD, TDEncodeOption} from 'treedoc'

const opt = new TDEncodeOption();
opt.coderOption.setShowType(true).setShowFunction(true);
opt.jsonOption.setIndentFactor(2);
return TD.stringify(obj, opt);

The generated JSON file can be viewed by the viewer http://treedoc.org, which supports the navigation through JSON node references.

[shameless plug] I'm the author of this library

0

Most of the answers in this thread are catered to use with JSON.stringify specifically -- they do not show how to actually remove circular-references in the original object-tree. (well, short of calling JSON.parse again afterward -- which requires reassignment, and has a higher performance impact)

For removing circular-references from the source object-tree, you can use a function such as this: https://stackoverflow.com/a/63952549/2441655

These general-purpose circular-reference-remover functions can then be used to make subsequent calls to circular-reference-sensitive functions (like JSON.stringify) safe:

const objTree = {normalProp: true};
objTree.selfReference = objTree;
RemoveCircularLinks(objTree); // without this line, the JSON.stringify call errors
console.log(JSON.stringify(objTree));
0

I created following method for my LoggingUtilities class. Following method takes source and target objects, and assign source to target by given maxLevel.

  static assignObjectByLevel(
    sourceObject: any,
    targetObject: any,
    currentLevel: number = 0,
    maxLevel: number = 3,
    showUndefinedValues = false
  ): any {
    if (currentLevel >= maxLevel) {
      return;
    }

    const objQueue = [];
    for (const key in sourceObject) {
      if (sourceObject.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
        const value = sourceObject[key];
        if (typeof value === "object") {
          objQueue.push({ key, value });
        } else {
          targetObject[key] = value;
        }
      } else {
        if (showUndefinedValues) {
          targetObject[key] = "undefined/null";
        }
      }
    }

    while (objQueue.length > 0) {
      const objVal = objQueue.pop();
      currentLevel++;
      targetObject[objVal.key] = {};
      this.assignObjectByLevel(
        objVal.value,
        targetObject[objVal.key],
        currentLevel,
        maxLevel,
        false
      );
    }
  }

Usage Example:

   const logObjParam = {
      level1: "value1",
      level2: {
        value2: "value2",
        level3: {
          value3: "value3",
          level4: {
            value4: " value4",
            level5: {
              value5: " value5",
            },
          },
        },
      },
    };

 let logObj = {};
 this.assignObjectByLevel(logObjParam, logObj);

Result:

{
  "level1": "value1",
  "level2": {
    "value2": "value2",
    "level3": {
      "value3": "value3",
      "level4": {}
    }
  }
}
0

superserial fully serializes JavaScript objects.

https://github.com/denostack/superserial

Usage:

const serializer = new Serializer();

const nodes = [{ self: null as any, siblings: [] as any[] }, {
  self: null as any,
  siblings: [] as any[],
}];
nodes[0].self = nodes[0];
nodes[0].siblings = nodes;
nodes[1].self = nodes[1];
nodes[1].siblings = nodes;

const serialized = serializer.serialize(nodes);

console.log(serialized);

output:

[$1,$2];{"self":$1,"siblings":$0};{"self":$2,"siblings":$0}

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