17

I am trying to learn Python programming, and I'm pretty new at this.

I was having issues in printing a series of prime numbers from one to hundred. I can't figure our what's wrong with my code.

Here's what I wrote; it prints all the odd numbers instead of primes:

for num in range(1,101):
    for i in range(2,num):
        if (num%i==0):
            break
        else:
            print(num)
            break

31 Answers 31

43

You need to check all numbers from 2 to n-1 (to sqrt(n) actually, but ok, let it be n). If n is divisible by any of the numbers, it is not prime. If a number is prime, print it.

for num in range(2,101):
    prime = True
    for i in range(2,num):
        if (num%i==0):
            prime = False
    if prime:
       print num

You can write the same much shorter and more pythonic:

for num in range(2,101):
    if all(num%i!=0 for i in range(2,num)):
       print num

As I've said already, it would be better to check divisors not from 2 to n-1, but from 2 to sqrt(n):

import math
for num in range(2,101):
    if all(num%i!=0 for i in range(2,int(math.sqrt(num))+1)):
       print num

For small numbers like 101 it doesn't matter, but for 10**8 the difference will be really big.

You can improve it a little more by incrementing the range you check by 2, and thereby only checking odd numbers. Like so:

import math
print 2
for num in range(3,101,2):
    if all(num%i!=0 for i in range(2,int(math.sqrt(num))+1)):
       print num

Edited:

As in the first loop odd numbers are selected, in the second loop no need to check with even numbers, so 'i' value can be start with 3 and skipped by 2.

import math
print 2
for num in range(3,101,2):
    if all(num%i!=0 for i in range(3,int(math.sqrt(num))+1, 2)):
        print num
  • Great job, but why do you ignore the number 1 ? One is not considered a prime number. Kindly see this article primes.utm.edu/notes/faq/one.html – Mouneer Jul 4 '15 at 18:38
  • Change your range(1,101) to range(2,101) and the code will be perfect. Let's not forget 1 is not a prime. – Akash Adhikari Nov 1 '17 at 13:24
  • No need to import math. Just use **.5 – Zaz Nov 7 '18 at 0:15
11

break ends the loop that it is currently in. So, you are only ever checking if it divisible by 2, giving you all odd numbers.

for num in range(2,101):
    for i in range(2,num):
        if (num%i==0):
            break
    else:
        print(num)

that being said, there are much better ways to find primes in python than this.

for num in range(2,101):
    if is_prime(num):
        print(num)

def is_prime(n):
    for i in range(2, int(math.sqrt(n)) + 1):
        if n % i == 0:
            return False
    return True
  • 1
    here is a page from the python doc describing break/continue, with an example of printing primes! docs.python.org/tutorial/controlflow.html (section 4.4) – kaveman Jul 23 '12 at 20:26
  • No, you are wrong, of course. continue will not help here. Please write the solution wit continue if you think you are right – Igor Chubin Jul 23 '12 at 20:32
  • +1. except that 1 is not a prime. :) – Will Ness Jul 24 '12 at 14:29
8

Instead of trial division, a better approach, invented by the Greek mathematician Eratosthenes over two thousand years ago, is to sieve by repeatedly casting out multiples of primes.

Begin by making a list of all numbers from 2 to the maximum desired prime n. Then repeatedly take the smallest uncrossed number and cross out all of its multiples; the numbers that remain uncrossed are prime.

For example, consider the numbers less than 30. Initially, 2 is identified as prime, then 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28 and 30 are crossed out. Next 3 is identified as prime, then 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27 and 30 are crossed out. The next prime is 5, so 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 are crossed out. And so on. The numbers that remain are prime: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, and 29.

def primes(n):
  sieve = [True] * (n+1)
  for p in range(2, n+1):
    if (sieve[p]):
      print p
      for i in range(p, n+1, p):
        sieve[i] = False

An optimized version of the sieve handles 2 separately and sieves only odd numbers. Also, since all composites less than the square of the current prime are crossed out by smaller primes, the inner loop can start at p^2 instead of p and the outer loop can stop at the square root of n. I'll leave the optimized version for you to work on.

  • 1
    +1 for teaching me something :) – Rob Wagner Jul 24 '12 at 14:35
  • the sieve has pretty bad performance, I doubt it would be faster than trying a division, especially if you only try until the square root. – hochl Jun 19 '15 at 10:51
  • 1
    @hochl you're mistaken; see primesieve.org for the counterexample. – Will Ness Jun 24 '15 at 22:31
  • Wow, didn't know that -- but's its incredibly complex and uses multiple cores ... O.o but interesting -- thanks! :) – hochl Jun 25 '15 at 0:53
  • @hochl: It doesn't have to be complex. Using the optimized version of the sieve that I discussed above, it takes a third of a second to compute the primes to a million. Using the corresponding trial division takes over twenty times longer. Code at ideone.com/5U2Wns. The code at primesieve.org is more complicated, but much faster still. – user448810 Jun 25 '15 at 18:05
4

I'm a proponent of not assuming the best solution and testing it. Below are some modifications I did to create simple classes of examples by both @igor-chubin and @user448810. First off let me say it's all great information, thank you guys. But I have to acknowledge @user448810 for his clever solution, which turns out to be the fastest by far (of those I tested). So kudos to you, sir! In all examples I use a values of 1 million (1,000,000) as n.

Please feel free to try the code out.

Good luck!

Method 1 as described by Igor Chubin:

def primes_method1(n):
    out = list()
    for num in range(1, n+1):
        prime = True
        for i in range(2, num):
            if (num % i == 0):
                prime = False
        if prime:
            out.append(num)
    return out

Benchmark: Over 272+ seconds

Method 2 as described by Igor Chubin:

def primes_method2(n):
    out = list()
    for num in range(1, n+1):
        if all(num % i != 0 for i in range(2, num)):
            out.append(num)
    return out

Benchmark: 73.3420000076 seconds

Method 3 as described by Igor Chubin:

def primes_method3(n):
    out = list()
    for num in range(1, n+1):
        if all(num % i != 0 for i in range(2, int(num**.5 ) + 1)):
            out.append(num)
    return out

Benchmark: 11.3580000401 seconds

Method 4 as described by Igor Chubin:

def primes_method4(n):
    out = list()
    out.append(2)
    for num in range(3, n+1, 2):
        if all(num % i != 0 for i in range(2, int(num**.5 ) + 1)):
            out.append(num)
    return out

Benchmark: 8.7009999752 seconds

Method 5 as described by user448810 (which I thought was quite clever):

def primes_method5(n):
    out = list()
    sieve = [True] * (n+1)
    for p in range(2, n+1):
        if (sieve[p]):
            out.append(p)
            for i in range(p, n+1, p):
                sieve[i] = False
    return out

Benchmark: 1.12000012398 seconds

Notes: Solution 5 listed above (as proposed by user448810) turned out to be the fastest and honestly quiet creative and clever. I love it. Thanks guys!!

EDIT: Oh, and by the way, I didn't feel there was any need to import the math library for the square root of a value as the equivalent is just (n**.5). Otherwise I didn't edit much other then make the values get stored in and output array to be returned by the class. Also, it would probably be a bit more efficient to store the results to a file than verbose and could save a lot on memory if it was just one at a time but would cost a little bit more time due to disk writes. I think there is always room for improvement though. So hopefully the code makes sense guys.

2

The best way to solve the above problem would be to use the "Miller Rabin Primality Test" algorithm. It uses a probabilistic approach to find if a number is prime or not. And it is by-far the most efficient algorithm I've come across for the same.

The python implementation of the same is demonstrated below:

def miller_rabin(n, k):

    # Implementation uses the Miller-Rabin Primality Test
    # The optimal number of rounds for this test is 40
    # See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6325576/how-many-iterations-of-rabin-miller-should-i-use-for-cryptographic-safe-primes
    # for justification

    # If number is even, it's a composite number

    if n == 2:
        return True

    if n % 2 == 0:
        return False

    r, s = 0, n - 1
    while s % 2 == 0:
        r += 1
        s //= 2
    for _ in xrange(k):
        a = random.randrange(2, n - 1)
        x = pow(a, s, n)
        if x == 1 or x == n - 1:
            continue
        for _ in xrange(r - 1):
            x = pow(x, 2, n)
            if x == n - 1:
                break
        else:
            return False
    return True
2

A Python Program function module that returns the 1'st N prime numbers:

def get_primes(count):
    """
        Return the 1st count prime integers.
    """
    result = []
    x=2
    while len(result) in range(count):
        i=2
        flag=0
        for i in range(2,x):
            if x%i == 0:
                flag+=1
                break
            i=i+1
        if flag == 0:
            result.append(x)
        x+=1
    pass
    return result
1

My way of listing primes to an entry number without too much hassle is using the property that you can get any number that is not a prime with the summation of primes.

Therefore, if you divide the entry number with all primes below it, and it is not evenly divisible by any of them, you know that you have a prime.

Of course there are still faster ways of getting the primes, but this one already performs quite well, especially because you are not dividing the entry number by any number, but quite only the primes all the way to that number.

With this code I managed on my computer to list all primes up to 100 000 in less than 4 seconds.

import time as t

start = t.clock()

primes = [2,3,5,7]

for num in xrange(3,100000,2):
    if all(num%x != 0 for x in primes):
        primes.append(num)

print primes
print t.clock() - start
print sum(primes)
0

Print n prime numbers using python:

num = input('get the value:')
for i in range(2,num+1):
    count = 0
    for j in range(2,i):
        if i%j != 0:
            count += 1
    if count == i-2:
        print i,
0

Igor Chubin's answer can be improved. When testing if X is prime, the algorithm doesn't have to check every number up to the square root of X, it only has to check the prime numbers up to the sqrt(X). Thus, it can be more efficient if it refers to the list of prime numbers as it is creating it. The function below outputs a list of all primes under b, which is convenient as a list for several reasons (e.g. when you want to know the number of primes < b). By only checking the primes, it saves time at higher numbers (compare at around 10,000; the difference is stark).

from math import sqrt
def lp(b)
    primes = [2]
    for c in range(3,b):
        e = round(sqrt(c)) + 1
        for d in primes:
            if d <= e and c%d == 0:
                break
        else:
            primes.extend([c])
    return primes
  • that's inefficient: for a candidate that is prime this will visit all the previous primes (and test them for d <= e). The loop should be broken from always, after the sqrt has been reached. – Will Ness Aug 4 '13 at 18:11
  • or remove the sqrt completely since it is an expensive operation and compare the squares, i.e. for d in primes: if d*d > c: ... – hochl Jun 19 '15 at 10:34
0

Here's a simple and intuitive version of checking whether it's a prime in a RECURSIVE function! :) (I did it as a homework assignment for an MIT class) In python it runs very fast until 1900. IF you try more than 1900, you'll get an interesting error :) (Would u like to check how many numbers your computer can manage?)

def is_prime(n, div=2):

    if div> n/2.0: return True

    if n% div == 0:
        return False
    else:
        div+=1
        return is_prime(n,div)

#The program:
until = 1000
for i in range(until):
    if is_prime(i):
        print i

Of course... if you like recursive functions, this small code can be upgraded with a dictionary to seriously increase its performance, and avoid that funny error. Here's a simple Level 1 upgrade with a MEMORY integration:

import datetime
def is_prime(n, div=2):
    global primelist
    if div> n/2.0: return True
    if div < primelist[0]:
        div = primelist[0]
        for x in primelist:
            if x ==0 or x==1: continue
            if n % x == 0:
                return False
    if n% div == 0:
        return False
    else:
        div+=1
        return is_prime(n,div)


now = datetime.datetime.now()
print 'time and date:',now
until = 100000
primelist=[]
for i in range(until):
    if is_prime(i):
        primelist.insert(0,i)
print "There are", len(primelist),"prime numbers, until", until
print primelist[0:100], "..."

finish = datetime.datetime.now()
print "It took your computer", finish - now , " to calculate it"

Here are the resuls, where I printed the last 100 prime numbers found.

time and date: 2013-10-15 13:32:11.674448

There are 9594 prime numbers, until 100000

[99991, 99989, 99971, 99961, 99929, 99923, 99907, 99901, 99881, 99877, 99871, 99859, 99839, 99833, 99829, 99823, 99817, 99809, 99793, 99787, 99767, 99761, 99733, 99721, 99719, 99713, 99709, 99707, 99689, 99679, 99667, 99661, 99643, 99623, 99611, 99607, 99581, 99577, 99571, 99563, 99559, 99551, 99529, 99527, 99523, 99497, 99487, 99469, 99439, 99431, 99409, 99401, 99397, 99391, 99377, 99371, 99367, 99349, 99347, 99317, 99289, 99277, 99259, 99257, 99251, 99241, 99233, 99223, 99191, 99181, 99173, 99149, 99139, 99137, 99133, 99131, 99119, 99109, 99103, 99089, 99083, 99079, 99053, 99041, 99023, 99017, 99013, 98999, 98993, 98981, 98963, 98953, 98947, 98939, 98929, 98927, 98911, 98909, 98899, 98897] ...

It took your computer 0:00:40.871083 to calculate it

So It took 40 seconds for my i7 laptop to calculate it. :)

  • there are 9592 primes below 100000 and it took my old slow laptop 0.01 seconds to calculate it. without looking into it, maybe your algorithm isn't optimal. – Will Ness Sep 8 '14 at 7:19
  • @WillNess of course not! If you want a more efficient algorithm check: PG7.8 from en.wikibooks.org/wiki/… My algorithm is Fun cause anyone can GET it why it works! :) – moldovean Sep 10 '14 at 19:29
  • I've seen that page, and it is... not good. its algorithm is not efficient. It does reinvent the wheel optimization, but uses it with trial division, instead of the sieve of Eratosthenes, which is much, much, much faster. -- about your first code: with one small correction it runs in 1.3 sec on Ideone (which is about 3x slower than your i7 - so, a 100x speedup!), and converted to loop instead of recursion - 0.77 sec. You just need to overwrite three characters in your code. :) – Will Ness Sep 10 '14 at 22:51
  • Recursive functions are fun though... :) i will think how to improve it a lil bit – moldovean Sep 11 '14 at 11:35
  • I'll give you another hint: all three characters are together, one next to the other. Just type something new over them, replacing them with three new characters. – Will Ness Sep 11 '14 at 12:03
0
def prime_number(a):
    yes=[]
    for i in range (2,100):
        if (i==2 or i==3 or i==5 or i==7) or (i%2!=0 and i%3!=0 and i%5!=0 and i%7!=0 and i%(i**(float(0.5)))!=0):
            yes=yes+[i]
    print (yes)
  • yes=[2,3,5,7]; for i in range (8,100): if (i%2!=0 and ... and i%7!=0): yes+=[i]. – Will Ness Sep 8 '14 at 7:05
0
# computes first n prime numbers
def primes(n=1):
    from math import sqrt
    count = 1
    plist = [2]
    c = 3
    if n <= 0 :
        return "Error : integer n not >= 0"
    while (count <= n - 1):    # n - 1 since 2 is already in plist
        pivot = int(sqrt(c))
        for i in plist:
            if i > pivot :    # check for primae factors 'till sqrt c
                count+= 1
                plist.append(c)
                break
            elif c % i == 0 :
                break    # not prime, no need to iterate anymore
            else :
                continue 
        c += 2    # skipping even numbers              
    return plist
0
min=int(input("min:"))
max=int(input("max:"))
for num in range(min,max):
    for x in range(2,num):
        if(num%x==0 and num!=1):
            break
        else:
            print(num,"is prime")
            break
  • Could you please elaborate more your answer adding a little more description about the solution you provide? – abarisone Jun 19 '15 at 7:09
0

You are terminating the loop too early. After you have tested all possibilities in the body of the for loop, and not breaking, then the number is prime. As one is not prime you have to start at 2:

for num in xrange(2, 101):
    for i in range(2,num):
        if not num % i:
            break
    else:
        print num

In a faster solution you only try to divide by primes that are smaller or equal to the root of the number you are testing. This can be achieved by remembering all primes you have already found. Additionally, you only have to test odd numbers (except 2). You can put the resulting algorithm into a generator so you can use it for storing primes in a container or simply printing them out:

def primes(limit):
    if limit > 1:
        primes_found = [(2, 4)]
        yield 2
        for n in xrange(3, limit + 1, 2):
            for p, ps in primes_found:
                if ps > n:
                    primes_found.append((n, n * n))
                    yield n
                    break
                else:
                    if not n % p:
                        break

for i in primes(101):
    print i

As you can see there is no need to calculate the square root, it is faster to store the square for each prime number and compare each divisor with this number.

0

This is a sample program I wrote to check if a number is prime or not.

def is_prime(x):
    y=0
    if x<=1:
        return False
    elif x == 2:
        return True
    elif x%2==0:
        return False
    else:
        root = int(x**.5)+2
        for i in xrange (2,root):
            if x%i==0:
                return False
                y=1
        if y==0:
            return True
0
n = int(raw_input('Enter the integer range to find prime no :'))
p = 2
while p<n:
  i = p
  cnt = 0
  while i>1:
    if p%i == 0:
        cnt+=1
    i-=1
  if cnt == 1:
     print "%s is Prime Number"%p
  else:
     print "%s is Not Prime Number"%p
  p+=1
0

Using filter function.

l=range(1,101)
for i in range(2,10): # for i in range(x,y), here y should be around or <= sqrt(101)
    l = filter(lambda x: x==i or x%i, l)

print l
0
for num in range(1,101):
    prime = True
    for i in range(2,num/2):
        if (num%i==0):
            prime = False
    if prime:
       print num
0

How about this? Reading all the suggestions I used this:

prime=[2]+[num for num in xrange(3,m+1,2) if all(num%i!=0 for i in range(2,int(math.sqrt(num))+1))]

Prime numbers up to 1000000

root@nfs:/pywork# time python prime.py

78498

real 0m6.600s

user 0m6.532s

sys 0m0.036s

0
f=0
sum=0
for i in range(1,101):
    for j in range(1,i+1):
        if(i%j==0):
            f=f+1
    if(f==2):
        sum=sum+i
        print i        
    f=0
print sum
  • It's good practice on Stack Overflow to add an explanation as to why your solution should work. For more information read How To Answer. – Samuel Liew Dec 19 '18 at 22:14
0

The fastest & best implementation of omitting primes:

def PrimeRanges2(a, b):
    arr = range(a, b+1)
    up = int(math.sqrt(b)) + 1
    for d in range(2, up):
        arr = omit_multi(arr, d)
0

Here is a different approach that trades space for faster search time. This may be fastest so.

import math

def primes(n):
    if n < 2:
        return []
    numbers = [0]*(n+1)
    primes = [2]
    # Mark all odd numbers as maybe prime, leave evens marked composite.
    for i in xrange(3, n+1, 2):
        numbers[i] = 1

    sqn = int(math.sqrt(n))
    # Starting with 3, look at each odd number.
    for i in xrange(3, len(numbers), 2):
        # Skip if composite.
        if numbers[i] == 0:
            continue
        # Number is prime.  Would have been marked as composite if there were
        # any smaller prime factors already examined.
        primes.append(i)
        if i > sqn:
            # All remaining odd numbers not marked composite must be prime.
            primes.extend([i for i in xrange(i+2, len(numbers), 2)
                           if numbers[i]])
            break
        # Mark all multiples of the prime as composite.  Check odd multiples.
        for r in xrange(i*i, len(numbers), i*2):
            numbers[r] = 0

    return primes

n = 1000000
p = primes(n)
print "Found", len(p), "primes <=", n
0

I was inspired by Igor and made a code block that creates a list:

def prime_number():

for num in range(2, 101):
    prime = True
    for i in range(2, num):
        if (num % i == 0):
            prime = False
    if prime and num not in num_list:
        num_list.append(num)
    else:
        pass
return num_list


num_list = []
prime_number()
print(num_list)
0

Adding to the accepted answer, further optimization can be achieved by using a list to store primes and printing them after generation.

import math
Primes_Upto = 101
Primes = [2]
for num in range(3,Primes_Upto,2):
    if all(num%i!=0 for i in Primes):
       Primes.append(num)
for i in Primes:
    print i
0

Here is the simplest logic for beginners to get prime numbers:

p=[]
for n in range(2,50):
    for k in range(2,50):
        if n%k ==0 and n !=k:
            break
        else:
            for t in p:
                if  n%t ==0:
                    break
            else:
                p.append(n)

print p
0
a=int(input('enter the lower no.'))
b=int(input('enter the higher no.'))
print("Prime numbers between",a,"and",b,"are:")
for num in range(a,b):

    if num>1:
        for i in range(2,num):
            if (num%i)==0:
                break
        else:
            print(num)
  • Welcome to SO. This post does not answer the OP's question, which was to ask for help on why his/her code did not work. Offering an alternative solution isn't the same thing. It's also a very old question and has a heavily up-voted accepted answer. See stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer for guidance. – Nick Jul 14 '18 at 16:08
  • It's good practice on Stack Overflow to add an explanation as to why your solution should work. For more information read How To Answer. – Samuel Liew Dec 19 '18 at 22:13
0

First we find factor of that number

def fac(n):
  res = []
  for i in range(1,n+1):
    if n%i == 0:
res.append(i)

Script to check prime or not

def prime(n):
return(fac(n) == [1,n])

Script to print all prime number upto n

def prime_list(n):
  pri_list = []
  for i in range(1,n+1):
    if prime(i)
      pri_list.append(i)
return(pri_list)
0

A simpler and more efficient way of solving this is storing all prime numbers found previously and checking if the next number is a multiple of any of the smaller primes.

n = 1000
primes = [2]

for i in range(3, n, 2):
    if not any(i % prime == 0 for prime in primes):
        primes.append(i)

print(primes)

Note that any is a short circuit function, in other words, it will break the loop as soon as a truthy value is found.

-1

Adding my own version, just to show some itertools tricks v2.7:

import itertools

def Primes():
    primes = []
    a = 2
    while True:
        if all(itertools.imap(lambda p : a % p, primes)):
            yield a
            primes.append(a)
        a += 1

# Print the first 100 primes
for _, p in itertools.izip(xrange(100), Primes()):
    print p
-1
num= int(input("Enter the numbner"))
isDivisible= False
int=2

while i<num:
    if num%i==0
    isDivisible True
    print("The number {} is divisible by {}.".format(num,i))
    i +=1

if isDivisible:
    print("The number {} is not prime.".format(num))
else:
    print("The number {} is a prime number.".format(num))
  • 1
    You may add some explanation to your code :) – blue-phoenox May 6 '18 at 10:10
  • Take input from the user then initialize variables isDivisible and i. Set isDivisible to False and i to 2. Then start while loop where the i value should be lesser than the number which has been given as input. Then use the modulo operator to check if the inputted number is divisible by num-1 values. If yes then it will display the number and tell that it is not a prime number. If it is not divisible by any of the i to num-1 values then it is a prime number. – Srikanth Reddy May 6 '18 at 11:50

protected by Samuel Liew Dec 19 '18 at 22:14

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