On my apache server I'd like to be able to redirect all incoming http requests to the equivalent https request. The catch is that I'd like to be able to do this for my default virtual host without specifying the ServerName and have the redirect work with whatever server name appeared in the request url. I'm hoping for something like this:

NameVirtualHost *:80
<VirtualHost *:80>
    RedirectPermanent / https://%{SERVER_NAME}/
    ...
</VirtualHost>

Is this possible using Redirect or will I have to resort to Rewrite?

up vote 92 down vote accepted

Try adding this in your vhost config:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ https://%{HTTP_HOST}$1 [R=301,L]
  • * You may need to add mod_rewrite. For ubuntu or debian-based hosts, the following would work: sudo a2enmod rewrite which would stop any configtest / apache2 configuration errors. (Which a stock setup would receive, provided you use the vhost additions provided above) – Joseph Orlando Nov 12 '14 at 5:28
  • this works only for the main domain (e.g http://mywebiste.com -> https://mywebiste.com) what if i've also subdomaind (http://blog.mywebiste.com->https://blog.mywebiste.com) ? – EsseTi Mar 13 '16 at 14:36
  • 11
    You may have to add RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off after RewriteEngine On otherwise you may get a ERR_TOO_MANY_REDIRECTS – Max Mar 24 '16 at 14:42
  • Small typo. A slash is missing, the rewriteRule should be https://%{HTTP_HOST}/$1 [R=301,L] – Dunatotatos Apr 12 at 14:50
  • 1
    @Dunatotatos in the vhost, the URI contains a leading /, but in an htaccess file, the / prefix is removed. If the rule was in an htaccess file, we'd indeed need a / before the $1 – Jon Lin Apr 12 at 15:26

Both works fine. But according to the Apache docs you should avoid using mod_rewrite for simple redirections, and use Redirect instead. So according to them, you should preferably do:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    ServerName www.example.com
    Redirect / https://www.example.com/
</VirtualHost>

<VirtualHost *:443>
    ServerName www.example.com
    # ... SSL configuration goes here
</VirtualHost>

The first / after Redirect is the url, the second part is where it should be redirected.

You can also use it to redirect URLs to a subdomain: Redirect /one/ http://one.example.com/

  • 32
    This doesn't answer Without specifying the ServerName part of the question – Zam Sunk Mar 31 '16 at 14:52

This is the complete way to omit unneeded redirects, too ;)

These rules are intended to be used in .htaccess files, as a RewriteRule in a *:80 VirtualHost entry needs no Conditions.

RewriteEngine on
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off [OR] 
RewriteCond %{HTTP:X-Forwarded-Proto} !https
RewriteRule ^/(.*) https://%{HTTP_HOST}/$1 [NC,R=301,L]

Eplanations:

RewriteEngine on

==> enable the engine at all

RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off [OR]

==> match on non-https connections, or (not setting [OR] would cause an implicit AND !)

RewriteCond %{HTTP:X-Forwarded-Proto} !https

==> match on forwarded connections (proxy, loadbalancer, etc.) without https

RewriteRule ^/(.*) https://%{HTTP_HOST}/$1 [NC,R=301,L]

==> if one of both Conditions match, do the rewrite of the whole URL, sending a 301 to have this 'learned' by the client (some do, some don't) and the L for the last rule.

  • Another problem, your RewriteRule will probably never match; pretty sure you want to drop the slash: RewriteRule ^(.*) … – Mark Fox Dec 2 '13 at 8:30
  • Pretty sure I won't. You missed the / syntax of the target including the 'L' flag. The other way is doing it like Jon Lin. – Jimmy Koerting Dec 2 '13 at 17:55
  • 8
    The RewriteCond is completely superfluous in this case; since the VirtualHost is already defined as <VirtualHost *:80>, %{SERVER_PORT} will never be 443 in the first place so the condition will always match. – Doktor J May 30 '14 at 16:34
  • * You may need to add mod_rewrite. For ubuntu or debian-based hosts, the following would work: sudo a2enmod rewrite which would stop any configtest / apache2 configuration errors. (Which a stock setup would receive, provided you use the vhost additions provided above) – Joseph Orlando Nov 12 '14 at 5:29

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