43

I'm defining a custom Exception on a model in rails as kind of a wrapper Exception: (begin[code]rescue[raise custom exception]end)

When I raise the Exception, I'd like to pass it some info about a) the instance of the model whose internal functions raise the error, and b) the error that was caught.

This is going on an automated import method of a model that gets populated by POST request to from foreign datasource.

tldr; How can one pass arguments to an Exception, given that you define the Exception yourself? I have an initialize method on that Exception but the raise syntax seems to only accept an Exception class and message, no optional parameters that get passed into the instantiation process.

65

create an instance of your exception with new:

class CustomException < StandardError
  def initialize(data)
    @data = data
  end
end
# => nil 
raise CustomException.new(bla: "blupp")
# CustomException: CustomException
  • 24
    I've been using this for a year now, and thought I'd add: now every time I want to do this and forget how, I take a peek at cancan's exceptions to remind myself. The last error follows very good form for more complicated exceptions. – Chris Keele Mar 31 '13 at 17:27
  • @vladCovaliov why would it fail? message is just empty – phoet Jan 21 '15 at 10:47
  • 4
    You should always add message = nil as your first arguments and call super(message) otherwise something like raise CustomError, :some_message will not set the message correctly. – vladCovaliov Jan 21 '15 at 11:49
  • @phoet Sorry, that's what I meant. I edited my post – vladCovaliov Jan 21 '15 at 11:50
  • 1
    the exception is just a plain ruby class. in order to get the value for :bla you would need to have a getter for @data and then access the hash key. – phoet Sep 20 '16 at 7:34
13

Solution:

class FooError < StandardError
  attr_reader :foo

  def initialize(foo)
   super
   @foo = foo
  end
end

This is the best way if you follow the Rubocop Style Guide and always pass your message as the second argument to raise:

raise FooError.new('the foo'), 'bar baz'

You can get foo like this:

rescue FooError => error
  error.foo     # => 'the foo'
  error.message # => 'bar baz'

If you want to define the error message in FooError then write:

class FooError < StandardError
  attr_reader :foo

  def initialize(foo)
   super
   @foo = foo
  end

  def message
    "The foo is: #{foo}"
  end
end

Explanation:

Pass your message as the second argument to raise

As the Rubocop Style Guide says, the message and the exception class should be provided as separate arguments because if you write:

raise FooError.new('bar baz')

And want to pass a backtrace to raise, there is no way to do it without passing the message twice:

raise FooError.new('bar baz'), 'bar baz', other_error.backtrace

As this answer says, you will need to pass a backtrace if you want to re-raise an exception as a new instance with the same backtrace and a different message or data.

In initialize, call super, not super(message)

Here's three different ways of implementing FooError with test code you can run in Pry:

class SuperError < StandardError
  attr_reader :foo

  def initialize(foo)
   super
   @foo = foo
  end
end

class SuperWithMessageError < StandardError
  attr_reader :foo

  def initialize(foo)
   super(message)
   @foo = foo
  end
end

class SuperWithMessageArgumentError < StandardError
  attr_reader :foo

  def initialize(message = nil, foo)
   super(message)
   @foo = foo
  end
end

# All three classes behave the same except in this case:

raise SuperError, 'bar'
_ex_.foo     # => 'bar'
_ex_.message # => 'bar'

raise SuperWithMessageError, 'bar'
_ex_.foo     # => 'bar'
_ex_.message # => 'SuperWithMessageError'

raise SuperWithMessageArgumentError, 'bar'
_ex_.foo     # => 'bar'
_ex_.message # => 'SuperWithMessageArgumentError'

In SuperWithMessageError and SuperWithMessageArgumentError the message doesn't get set correctly, so SuperError is the correct implementation.

  • i' m on the same kind of problem ,& when i do somthing like this @foo stays nil , and foo is in message like self.message inside a class FooError like custom error class ... :`( – plombix Jun 2 '16 at 0:11
8

Here is a sample code adding a code to an error:

class MyCustomError < StandardError
    attr_reader :code

    def initialize(code)
        @code = code
    end

    def to_s
        "[#{code}] #{super}"
    end
end

And to raise it: raise MyCustomError.new(code), message

-2

You can create an new instance of your Exception subclass, then raise that. For instance:

begin
  # do something
rescue => e
  error = MyException.new(e, 'some info')
  raise error
end

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