10

I'm trying to use UNIX sockets for inter-thread communication. The program is only intended to run on Linux. To avoid creating the socket files, I wanted to use "abstract" sockets, as documented in unix(7).

However, I don't seem to be able to connect to these sockets. Everything works if I'm using "pathname" sockets, though.

Here is the code (I haven't quoted any error handling, but it's done): thread#1:

int log_socket = socket(AF_LOCAL, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
struct sockaddr_un logaddr;
socklen_t sun_len = sizeof(struct sockaddr_un);
logaddr.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
logaddr.sun_path[0] = 0;
strcpy(logaddr.sun_path+1, "futurama");
bind(log_socket, &logaddr, sun_len);
listen(log_socket, 5);
accept(log_socket, &logaddr, &sun_len);
... // send - receive

thread#2:

struct sockaddr_un tolog;
int sock = socket(AF_LOCAL, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
tolog.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
tolog.sun_path[0] = 0;
strcpy(tolog.sun_path+1, "futurama");
connect(sock, (struct sockaddr*)&tolog, sizeof(struct sockaddr_un));

If all I do in the above code, is change the sun_path to not have leading \0, things work perfect.

strace output:

t1: socket(PF_FILE, SOCK_STREAM, 0)         = 0
t1: bind(0, {sa_family=AF_FILE, path=@"futurama"}, 110)
t1: listen(0, 5)
t2: socket(PF_FILE, SOCK_STREAM, 0) = 1
t2: connect(1, {sa_family=AF_FILE, path=@"futurama"}, 110 <unfinished ...>
t2: <... connect resumed> )     = -1 ECONNREFUSED (Connection refused)
t1: accept(0,  <unfinished ...>

I know that the connect comes before accept, that's not an issue (I tried making sure that accept() is called before connect(), same result. Also, things are fine if the socket is "pathname" anyway).

4
  • For communication between threads of the same process, an ordinary pipe(2) should be enough! And you could also use pipes if all the communicating processes and/or threads have the same parent process! Commented Jul 24, 2012 at 23:47
  • @BasileStarynkevitch pipe will not work in my case. I need multiple threads to send info, and receive a synchronous response before moving on. Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 0:18
  • You could have several pipes and use poll for multiplexing them. Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 0:19
  • 1
    @BasileStarynkevitch for this, I will have to know in advance how many maximum pipes to open, or limit access to one using locks. The socket approach has less overhead for such case. Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 0:29

4 Answers 4

17

While I was posting this question, and re-reading unix(7) man page, this wording caught my attention:

an abstract socket address is distinguished by the fact that sun_path[0] is a null byte (’\0’). All of the remaining bytes in sun_path define the "name" of the socket

So, if I bzero'ed the sun_path before filling in my name into it, things started to work. I figured that's not necessarily straight-forward. Additionally, as rightfully pointed out by @davmac and @StoneThrow, the number of those "remaining bytes" can be reduced by specifying only enough length of the socket address structure to cover the bytes you want to consider as your address. One way to do that is to use SUN_LEN macro, however, the first byte of the sun_path will have to be set to !0, as SUN_LEN uses strlen.

elaboration

If sun_path[0] is \0, The kernel uses the entirety of the remainder of sun_path as the name of the socket, whether it's \0-terminated or not, so all of that remainder counts. In my original code I would zero the first byte, and then strcpy() the socket name into the sun_path at position 1. Whatever gibberish that was in sun_path when the structure was allocated (especially likely to contain gibberish since it's allocated on the stack), and was included in the length of the socket structure (as passed to the syscalls), counted as the name of the socket, and was different in bind() and connect().

IMHO, strace should fix the way it displays abstract socket names, and display all the sun_path bytes from 1 to whatever the structure length that was supplied, if sun_path[0] is 0

11
  • so how does this answer the question? Commented Jul 24, 2012 at 23:51
  • 2
    @KarolyHorvath yes, exactly. Not altering the behavior so to speak, but just defining the socket address. ALL the bytes in sun_path matter, no matter what they are. Commented Jul 27, 2012 at 22:52
  • 1
    @PawelVeselov (in any case passing an "incomplete" sockaddr structure is actually quite portable, see man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/unix.7.html - under "Pathname sockets" - the recommended value of addrlen).
    – davmac
    Commented Nov 11, 2015 at 10:59
  • 1
    (Also, interesting, the page I linked to appears to be an updated version of the man page you quote. It says "The socket's address in this namespace is given by the additional bytes in sun_path that are covered by the specified length of the address structure." - not "all of the remaining bytes").
    – davmac
    Commented Nov 11, 2015 at 11:11
  • 1
    @PawelVeselov - This may not be useful anymore due to the age of this question, but I think the addrlen you're passing to bind() is incorrect: that value should be the length of the address, e.g. SUN_LEN(logaddr.sun_path) (and note: before and after using that macro you need to unset/set logaddr.sun_path[0] to NULL, respectively).
    – StoneThrow
    Commented May 17, 2017 at 20:50
4

The key of making sockets in abstract namespace work is providing the proper length to 'bind' and 'connect' commands. To avoid setting '\0' at the end of the address in sockaddr_un it should be copied with strncpy or alike.

It is already explained in Pawel's answer so I'm just going to give an example.

Server:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  //to remove warning for unused variables.
  int dummy = argc;
  dummy = (int)argv;

  int fdServer = 0;
  int fdClient = 0;
  int iErr     = 0;
  int n = 0;
  socklen_t addr_len = 0;
  char buff[1024];
  char resp[1024];

  const char* const pcSocketName = "/tmp/test";

  struct sockaddr_un serv_addr; 

  //set the structure with 'x' instead of 0 so that we're able 
  //to see the full socket name by 'cat /proc/net/unix'
  //you may try playing with addr_len and see the actual name 
  //reported in /proc/net/unix
  memset(&serv_addr, 'x', sizeof(serv_addr));
  serv_addr.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
  serv_addr.sun_path[0] = '\0';
  //sizeof(pcSocketName) returns the size of 'char*' this is why I use strlen
  strncpy(serv_addr.sun_path+1, pcSocketName, strlen(pcSocketName));

  fdServer = socket(PF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
  if(-1 == fdServer) {
    printf("socket() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    return(-1);
  }

  iErr = bind(fdServer, (struct sockaddr*)&serv_addr, offsetof(struct sockaddr_un, sun_path) + 1/*\0*/ + strlen(pcSocketName));

  if(0 != iErr) {
    printf("bind() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    return(-1);
  }

  iErr = listen(fdServer, 1);
  if(0 != iErr) {
    printf("listen() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    return(-1);
  }

  addr_len = sizeof(pcSocketName);
  while(1) {
    fdClient = accept(fdServer, (struct sockaddr*) &serv_addr, &addr_len);
    if(0 >= fdClient) {
      printf("accept() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
      return(-1);
    }

    memset(resp, 0, sizeof(resp));
    memset(buff, 0, sizeof(buff));
    n = recv(fdClient, buff, sizeof(buff), 0);
    if(0 > n) {
      printf("recv() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
      return(-1);
    }

    printf("[client]: %s\n", buff);
    sprintf(resp, "echo >> %s", buff);
    n = send(fdClient, resp, sizeof(resp), 0);
    if(0 > n) {
      printf("send() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
      return(-1);
    }
    printf("[server]: %s\n", resp);
  }

  close(fdServer);

  return(0);
}

Client:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  //to remove warning for unused variables.
  int dummy = argc;
  dummy = (int)argv;

  int fdClient = 0;
  struct sockaddr_un serv_addr;
  int iErr     = 0;
  const char* const pcSocketName = "/tmp/test";

  char buff[1024];

  memset(&serv_addr, 0, sizeof(serv_addr));
  serv_addr.sun_family = AF_UNIX;
  serv_addr.sun_path[0] = '\0';
  strncpy(serv_addr.sun_path+1, pcSocketName, strlen(pcSocketName));

  fdClient = socket(PF_UNIX, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
  if(-1 == fdClient) {
    printf("socket() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    return(-1);
  }

  iErr = connect(fdClient, (struct sockaddr*) &serv_addr, offsetof(struct sockaddr_un, sun_path) + 1/*\0*/ + strlen(pcSocketName));
  if(0 != iErr) {
    printf("connect() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    return(-1);
  }

  memset(buff, 0, sizeof(buff));
  sprintf(buff, "Hello from client!");


  printf("[client]: %s\n", buff);
  iErr = send(fdClient, buff, sizeof(buff), 0);
  if(0 > iErr){
    printf("write() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    return(-1);
  }

  iErr = recv(fdClient, buff, sizeof(buff), 0);
  if(0 > iErr){
    printf("read() failed: [%d][%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
    return(-1);
  }

  printf("[server]: %s\n", buff);

  return(0);
}
1

In my case, replacing strncpy() to snprintf() and increasing copy size to UNIX_PATH_MAX solved the problem.

Original

strncpy(server_addr.sun_path, SOCKET_PATH, sizeof(SOCKET_PATH));

Modified

snprintf(server_addr.sun_path, UNIX_PATH_MAX, SOCKET_PATH);

Hope it helps.

0

Not sure how SOCKET_PATH is defined, but if it's a string literal as I suspect, then sizeof(SOCKET_PATH) will be the size of a char*, typically either 4 or 8 bytes.

1
  • Incorrect. sizeof("ABCDEF") is 7 (1 more than the number of bytes). The type of a string literal is an array, not a pointer. In most contexts an array is converted to a pointer, but they are not the same. Commented Feb 14, 2020 at 1:59

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