3

Here's an example of the iPhone EditText control.:

enter image description here

How can I create the same control in Android?

2
  • 6
    Not sure why you want to replicate iPhone UX on Android. it'll look completely out of place. Jul 25, 2012 at 7:19
  • The easiest would probably be to just ask the person who makes the graphics to include the gradient in the .PNG your using.
    – Slickelito
    Jul 25, 2012 at 7:20

3 Answers 3

37

Three kinds of EditText backgrounds

Basically, I see three ways to do what you want.

1st approach:

The first is, as Akki says, make a 9-patch that exactly duplicates the gradient-filled box that you want to use from (unspecified other platform). This lets your app look as close as possible to exactly the same on both platforms.

Here is a 9-patch made from your screen shot above. (This is res/drawable-*dpi/rounded_text_field.9.png)

Nine-patch background

2nd approach:

The second is to get the same effect using scalable native drawing capabilities. This won't look exactly the same, but delivers arguably smoother results.

Here is some code to generate a rounded-rect image with a gradient fill. (This is res/drawable/gradientbg.xml)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" 
android:shape="rectangle"
>
<corners android:radius="8dp"/>
<stroke android:width="2dp"
    android:color="#444"/>
<gradient 
   android:startColor="#888"
   android:centerColor="#fff"
   android:endColor="#fff"
   android:type="linear"
   android:angle="270"
   />
</shape>

Actually, I lied. In my original screen shot, the corners are much too big, so I reduced the corner radius from 16dp to 8dp. Here's what it looks like now. Much improved, don't you think? And a lot easier than tweaking a bitmap in 4 different densities.

Gradient background with 8dp radius corners.

3rd approach:

The third approach is to let the platform be what it will, and look the best that it can within its own paradigm. This has the advantage that, on different versions of the OS, your app will blend seamlessly with the rest of the system, even as the system theme changes.

Here's the default EditText running the exact same code on Gingerbread. It would look pretty out of place on a Holo-themed device (such as the Jellybean-powered tablet that I used to create the first screenshot), and vice-versa.

EditText on Gingerbread

For reference, here is the layout that contains all three EditTexts.

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
android:layout_width="match_parent"
android:layout_height="match_parent"
android:layout_margin="32dp"
android:orientation="vertical"
 >
<EditText
    android:id="@+id/editText1"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_marginBottom="24dp"
    android:layout_marginTop="24dp"
    android:padding="12dp"
    android:gravity="center"
    android:background="@drawable/rounded_text_field"
    android:inputType="text"
    android:textColor="@android:color/black"
    android:text="9-patch background." >
    <requestFocus />
</EditText>
<EditText
    android:id="@+id/editText2"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_marginBottom="24dp"
    android:layout_marginTop="24dp"
    android:padding="12dp"
    android:gravity="center"
    android:background="@drawable/gradientbg"
    android:inputType="text"
    android:textColor="@android:color/black"
    android:text="Gradient background." />
<EditText
    android:id="@+id/editText2"
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:layout_marginBottom="24dp"
    android:layout_marginTop="24dp"
    android:padding="12dp"
    android:gravity="center"
    android:inputType="text"
    android:text="Default background." />
</LinearLayout>
2
  • 3
    Sparky is right, although you can replicate the look and feel of the iOS control it is strongly recommended that you use controls that match the look and feel of the Android platform. This provides a more consistent experience for your users across other apps on the Android platform. Jul 25, 2012 at 10:23
  • 1
    For best practices on creating Android UI, see the Android Design pages. developer.android.com/design
    – Sparky
    Jul 25, 2012 at 10:50
1

All you have to do is create a small nine patch image and set that image to background of your EditText. here is a example of image

image

And here is how nine patch images works

0

i'm not sure if you can do that but you can search for iPhone like backgrounds. Search for "iPhone stencils" PS : i too have a crazy client who wants iPhone like design in his android apps, i think doing that is totally absurd.

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