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I found on net Fast Inverse Square Root on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_inverse_square_root . Does it work properly on x64 ? Did anyone use and serious test ?

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  • 12
    As a side note, those tricks are from times when floating point was either unsupported or slow. Though a normal square root and division may still be regarded slow, nowadays you also have SSE (especially on x64) and its own inverse square root (intrinsic: _mm_rsqrt_ss/ps) is probably faster and more precise than Carmack's hack. Of course it still only works for 32-bit floats, but you don't use doubles for inaccurate approximate values anyway. Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 7:29
  • @ChristianRau Update from 2019: There's a version for floats that has extreme accuracy on Wikipedia's Fast Inverse Square Root page.
    – S.S. Anne
    Commented Aug 20, 2019 at 20:05

3 Answers 3

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Originally Fast Inverse Square Root was written for a 32-bit float, so as long as you operate on IEEE-754 floating point representation, there is no way x64 architecture will affect the result.

Note that for "double" precision floating point (64-bit) you should use another constant:

...the "magic number" for 64 bit IEEE754 size type double ... was shown to be exactly 0x5fe6eb50c7b537a9

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Here is an implementation for double precision floats:

#include <cstdint>

double invsqrtQuake( double number )
  {
      double y = number;
      double x2 = y * 0.5;
      std::int64_t i = *(std::int64_t *) &y;
      // The magic number is for doubles is from https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/~m32rober/rsqrt.pdf
      i = 0x5fe6eb50c7b537a9 - (i >> 1);
      y = *(double *) &i;
      y = y * (1.5 - (x2 * y * y));   // 1st iteration
      //      y  = y * ( 1.5 - ( x2 * y * y ) );   // 2nd iteration, this can be removed
      return y;
  }

I did a few tests and it seems to work fine

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  • *(std::int64_t *) &y; has strict-aliasing UB. Use memcpy, or C++20 std::bit_cast. Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 19:08
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Yes, it works if using the correct magic number and corresponding integer type. In addition to the answers above, here's a C++11 implementation that works for both double and float. Conditionals should optimise out at compile time.

template <typename T, char iterations = 2> inline T inv_sqrt(T x) {
    static_assert(std::is_floating_point<T>::value, "T must be floating point");
    static_assert(iterations == 1 or iterations == 2, "itarations must equal 1 or 2");
    typedef typename std::conditional<sizeof(T) == 8, std::int64_t, std::int32_t>::type Tint;
    T y = x;
    T x2 = y * 0.5;
    Tint i = *(Tint *)&y;
    i = (sizeof(T) == 8 ? 0x5fe6eb50c7b537a9 : 0x5f3759df) - (i >> 1);
    y = *(T *)&i;
    y = y * (1.5 - (x2 * y * y));
    if (iterations == 2)
        y = y * (1.5 - (x2 * y * y));
    return y;
}

As for testing, I use the following doctest in my project:

#ifdef DOCTEST_LIBRARY_INCLUDED
    TEST_CASE_TEMPLATE("inv_sqrt", T, double, float) {
        std::vector<T> vals = {0.23, 3.3, 10.2, 100.45, 512.06};
        for (auto x : vals)
            CHECK(inv_sqrt<T>(x) == doctest::Approx(1.0 / std::sqrt(x)));
    }
#endif
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  • 1
    *(Tint *)&y has strict-aliasing UB. Use memcpy, or C++20 std::bit_cast. Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 19:09

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