9

In my Rails app, when creating a business I have a form that has the following field:

   <%= check_box_tag(:default_company) %> 
   <%= label_tag(:default_company, "Set Company as Default") %>

Essentially when I create a business, if they check this box, I need it to run something like the following code:

def set_default_company(company, user)
  exists = DefaultCompany.find(user.id)
  if exists
    exists.update_attributes(company: company)
  else  
    DefaultCompany.create(company: company, user: user)
  end
end

While learning, I would usually do that stuff in my controller but i'm trying to follow best practices and use a fat model, skinny controller, so I'm wanting to use logic like this:

def create
  @company = Company.new(params[:company])

  if @company.save
    if params[:default_company]
      Company.set_default_company(@company.id, current_user.id,)
    end
    flash[:notice] = "Company was successfully created."
    redirect_to @company
  else
    redirect_to new_company_path
  end
end

Here is where I am getting confused on whether to use a class method or an instance method, to call set_default_company. They both seem like they would work and I can't see a benefit to one or the other.

In addition to giving me any information as to which method to use, if someone could show me a brief implementation of writing that as a class method vs. instance method it may give me a better understanding as to why.

Here is how I would write them:

def self.set_default_company(company, user)
  # Logic here
end

def set_default_company(company, user)
  # Logic here
end

Writing them that way I don't see a benefit to either.

4 Answers 4

20

As their name suggests, instance methods on a model should be used for logic/operations that relate to a specific instance of a user (the one on which the method is called.) So you could think of setting the default company for a user as an instance method on User. Class methods are for things which don't operate on an individual instance of a model or for cases where you don't have the instance available to you. e.g. you might have a class method to tidy up your database such as User.purge_expired_users which would not apply to an individual user object.

e.g.

class User
  def set_default_company(company)
    exists = DefaultCompany.find(self.id)
    if exists
      exists.update_attributes(company: company)
    else  
      DefaultCompany.create(company: company, user: self)
    end
  end
end

then your controller method would look like:

def create
  @company = Company.new(params[:company])

  if @company.save
    if params[:default_company]
      current_user.set_default_company @company
    end
    flash[:notice] = "Company was successfully created."
    redirect_to @company
  else
    redirect_to new_company_path
  end
end

Alternatively, you could think of the relationship from the other perspective and put an instance method on Company e.g. company.set_as_default_for(user).

1
  • 2
    Very good description for class vs. instance, actually really cleared it up for me. You are correct I am going to move this to my user model rather then company, that makes the most sense and reads better. I have one last question. Instead of storing the default company in a table called Default Company which is a joining table of user_id and company_id, should I just have a "default_company" field in the user model? The reason I went with a joining table is because not all users will have a company, in fact most won't have a company, so I would have blank fields a lot.
    – ruevaughn
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 18:20
4

I would actually make set_default_company an instance method on User. A User has a default Company; why should a Company need to what users it is default for?

class User
    def set_default_company(company)
        exists = DefaultCompany.find(id)
        if exists
            exists.update_attributes(company: company)
        else  
            DefaultCompany.create(company: company, user: self)
         end
     end
 end
1
  • You are correct. I originally was going to do this but for some reason my thinking lead me away from that.
    – ruevaughn
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 18:14
2

In my opinion, I always create a class method if the method in question represents information/behavior that is quite generic among all the objects instantiated, different from the instance methods, that I use when I believe it's more like a specific action of the instantiated object in question.

But that is my point-of-view.

0
1

A few things: do you have a separate table for DefaultCompany? This seems like it should be a boolean flag on the company table.

Next, is there an association between companies and users? If so, it seems the best way to do it would be

In the user model

def set_default_company(company)
  self.companies.each do |c|
    c.update_attributes(:default => false)
  end
  company.update_attributes(:default => true)
end

Or in the Company model

def set_as_default
  update_attributes(:default_company => true)
end
11
  • I do have a separate table for DefaultCompany, the thinking that led me away from the boolean is that a user has_many companies through roles, so a user can have potentially many or no companies. So the boolean field doesn't really work in that case, I don't think
    – ruevaughn
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 18:17
  • Consider the case where a company has 5 users, if I set the company boolean field to true it would set it for all of the users, correct?
    – ruevaughn
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 18:22
  • Forgot to mention it was a companies have many users through roles and users have many companies through roles as well
    – ruevaughn
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 18:23
  • if each user can have only one default company, then the default should be a boolean on the roles table
    – Solomon
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 19:48
  • Hmmm yes that make sense, a user could in theory have a role of "Owner" and "Manager", so it seems to me like i'd have to keep track of both? Or I guess I would just check for all roles where user a belongs to company x and set all those roles to true, that seems better to you then a joining table?
    – ruevaughn
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 19:51

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