45

Is there PRIu128 that behaves similar to PRIu64 from <inttypes.h>:

printf("%" PRIu64 "\n", some_uint64_value);

Or converting manually digit by digit:

int print_uint128(uint128_t n) {
  if (n == 0)  return printf("0\n");

  char str[40] = {0}; // log10(1 << 128) + '\0'
  char *s = str + sizeof(str) - 1; // start at the end
  while (n != 0) {
    if (s == str) return -1; // never happens

    *--s = "0123456789"[n % 10]; // save last digit
    n /= 10;                     // drop it
  }
  return printf("%s\n", s);
}

is the only option?

Note that uint128_t is my own typedef for __uint128_t.

  • 1
    Rather than performing the print in the function, I'd return a string representation, so I could do things with it other than directly print it. – Wug Jul 25 '12 at 18:34
  • @DanielFischer: char str[40] = {0}; filled the whole array with zero already. – kennytm Jul 25 '12 at 18:38
  • @Wug: yes. Normally I would. It is just an example to avoid the boiler-plate with passing buffers around. – jfs Jul 25 '12 at 18:38
  • 2
    @Wug: it is not C++. – jfs Jul 25 '12 at 18:39
  • 2
    Be careful of GCC's __uint128_t. It caused us problems on a number of platforms, like ARM64, ARMEL and S/390. We had to give up using it because it was so buggy. For example, GCC calculated the result of u = 93 - 0 - 0 - 0 (using the 128-bit types) as 18446744073709551615 on ARM64. – jww Apr 22 '16 at 7:45

11 Answers 11

14

No there isn't support in the library for printing these types. They aren't even extended integer types in the sense of the C standard.

Your idea for starting the printing from the back is a good one, but you could use much larger chunks. In some tests for P99 I have such a function that uses

uint64_t const d19 = UINT64_C(10000000000000000000);

as the largest power of 10 that fits into an uint64_t.

As decimal, these big numbers get unreadable very soon so another, easier, option is to print them in hex. Then you can do something like

  uint64_t low = (uint64_t)x;
  // This is UINT64_MAX, the largest number in 64 bit
  // so the longest string that the lower half can occupy
  char buf[] = { "18446744073709551615" };
  sprintf(buf, "%" PRIX64, low);

to get the lower half and then basically the same with

  uint64_t high = (x >> 64);

for the upper half.

  • Why are they not extended integer types in the sense of C (N1256 6.2.5 "Types" I suppose) ? It is true that sizeof(intmax_t) gives me 8 and not 16. Why? – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心996ICU六四事件 May 19 '15 at 15:15
  • Ah, asked for C++ at: stackoverflow.com/questions/21265462/… Shame, as that would allow %ju of course. – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心996ICU六四事件 May 19 '15 at 15:54
  • 1
    char buf[] = { "18446744073709551615" }; would benefit with a comment to explain that magic number - used to worst case-size the buffer if printed in hex/decimal. Clever idea. – chux Aug 9 '16 at 15:01
  • @chux, thanks. done. – Jens Gustedt Aug 9 '16 at 15:09
  • That UINT64_MAX is the longest it could be in decimal, not hex (which would be shorter, 16 hex digits of course). Btw, a clever way to the decimal version would be to use the preprocessor to generate the string by "string-izing" UINT64_MAX. – arjunyg Dec 4 '17 at 1:25
28

The GCC 4.7.1 manual says:

6.8 128-bits integers

As an extension the integer scalar type __int128 is supported for targets having an integer mode wide enough to hold 128-bit. Simply write __int128 for a signed 128-bit integer, or unsigned __int128 for an unsigned 128-bit integer. There is no support in GCC to express an integer constant of type __int128 for targets having long long integer with less then [sic] 128 bit width.

Interestingly, although that does not mention __uint128_t, that type is accepted, even with stringent warnings set:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    __uint128_t u128 = 12345678900987654321;
    printf("%llx\n", (unsigned long long)(u128 & 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF));
    return(0);
}

Compilation:

$ gcc -O3 -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic xxx.c -o xxx  
xxx.c: In function ‘main’:
xxx.c:6:24: warning: integer constant is so large that it is unsigned [enabled by default]
$

(This is with a home-compiled GCC 4.7.1 on Mac OS X 10.7.4.)

Change the constant to 0x12345678900987654321 and the compiler says:

xxx.c: In function ‘main’:
xxx.c:6:24: warning: integer constant is too large for its type [enabled by default]

So, it isn't easy manipulating these creatures. The outputs with the decimal constant and hex constants are:

ab54a98cdc6770b1
5678900987654321

For printing in decimal, your best bet is to see if the value is larger than UINT64_MAX; if it is, then you divide by the largest power of 10 that is smaller than UINT64_MAX, print that number (and you might need to repeat the process a second time), then print the residue modulo the largest power of 10 that is smaller than UINT64_MAX, remembering to pad with leading zeroes.

This leads to something like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

/*
** Using documented GCC type unsigned __int128 instead of undocumented
** obsolescent typedef name __uint128_t.  Works with GCC 4.7.1 but not
** GCC 4.1.2 (but __uint128_t works with GCC 4.1.2) on Mac OS X 10.7.4.
*/
typedef unsigned __int128 uint128_t;

/*      UINT64_MAX 18446744073709551615ULL */
#define P10_UINT64 10000000000000000000ULL   /* 19 zeroes */
#define E10_UINT64 19

#define STRINGIZER(x)   # x
#define TO_STRING(x)    STRINGIZER(x)

static int print_u128_u(uint128_t u128)
{
    int rc;
    if (u128 > UINT64_MAX)
    {
        uint128_t leading  = u128 / P10_UINT64;
        uint64_t  trailing = u128 % P10_UINT64;
        rc = print_u128_u(leading);
        rc += printf("%." TO_STRING(E10_UINT64) PRIu64, trailing);
    }
    else
    {
        uint64_t u64 = u128;
        rc = printf("%" PRIu64, u64);
    }
    return rc;
}

int main(void)
{
    uint128_t u128a = ((uint128_t)UINT64_MAX + 1) * 0x1234567890ABCDEFULL +
                      0xFEDCBA9876543210ULL;
    uint128_t u128b = ((uint128_t)UINT64_MAX + 1) * 0xF234567890ABCDEFULL +
                      0x1EDCBA987654320FULL;
    int ndigits = print_u128_u(u128a);
    printf("\n%d digits\n", ndigits);
    ndigits = print_u128_u(u128b);
    printf("\n%d digits\n", ndigits);
    return(0);
}

The output from that is:

24197857200151252746022455506638221840
38 digits
321944928255972408260334335944939549199
39 digits

We can verify using bc:

$ bc
bc 1.06
Copyright 1991-1994, 1997, 1998, 2000 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY.
For details type `warranty'. 
ibase = 16
1234567890ABCDEFFEDCBA9876543210
24197857200151252746022455506638221840
F234567890ABCDEF1EDCBA987654320F
321944928255972408260334335944939549199
quit
$

Clearly, for hex, the process is simpler; you can shift and mask and print in just two operations. For octal, since 64 is not a multiple of 3, you have to go through analogous steps to the decimal operation.

The print_u128_u() interface is not ideal, but it does at least return the number of characters printed, just as printf() does. Adapting the code to format the result into a string buffer is a not wholly trivial exercise in programming, but not dreadfully difficult.

  • 1
    __uint128_t is just equivalent to unsigned __int128. – kennytm Jul 26 '12 at 14:26
  • 2
    @KennyTM: yes, I can see that, and know that, but there's nothing in the GCC documentation that says that (that I can see). – Jonathan Leffler Jul 26 '12 at 14:32
  • 8
    it seems __uint128_t and __int128_t are just legacy types which are now typedefed to unsigned __int128 and __int128 respectively. Because of that, GCC just don't mention it. gcc.gnu.org/ml/libstdc++/2011-09/msg00068.html – kennytm Jul 26 '12 at 15:01
  • 1
    @KennyTM: Thanks for the information. I've updated the 'working code' to use the preferred modern names instead of the obsolescent and undocumented alternatives, noting that older versions of GCC only support the obsolescent notation and not the new preferred documented notation. – Jonathan Leffler Jul 26 '12 at 16:21
5

I don't have a built-in solution, but division/modulus is expensive. You can convert binary to decimal with just shifts.

static char *qtoa(uint128_t n) {
    static char buf[40];
    unsigned int i, j, m = 39;
    memset(buf, 0, 40);
    for (i = 128; i-- > 0;) {
        int carry = !!(n & ((uint128_t)1 << i));
        for (j = 39; j-- > m + 1 || carry;) {
            int d = 2 * buf[j] + carry;
            carry = d > 9;
            buf[j] = carry ? d - 10 : d;
        }
        m = j;
    }
    for (i = 0; i < 38; i++) {
        if (buf[i]) {
            break;
        }
    }
    for (j = i; j < 39; j++) {
        buf[j] += '0';
    }
    return buf + i;
}

(But apparently 128-bit division/modulus are not as expensive as I thought. On a Phenom 9600 with GCC 4.7 and Clang 3.1 at -O2, this seems to run a 2x-3x slower than OP's method.)

  • 2
    This still requires modulus (j % 10), and is likely to be much more expensive than simple loop converting to decimal, largely because it requires 40*128 mod operations. You could get rid of the mod, but it would likely still be slower unless you also vectorize it do multiple digits in parallel. – Chris Dodd Jul 25 '12 at 22:28
  • 1
    @ChrisDodd I optimized the % away, but a benchmark on my machine shows that you're right -- this is slower after all, at least at 128 bits. It loses by less as the numbers grow larger, though... perhaps this technique is better for bignums. – ephemient Jul 26 '12 at 6:58
  • Or maybe I should try to use hardware BCD support? – ephemient Jul 26 '12 at 7:01
3

I think your print_uint128 function is awfully complex.

Isn't this one simpler to write and run?

void print_uint128(uint128_t n)
{
    if (n == 0) {
      return;
    }

    print_uint128(n/10);
    putchar(n%10+0x30);
}
  • 9
    print_uint128(0) prints "" rather than "0". Your thoughts? – chux Aug 5 '13 at 12:08
  • Worked like a charm!! – develCuy Nov 19 '16 at 21:50
  • 3
    putchar(n%10+'0'); is better. Not everyone knows what the magic number 0x30 is, and not everyone is using ASCII – phuclv Jan 14 '18 at 8:27
  • 1
    Calling putchar separately for each digit is much slower than storing at descending addresses in a loop. It would be less bad if you used putchar_unlocked. The compiler might turn your recursion back into a loop, though, so you might at least avoid the extra latency of storing/reloading n every iteration. (You're right that the OP's code is overcomplicated, especially indexing a string instead of using '0' + n%10.) – Peter Cordes May 16 '18 at 21:06
3

You can use this simple macro :

typedef __int128_t int128 ;
typedef __uint128_t uint128 ;

uint128  x = (uint128) 123;

printf("__int128 max  %016"PRIx64"%016"PRIx64"\n",(uint64)(x>>64),(uint64)x);
  • 3
    this is for printing hexadecimals, not decimals – phuclv May 30 '14 at 10:04
3

Based on sebastian's answer, this is for signed int128 in g++, not thread safe.

// g++ -Wall fact128.c && a.exe
// 35! overflows 128bits

#include <stdio.h>

char * sprintf_int128( __int128_t n ) {
    static char str[41] = { 0 };        // sign + log10(2**128) + '\0'
    char *s = str + sizeof( str ) - 1;  // start at the end
    bool neg = n < 0;
    if( neg )
        n = -n;
    do {
        *--s = "0123456789"[n % 10];    // save last digit
        n /= 10;                // drop it
    } while ( n );
    if( neg )
        *--s = '-';
    return s;
}

__int128_t factorial( __int128_t i ) {
    return i < 2 ? i : i * factorial( i - 1 );
}

int main(  ) {
    for( int i = 0; i < 35; i++ )
        printf( "fact(%d)=%s\n", i, sprintf_int128( factorial( i ) ) );
    return 0;
} 
1

Working off of abelenky's answer above, I came up with this.

void uint128_to_str_iter(uint128_t n, char *out,int firstiter){
    static int offset=0;
    if (firstiter){
        offset=0;
    }
    if (n == 0) {
      return;
    }
    uint128_to_str_iter(n/10,out,0);
    out[offset++]=n%10+0x30;
}

char* uint128_to_str(uint128_t n){
    char *out=calloc(sizeof(char),40);
    uint128_to_str_iter(n, out, 1);
    return out;
}

Which seems to work as intended.

0

Here's a modified version of Leffler's answer that supports from 0 to UINT128_MAX

/*      UINT64_MAX 18446744073709551615ULL */
#define P10_UINT64 10000000000000000000ULL /* 19 zeroes */
#define E10_UINT64 19

#define STRINGIZER(x) # x
#define TO_STRING(x) STRINGIZER(x)

int print_uint128_decimal(__uint128_t big) {
  size_t rc = 0;
  size_t i = 0;
  if (big >> 64) {
    char buf[40];
    while (big / P10_UINT64) {
      rc += sprintf(buf + E10_UINT64 * i, "%." TO_STRING(E10_UINT64) PRIu64, (uint64_t)(big % P10_UINT64));
      ++i;
      big /= P10_UINT64;
    }
    rc += printf("%" PRIu64, (uint64_t)big);
    while (i--) {
      fwrite(buf + E10_UINT64 * i, sizeof(char), E10_UINT64, stdout);
    }
  } else {
    rc += printf("%" PRIu64, (uint64_t)big);
  }
  return rc;
}

And try this:

print_uint128_decimal(-1); // Assuming -1's complement being 0xFFFFF...
0

C++ variant. You may use it as a template to derive specialized C-version of the function:

template< typename I >
void print_uint(I value)
{
    static_assert(std::is_unsigned< I >::value, "!");
    if (value == 0) {
        putchar_unlocked('0');
        return;
    }
    I rev = value;
    I count = 0;
    while ((rev % 10) == 0) {
        ++count;
        rev /= 10;
    }
    rev = 0;
    while (value != 0) {
        rev = (rev * 10) + (value % 10);
        value /= 10;
    }
    while (rev != 0) {
        putchar_unlocked('0' + (rev % 10));
        rev /= 10;
    }
    while (0 != count) {
        --count;
        putchar_unlocked('0');
    }
}
0

how to print __uint128_t number using gcc?
Is there PRIu128 that behaves similar to PRIu64 from :

No. Instead to print in decimal, print to a string.

The size of string buffer needed is just enough to do the job per the value of x.

typedef signed __int128 int128_t;
typedef unsigned __int128 uint128_t;

// Return pointer to the end
static char *uint128toa_helper(char *dest, uint128_t x) {
  if (x >= 10) {
    dest = uint128toa_helper(dest, x / 10);
  }
  *dest = (char) (x % 10 + '0');
  return ++dest;
}

char *int128toa(char *dest, int128_t x) {
  if (x < 0) {
    *dest = '-';
    *uint128toa_helper(dest + 1, (uint128_t) (-1 - x) + 1) = '\0';
  } else {
    *uint128toa_helper(dest, (uint128_t) x) = '\0';
  }
  return dest;
}

char *uint128toa(char *dest, uint128_t x) {
  *uint128toa_helper(dest, x) = '\0';
  return dest;
}

Test. Worst case buffer size: 41.

int main(void) {
  char buf[41];
  puts("1234567890123456789012345678901234567890");
  puts(uint128toa(buf, 0));
  puts(uint128toa(buf, 1));
  puts(uint128toa(buf, (uint128_t) -1));
  int128_t mx = ((uint128_t) -1) / 2;
  puts(int128toa(buf, -mx - 1));
  puts(int128toa(buf, -mx));
  puts(int128toa(buf, -1));
  puts(int128toa(buf, 0));
  puts(int128toa(buf, 1));
  puts(int128toa(buf, mx));
  return 0;
}

Output

1234567890123456789012345678901234567890
0
1
340282366920938463463374607431768211455
-170141183460469231731687303715884105728
-170141183460469231731687303715884105727
-1
0
1
170141183460469231731687303715884105727
  • If you need the result at the start of a buffer, the most efficient way is probably to start from the end of a local fixed-size buffer (automatic storage), then memcpy the result into the caller's buffer. That's more efficient than using actual recursion to not store anything until you're returning up the stack. Another optimization would be to use uint64_t as soon as your number fits, so (at least on 64-bit targets) you'll probably get n%10 and n/=10 using a multiplicative inverse instead of calling a helper function for double-width division. – Peter Cordes May 16 '18 at 21:16
  • @PeterCordes True - about recursion vs local buffer. How about using a compound literal for buffer space as How to use compound literals to fprintf() multiple formatted numbers with arbitrary bases?? – chux May 16 '18 at 21:24
  • Yup, you could do that as the source arg for memcpy or fputs or whatever to wrap it up all on one line. – Peter Cordes May 16 '18 at 21:30
-2

much like #3

unsigned __int128 g = ...........;

printf ("g = 0x%lx%lx\r\n", (uint64_t) (g >> 64), (uint64_t) g);
  • 2
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. – Clijsters Dec 13 '17 at 15:47
  • 2
    It's no different from Jens Gustedt's answer, and is worse. %lx is not the correct way to print uint64_t, PRIX64 is the one to use – phuclv Jan 14 '18 at 8:12
  • it's almost the same as user2107435's answer, too – phuclv Jan 14 '18 at 8:32

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