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I am looking to make some code easier to read by taking something like this:

0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44 ....

and adding new lines to create increments of 8:

0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44,
0x44, 0x44 ....

Anyone know any vim magic that will allow me to do this with specifically selected lines?

5 Answers 5

5

This is not the prettiest solution and I am sure that it can be cleaned up / simplified some. First select the text and then enter this command:

:'<,'>s/\(\S\+,\s*\)\{8}/&\r/g

This outputs something like this:

0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44,
0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44,
0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, ...
5
  • One can also use a line range rather than a visual selection: :,+5s.... Also, no need to escape the } in the quantifier: \{8}.
    – pb2q
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 20:18
  • I cannot vouch for vim as I am at work, but in vi the {8} has to have the brackets escaped.
    – zanegray
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 20:22
  • vi requires escaping both braces? I don't have a real vi to test against. The above pattern, using \{8} works in vim after set compatible, but that's no proof. Also, :help /\{ asserts that {Vi does not have any of these}, re: quantifiers. That doesn't seem right, but it's been some time since I had a real vi in front of me
    – pb2q
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 20:29
  • In vim, the closing } doesn't have to be escaped, but there's no harm at all in escaping it.
    – mwcz
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 20:29
  • I stand corrected. vi does not require to escape the closing brace. Sorry for the confusion.
    – zanegray
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 22:28
1

One way to cheat would be:

  1. set textwidth=48
  2. highlight (in visual mode) the lines you want to wrap
  3. gq

That will work just fine, so long as the textwidth is roughly where you want to wrap. If all the items in the list are the same width, this method should be flawless.

Another, slightly more robust way, would be to define a macro.

  1. move your cursor to the beginning of the line
  2. qw to begin recording a macro in register w (you can use any register)
  3. 8f,a press enter, leave Insert mode, and press q again
  4. @w to replay the macro as many times as you need. I'm sure there's a clever way to automate how many times to replay the macro, but I'm not sure how. You can also press @@ to run the most recently run macro.

A regular expression also works, as @zanegray posted.

1
  • The official Vim name for a key macro is "recording". help q
    – fork0
    Commented Jul 25, 2012 at 20:17
1

This will not win any vim golf contests, but I like to think about problems like this in simple steps.

  1. Put each element on its own line.
  2. Join 8 line together at a time
  3. Do any necessary clean up by hand

To do this run the following:

:s/, /,\r/g
:'[,']g/./j 8

Explanation:

  • :s/, /,\r/g substitute all spaces after the comma with a return (\r)
  • '[,'] is the range of the recently modified text.
  • g/./{cmd} will execute a command, {cmd}, on all line that match . (any non blank line)
  • j 8 is short for join 8 which mean join 8 lines

Now a word of warning: This will join 8 lines even after it exceeds the end of the substituted text, ']. This could be overcome w/ a more complex command like: :'[,']g/./.,+6/,$/j 8, but that is not simple enough for my tastes. If this issue is a real concern I would move the original text to a new buffer (via :new) or at the very least the bottom of the current buffer. After completing the transformation move it back into place.

For more information

:h range
:h :j
:h :s
:h :g
:h '[
0

You could do this with a multi-part command that might be easier to wrap your head around...

Make a macro that adds a semi-colon after the 8th comma.

qq8f,lr;qu

Select the text and then execute that macro 1000 times (or more if there's more than 8000 per line)

:'<,'>norm 1000@q

Reselect the area with gv and substitute all semi-colons with line breaks.

gv
:'<,'>s/;/\r/g

This will add a semi-colon after the 8th comma and then subtitute that semi-colon with a line-break.

0

So this solution is based off of Zanegray's solution and some small tweaking on my part:

:s/\(\w\+,\s\)\{8}/&\r/g

Zanegray's solution would have also worked like:

:s/\(\S\+\s\)/&\r/g

since the negation of spaces \S would have included the ,.

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