22

My table has two keys, one is an auto incrementing id (PRIMARY), the other is the name of the item (UNIQUE).

Is it possible to duplicate a row within this same table? I have tried:

INSERT INTO items
SELECT * FROM items WHERE id = '9198'

This gives the error Duplicate entry '9198' for key 'PRIMARY'

I have also tried:

INSERT INTO items
SELECT * FROM items WHERE id = '9198'
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE id=id+1

Which gives the error Column 'id' in field list is ambiguous

And as far as the item name (UNIQUE) field goes, is there a way to append (Copy) to the item name, since this field must also be unique?

5
  • 1
    Try selecting all rows except the id, assuming your id is auto increment, it will update automatically. – databyss Jul 26 '12 at 1:04
  • @databyss That would work, but I'm looking for an alternate method, as this table has a couple hundred columns. – Norse Jul 26 '12 at 1:05
  • Copy and paste the column names. – databyss Jul 26 '12 at 1:06
  • a couple hundred columns? It must be like hell to manage so many columns in a single table! – Jocelyn Jul 26 '12 at 1:06
  • 1
    you CAN query the column names using "SELECT GROUP_CONCAT(column_name) FROM information_schema.columns WHERE table_name = 'items' and column_name <> 'id'" – databyss Jul 26 '12 at 1:13

12 Answers 12

48

Select all columns explicitly, except the id column:

INSERT INTO items
(col1, col2, ..., coln)
SELECT col1, col2, ..., coln
FROM items
WHERE id = '9198'

Your next question will probably be:

Is there a way to do this without listing all the columns explicitly?

Answer: No, I don't think so.

2
  • See @Mark's answer for a way to do this without listing the columns explicitly. – Michael LB Jan 21 '16 at 14:24
  • It's really annoying in all the great things that MySQL does that this isn't somehow a built in feature. Limit it to PrimaryKey, auto-increment setups if they have to, but still. You wouldn't think something like INSERT INTO table SELECT * FROM table WHERE primaryid = 'x' coulnd't be auto-recognized as strip the PrimaryKey field but copy everything else. Ohh well, MySQL is still amazing so is what it is I suppose. – Andy Borgmann Apr 16 '20 at 17:01
28

If you really don't want to list all the table columns like in Mark's answer, you can try this:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp_tbl SELECT * FROM items WHERE id = '9198';
SELECT @maxId := MAX(id) + 1 FROM items;
UPDATE temp_tbl SET id = @maxId;
INSERT INTO items SELECT * FROM temp_tbl;
DROP TABLE temp_tbl;

Not beautiful, not fast. But works.

3
  • This example worked for me. I just made sure that when I used it with multiple users, that I added an extra part to the temp_tbl, so it was unique for that user. I also added the following line: UPDATE temp_tbl SET field_that_needs_to_use_a_title = CONCAT('DUPLICATE ',field_that_needs_to_use_a_title) WHERE id = '9198'; – vr_driver Oct 19 '13 at 4:43
  • this wouldn't work always - e.g. if id being cloned is not the largest id in the original table? – Elendurwen Mar 21 '19 at 11:01
  • @Elendurwen Indeed. Edited to make it work in this situation. – Phius Mar 21 '19 at 15:16
5

Thanks to hobailey for providing a great maintenance-free solution.

Here is the code I ended up using, which is updated for MySQLi:

// Get the columns
$cols = array();
$result = $mysqli->query("SHOW COLUMNS FROM [TABLE]"); // Change table name

while ($r = $result->fetch_array(MYSQLI_ASSOC)) {
    if (!in_array($r["Field"], array("COLA", "COL4", "COL8"))) { // Edit array with any column names you want to exclude
        $cols[] = $r["Field"];
    }
}

// Build and do the insert
$result = $mysqli->query("SELECT * FROM [TABLE] WHERE [SELECTION CRITERIA];"); // Change table name and add selection criteria

while ($r = $result->fetch_array(MYSQLI_ASSOC)) {

    $insertSQL = "INSERT INTO [TABLE] (" . implode(", ",$cols) . ") VALUES ("; // Change table name
    $count = count($cols);

    foreach($cols as $counter=>$col) {
// This is where you can add any code to change the value of existing columns
        $insertSQL .= "'" . $mysqli->real_escape_string($r[$col]) . "'";
        if ($counter < ($count - 1)) {
            $insertSQL .= ", ";
        }
    } // END foreach

    $insertSQL .= ");";

    $mysqli->query($insertSQL);
    if ($mysqli->affected_rows < 1) {
// Add code if the insert fails
    } else {
// Add code if the insert is successful
    }

} // END while
2
  • Not pretty but does the job! Is the line $mysqli->real_escape_string($r[$col]) necessary considering the values are already in the database? – Michael LB Jan 21 '16 at 14:22
  • 1
    Yes escape is needed - try it with quotes in the text - or use PDO /bound params – anoldermark Feb 28 '17 at 11:30
4

Alternatively, if you don't want to write all the columns explicitly (and don't want to start creating/dropping tables), you can just get the columns of the table and build the query automagically:

//get the columns
$cols=array();
$result = mysql_query("SHOW COLUMNS FROM [table]"); 
 while ($r=mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) {
  if (!in_array($r["Field"],array("[unique key]"))) {//add other columns here to want to exclude from the insert
   $cols[]= $r["Field"];
  } //if
}//while

//build and do the insert       
$result = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM [table] WHERE [queries against want to duplicate]");
  while($r=mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
    $insertSQL = "INSERT INTO [table] (".implode(", ",$cols).") VALUES (";
    $count=count($cols);
    foreach($cols as $counter=>$col) {
      $insertSQL .= "'".$r[$col]."'";
  if ($counter<$count-1) {$insertSQL .= ", ";}//dont want a , on the last one
    }//foreach
  $insertSQL .= ")";

  mysql_query($insertSQL);//execute the query
  }//while

Note that this uses the depreciated code of MySQL and it should be MySQLi. I'm sure it could also be improved, but it's what I'm using and it works very well.

2

The question title does state you want to do this from PHP.

I've encountered the same problem and writing out all the column names is tedious and hard to maintain if you change your table structure (add/remove columns)... and I don't like the solutions that use temp tables.

I've elected to solve this problem with two queries sent from PHP - works great and no maintenance required (disclaimer: I use the meekrodb library for database access):

//get the data as an associative array
$row = DB::queryFirstRow("SELECT * FROM your_table WHERE id=%i",$id);
if ($row){
    unset($row["id"]); //unset the primary key
    DB::insert("your_table",$row);
    return DB::insertId();
} else {
    return false;
}

You can even perform more manipulations on the internal data (unset other columns to ignore, edit values, etc) before re-inserting.

2

Another solution in PHP for copy a row in the same table without a specific column(s) / e.g. primary key - and without "TEMPORARY TABLE" and "SHOW COLUMNS FROM..."-method:

$stmt = $db->prepare("select * from table where id = :id;");
$stmt->bindValue(':id', $_GET['id'], PDO::PARAM_INT);
$stmt->execute();
$row = $stmt->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
unset($row['id']);      //remove primary key

$columns = array_keys($row);
$query = "insert into table (`".implode('`, `', $columns)."`) select `".implode('`, `', $columns)."` from  data_ticket_serie where id = ".$_GET['id'].";";
// echo $query;
$stmt = $db->prepare($query);
$stmt->execute();

The INSERT is a SELECT-statement, so the values are not direct in the statement --> no problems with "real_escape_string" or something like that.

1
  • Yes this is really neat :) – Ramon Fincken Apr 12 '18 at 9:08
1

For tables with many columns, I use a (yes, slow) method similar to Phius idea.
I put it here just for completeness.

Let's assume, table 'tbl' has an 'id' defined like

id INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY

Then you can clone/copy a row by following these steps:

  1. create a tmp table

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tbl_tmp LIKE tbl;

  1. Insert one or more entries you want to clone / copy

INSERT INTO tbl_tmp SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE ...;

  1. remove the AUTOINCREMENT tag from 'id'

ALTER TABLE tbl_tmp MODIFY id INT;

  1. drop the primary index

ALTER TABLE tbl_tmp DROP PRIMARY KEY;

  1. update your unique indices and set 'id' to 0 (0 needed for step 6. to work)

UPDATE tbl_tmp SET unique_value=?,id=0;

  1. copy your modified rows into 'tbl' with 'id' being autogenerated.

INSERT INTO tbl SELECT * FROM tbl_tmp;

  1. cleanup (or just close the DB connection)

DROP TABLE tbl_tmp;

If you also need clone/copy some dependant data in other tables, do the above for each row. After step 6 you can get the last inserted key and use this to clone/copy the dependant rows within other tables using the same procedure.

1

I am surprised anyone didn't mention using phpMyAdmin to create the query. Because this would make it fast to add all the columns and then you just set the id to null or o as mentioned above by wlf.

This is by far the simplest way to do it

INSERT INTO users SELECT 0,email,user FROM users WHERE id=10
1

I had to do something similar recently so I thought I post my solution for any size table, example included. It just take a configuration array which can be adjusted to practically any size table.

$copy_table_row = array(
    'table'=>'purchase_orders',     //table name
    'primary'=>'purchaseOrderID',   //primary key (or whatever column you're lookin up with index)
    'index'=>4084,                  //primary key index number
    'fields' => array(
        'siteID',             //copy colunm
        ['supplierID'=>21],   //overwrite this column to arbirary value by wrapping it in an array
        'status',             //copy colunm
        ['notes'=>'copied'],  //changes to "copied"
        'dateCreated',        //copy colunm
        'approved',           //copy colunm
    ),
);
echo copy_table_row($copy_table_row);



function copy_table_row($cfg){
    $d=[];
    foreach($cfg['fields'] as $i => $f){
        if(is_array($f)){
            $d['insert'][$i] = "`".current(array_keys($f))."`";
            $d['select'][$i] = "'".current($f)."'";
        }else{
            $d['insert'][$i] = "`".$f."`";
            $d['select'][$i] = "`".$f."`";
        }
    }
    $sql = "INSERT INTO `".$cfg['table']."` (".implode(', ',$d['insert']).")
        SELECT ".implode(',',$d['select'])."
        FROM `".$cfg['table']."`
        WHERE `".$cfg['primary']."` = '".$cfg['index']."';";
    return $sql;
}

This will output something like:

INSERT INTO `purchase_orders` (`siteID`, `supplierID`, `status`, `notes`, `dateCreated`, `approved`)
SELECT `siteID`,'21',`status`,'copied',`dateCreated`,`approved`
FROM `purchase_orders`
WHERE `purchaseOrderID` = '4084';
0

Say the table is user(id,email,user) and because you have a WHERE clause you can't use MAX(id)+1:

INSERT INTO users SELECT 0,email,user FROM users WHERE id=10

Bear in mind though that you should always specify the column names when using INSERT.

0

I wanted to copy a row in my events table and found Mark's solution very helpful. I made it a bit shorter.

public static function getColumnsOfTable($table,  $arr_exclude_cols=array()) {
    global $obj_db;

    $cols = array();
    $result = $obj_db->query("SHOW COLUMNS FROM `".$table."`");

    while ($r = $result->fetch_array(MYSQLI_ASSOC)) {
        if (!in_array($r["Field"], $arr_exclude_cols)) { 
            $cols[] = $r["Field"];
        }
    }

    return $cols;
}

and the code for copying:

$cols = Utils::getColumnsOfTable('events', array('event_id'));

    $result1 = $obj_db->query('SELECT * FROM `events` WHERE `event_id` = '.$event_id);
    $arr_event = mysqli_fetch_array($result1, MYSQLI_NUM);
    unset($arr_event[0]);

    $insertSQL =  'INSERT INTO `events` (`' . implode('`, `',$cols) . '`) VALUES ("'. implode('","', $arr_event).'")'; 
0

This is a general function to copy an record of any table:

/**
 * @param string $table         Name of table
 * @param array $primaryKey     Which record should be copied? array('nameOfColumnWithUniqueId' => "value")
 * @param array $excludeFields  Which columns should not be copied (e.q. Unique Cols)
 * @param string $database      Name of database
 * @return int                  ID of new inserted record
 */
function copyMysqlRow($table, $primaryKey, $excludeFields = array(), $database = "usr_web3_2")
{
    $field = key($primaryKey);
    $value = current($primaryKey);
    $sql = "
        SELECT
            *
        FROM
            $database.$table
        WHERE
          $field = '$value'
    ";

    $result = mysql_query($sql);
    $row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result);

    $cols = array();
    $values = array();
    foreach ($row AS $col=>$value) {
        if (!in_array($col, $excludeFields)) {
            $cols[] = "`" . $col . "`";
            $values[] = $value === null ? 'null' : "'" . $value . "'";
        }
    }

    $sql = sprintf(" INSERT INTO $database.$table (%s) VALUES  (%s) ", implode($cols, ','), implode($values, ','));

    mysql_query($sql);

    return mysql_insert_id();
}
2
  • The implodes are the wrong way round! - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - It should be : $sql = sprintf(" INSERT INTO $table (%s) VALUES (%s) ", implode(', ',$cols), implode(', ',$values)); - - - - - - Otherwise it's a good solution – anoldermark May 3 '17 at 17:17
  • can't remove this secondary comment - I need line breaks above – anoldermark May 3 '17 at 17:26

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