147

I have 2,299.00 as a string and I am trying to parse it to a number. I tried using parseFloat, which results in 2. I guess the comma is the problem, but how would I solve this issue the right way? Just remove the comma?

var x = parseFloat("2,299.00")
console.log(x);

0

16 Answers 16

170

Yes remove the commas:

let output = parseFloat("2,299.00".replace(/,/g, ''));
console.log(output);

6
  • 7
    Yeah, but now the decimal places are lost. 2300.00 results in 2300 for example. Jul 26, 2012 at 9:18
  • 1
    @user1540714 thats because its a float rather than a string. If you then need to output it you need to format it to always show 2 decimal points.
    – Jon Taylor
    Jul 26, 2012 at 9:19
  • Can that be avoided? Ill try toFixed Jul 26, 2012 at 9:19
  • 2
    In french locale, a comma is a decimal separator... So this fails for a very likely scenario that a browser has set french locale Sep 27, 2017 at 12:51
  • If you are getting the original figure from a database, json encoded data or other data source as a string, am I right in thinking it won't affected by browser locale until it's converted to a number? This would mean you can carry out string operations as suggested above to remove commas, although if you then use parseFloat() on the string it would depend on locale. One way round the locale issues could be to split the number on the decimal point and output as (part1 + part2/100).toFixed(2)
    – Jon
    Mar 1, 2018 at 12:21
165

Removing commas is potentially dangerous because, as others have mentioned in the comments, many locales use a comma to mean something different (like a decimal place).

I don't know where you got your string from, but in some places in the world "2,299.00" = 2.299

The Intl object could have been a nice way to tackle this problem, but somehow they managed to ship the spec with only a Intl.NumberFormat.format() API and no parse counterpart :(

The only way to parse a string with cultural numeric characters in it to a machine recognisable number in any i18n sane way is to use a library that leverages CLDR data to cover off all possible ways of formatting number strings http://cldr.unicode.org/

The two best JS options I've come across for this so far:

7
  • 6
    Can't beleive no one upvoted this answer yet, it's the only actual answer on this page!
    – evilkos
    Aug 8, 2017 at 17:56
  • 14
    Completely agree that Intl should've had a parsing counterpart. It seems obvious that people would need this. Dec 11, 2017 at 11:54
  • 1
    This is the only systematic way to do this. Can't achieve this with one regex fits-all approach. Commas and periods have different meanings in different languages.
    – Wildhammer
    Jun 11, 2020 at 19:44
  • Actually, nowhere in the world would "2,299.00" == 2.299. Any sane human would look at that number and assume it is 2299 formatted to two decimals in a format that uses commas for grouping and periods/full stops for decimals. Unless you're telling me there's a place where they group decimal fractions using periods and stop after 1 2/3 groups? I call BS. In any case, you can use the formatting rules exposed by Intl.NumberFormat to build a parser: see the answers to Is there any JavaScript standard API to parse to number according to locale? May 8 at 23:39
  • @HereticMonkey gl locale appears to work as i explained according to my tests with cldr definitions - github.com/thedavidmeister/cljs-i18n/blob/master/src/i18n/… May 12 at 11:22
56

On modern browsers you can use the built in Intl.NumberFormat to detect the browser's number formatting and normalize the input to match.

function parseNumber(value, locales = navigator.languages) {
  const example = Intl.NumberFormat(locales).format('1.1');
  const cleanPattern = new RegExp(`[^-+0-9${ example.charAt( 1 ) }]`, 'g');
  const cleaned = value.replace(cleanPattern, '');
  const normalized = cleaned.replace(example.charAt(1), '.');

  return parseFloat(normalized);
}

const corpus = {
  '1.123': {
    expected: 1.123,
    locale: 'en-US'
  },
  '1,123': {
    expected: 1123,
    locale: 'en-US'
  },
  '2.123': {
    expected: 2123,
    locale: 'fr-FR'
  },
  '2,123': {
    expected: 2.123,
    locale: 'fr-FR'
  },
}


for (const candidate in corpus) {
  const {
    locale,
    expected
  } = corpus[candidate];
  const parsed = parseNumber(candidate, locale);

  console.log(`${ candidate } in ${ corpus[ candidate ].locale } == ${ expected }? ${ parsed === expected }`);
}

Their's obviously room for some optimization and caching but this works reliably in all languages.

10
  • Why has this not got a load of upvotes!!! It is the most elegant solution to INPUT in international formats! Thank you!!
    – kpollock
    Aug 23, 2017 at 14:39
  • in France currency is 231 123 413,12
    – stackdave
    Nov 29, 2017 at 19:16
  • If you need support for IE11, replace 3rd line to: const cleanPattern = new RegExp("[^-+0-9" + example.charAt( 1 ) + "]", 'g'); - template strings "`" are not supported by IE - caniuse.com/#search=template%20string
    – long
    Sep 4, 2020 at 14:10
  • Isn't it better to pass navigator.languages instead of navigator.language to the constructor? I'm wondering because in the book "Modern JavaScript for the impatient" p.180, it suggests using that one. Not sure what the difference is though Oct 8, 2020 at 3:23
  • 1
    @KoheiNozaki I took another look at Locale negotiation and it seems you're on to something. The browser should negotiate the preferred locale if you pass all of them in so it shouldn't hurt and could be better to pass them all in. Oct 15, 2020 at 2:12
26

Remove anything that isn't a digit, decimal point, or minus sign (-):

var str = "2,299.00";
str = str.replace(/[^\d\.\-]/g, ""); // You might also include + if you want them to be able to type it
var num = parseFloat(str);

Updated fiddle

Note that it won't work for numbers in scientific notation. If you want it to, change the replace line to add e, E, and + to the list of acceptable characters:

str = str.replace(/[^\d\.\-eE+]/g, "");
7
  • 4
    This won't work for negative numbers or numbers in scientific notation. Jul 26, 2012 at 9:09
  • 1
    str = str.replace(/(\d+),(?=\d{3}(\D|$))/g, "$1"); This is what I would use but I'm utterly useless at regex and is something I found a while back on some other SO thread.
    – Jon Taylor
    Jul 26, 2012 at 9:13
  • @JonTaylor: The goal here wasn't to validate the number, just to make it work for parseFloat -- which will validate it. :-) Jul 26, 2012 at 9:14
  • which mine does do, as far as I know. I use this to convert 1,234,567 etc to 1234567. As I said though I'm utterly useless at regex so I couldn't for the life of me tell you what it actually does lol.
    – Jon Taylor
    Jul 26, 2012 at 9:16
  • 1
    bad idea to remove "-" minus sign - obtain completly other number, and also if you parse heterogenous formats, "7.500" !== "7,500"
    – serge
    Apr 10, 2020 at 19:12
18

Usually you should consider to use input fields which don't allow free text input for numeric values. But there might be cases, when you need to guess the input format. For example 1.234,56 in Germany means 1,234.56 in US. See https://salesforce.stackexchange.com/a/21404 for a list of countries which use comma as decimal.

I use the following function to do a best guess and strip off all non-numeric characters:

function parseNumber(strg) {
    var strg = strg || "";
    var decimal = '.';
    strg = strg.replace(/[^0-9$.,]/g, '');
    if(strg.indexOf(',') > strg.indexOf('.')) decimal = ',';
    if((strg.match(new RegExp("\\" + decimal,"g")) || []).length > 1) decimal="";
    if (decimal != "" && (strg.length - strg.indexOf(decimal) - 1 == 3) && strg.indexOf("0" + decimal)!==0) decimal = "";
    strg = strg.replace(new RegExp("[^0-9$" + decimal + "]","g"), "");
    strg = strg.replace(',', '.');
    return parseFloat(strg);
}   

Try it here: https://plnkr.co/edit/9p5Y6H?p=preview

Examples:

1.234,56 € => 1234.56
1,234.56USD => 1234.56
1,234,567€ => 1234567
1.234.567 => 1234567
1,234.567 => 1234.567
1.234 => 1234 // might be wrong - best guess
1,234 => 1234 // might be wrong - best guess
1.2345 => 1.2345
0,123 => 0.123

The function has one weak point: It is not possible to guess the format if you have 1,123 or 1.123 - because depending on the locale format both might be a comma or a thousands-separator. In this special case the function will treat separator as a thousands-separator and return 1123.

6
  • It fails for numbers like 1,111.11, which is obviously english format, but returns 111111 Apr 20, 2017 at 18:16
  • Thank you, Mr. Goferito - I am sorry - I fixed the function.
    – ESP32
    Apr 21, 2017 at 19:47
  • Looks like this may also fail for very small numbers "0,124" in french locale for example. Jul 23, 2017 at 4:52
  • Wou, great! This is almost exactly, what I was looking for: 3,00 € also is replaced to 3.00. Just a note, that 3,001 is formatted to 3001. To avoid this, input should always be with decimal symbols. E.g. 3,001.00€ 3,001.00 converts correctly. Also, please, update jsfiddle. 0,124 there is still converted to 124 Oct 19, 2017 at 15:45
  • well done buddy I think its worth to be the correct answer
    – Waheed
    Nov 1, 2017 at 21:55
5

It's baffling that they included a toLocaleString but not a parse method. At least toLocaleString without arguments is well supported in IE6+.

For a i18n solution, I came up with this:

First detect the user's locale decimal separator:

var decimalSeparator = 1.1;
decimalSeparator = decimalSeparator.toLocaleString().substring(1, 2);

Then normalize the number if there's more than one decimal separator in the String:

var pattern = "([" + decimalSeparator + "])(?=.*\\1)";separator
var formatted = valor.replace(new RegExp(pattern, "g"), "");

Finally, remove anything that is not a number or a decimal separator:

formatted = formatted.replace(new RegExp("[^0-9" + decimalSeparator + "]", "g"), '');
return Number(formatted.replace(decimalSeparator, "."));
3

If you want to avoid the problem that David Meister posted and you are sure about the number of decimal places, you can replace all dots and commas and divide by 100, ex.:

var value = "2,299.00";
var amount = parseFloat(value.replace(/"|\,|\./g, ''))/100;

or if you have 3 decimals

var value = "2,299.001";
var amount = parseFloat(value.replace(/"|\,|\./g, ''))/1000;

It's up to you if you want to use parseInt, parseFloat or Number. Also If you want to keep the number of decimal places you can use the function .toFixed(...).

3

or try this shorter approach:

const myNum =  +('2,299.00'.replace(",",""));

If you have several commas use Regex:

const myNum =  +('2,022,233,988.55'.replace(/,/g,""));
// -> myNum = 2022233988.55

Here was my case in an array (for similar use case):

To get the sum of this array:

const numbers = ["11", "7", "15/25", "18/5", "12", "16/25"]

By using parseFloat I would lose the decimals so to get the exact sum I had to first replace the forward slash with dot, then convert the strings to actual numbers.

So:

const currectNumbers = numbers.map(num => +(num.replace("/",".")))

// or the longer approach:
const currectNumbers = numbers
.map(num => num.replace("/","."))
.map(num => parseFloat(num));

This will give me the desired array to be used in reduce method:

currectNumbers = [ 11, 7, 15.25, 18.5, 12, 16.25]
2

All of these answers fail if you have a number in the millions.

3,456,789 would simply return 3456 with the replace method.

The most correct answer for simply removing the commas would have to be.

var number = '3,456,789.12';
number.split(',').join('');
/* number now equips 3456789.12 */
parseFloat(number);

Or simply written.

number = parseFloat(number.split(',').join(''));
2
  • Of course, American's use comma and not dot. It would be foolish to try to make a monstrosity to attempt to handle both.
    – Case
    May 23, 2017 at 18:45
  • 3
    but such a "monstrosity" already exists as part of what Unicode provides (see my answer). I'm sure you would feel less foolish about this if you ran a company with international customers. May 25, 2017 at 3:40
2

This converts a number in whatever locale to normal number. Works for decimals points too:

function numberFromLocaleString(stringValue, locale){
    var parts = Number(1111.11).toLocaleString(locale).replace(/\d+/g,'').split('');
    if (stringValue === null)
        return null;
    if (parts.length==1) {
        parts.unshift('');
    }   
    return Number(String(stringValue).replace(new RegExp(parts[0].replace(/\s/g,' '),'g'), '').replace(parts[1],"."));
}
//Use default browser locale
numberFromLocaleString("1,223,333.567") //1223333.567

//Use specific locale
numberFromLocaleString("1 223 333,567", "ru") //1223333.567
2
Number("2,299.00".split(',').join(''));   // 2299

The split function splits the string into an array using "," as a separator and returns an array.
The join function joins the elements of the array returned from the split function.
The Number() function converts the joined string to a number.

1
  • Please elaborate a bit more on what is the solution and how does it solves the problem.
    – Tariq
    Jun 8, 2020 at 10:15
1
const parseLocaleNumber = strNum => {
    const decSep = (1.1).toLocaleString().substring(1, 2);
    const formatted = strNum
        .replace(new RegExp(`([${decSep}])(?=.*\\1)`, 'g'), '')
        .replace(new RegExp(`[^0-9${decSep}]`, 'g'), '');
    return Number(formatted.replace(decSep, '.'));
};
1

With this function you will be able to format values in multiple formats like 1.234,56 and 1,234.56, and even with errors like 1.234.56 and 1,234,56

/**
 * @param {string} value: value to convert
 * @param {bool} coerce: force float return or NaN
 */
function parseFloatFromString(value, coerce) {
    value = String(value).trim();

    if ('' === value) {
        return value;
    }

    // check if the string can be converted to float as-is
    var parsed = parseFloat(value);
    if (String(parsed) === value) {
        return fixDecimals(parsed, 2);
    }

    // replace arabic numbers by latin
    value = value
    // arabic
    .replace(/[\u0660-\u0669]/g, function(d) {
        return d.charCodeAt(0) - 1632;
    })

    // persian
    .replace(/[\u06F0-\u06F9]/g, function(d) {
        return d.charCodeAt(0) - 1776;
    });

    // remove all non-digit characters
    var split = value.split(/[^\dE-]+/);

    if (1 === split.length) {
        // there's no decimal part
        return fixDecimals(parseFloat(value), 2);
    }

    for (var i = 0; i < split.length; i++) {
        if ('' === split[i]) {
            return coerce ? fixDecimals(parseFloat(0), 2) : NaN;
        }
    }

    // use the last part as decimal
    var decimal = split.pop();

    // reconstruct the number using dot as decimal separator
    return fixDecimals(parseFloat(split.join('') +  '.' + decimal), 2);
}

function fixDecimals(num, precision) {
    return (Math.floor(num * 100) / 100).toFixed(precision);
}
parseFloatFromString('1.234,56')
"1234.56"
parseFloatFromString('1,234.56')
"1234.56"
parseFloatFromString('1.234.56')
"1234.56"
parseFloatFromString('1,234,56')
"1234.56"
0
0

If you want a l10n answer do it this way. Example uses currency, but you don't need that. Intl library will need to be polyfilled if you have to support older browsers.

var value = "2,299.00";
var currencyId = "USD";
var nf = new Intl.NumberFormat(undefined, {style:'currency', currency: currencyId, minimumFractionDigits: 2});

value = nf.format(value.replace(/,/g, ""));
5
  • 9
    this is not really l10n answer, because for some locales (e.g. DE) the comma is the decimal point.
    – Andreas
    Jun 24, 2016 at 11:42
  • And also replace() only replaces first match when not using RegExp with 'g' flag.
    – binki
    Jan 9, 2017 at 20:12
  • @binki Thanks. Fixed. Jul 12, 2017 at 23:23
  • @Andreas This is the l10n answer. If you wanted another currency you'd just change the value of currencyId to that countries currencyId. Jul 12, 2017 at 23:31
  • 1
    @TonyTopper this doesn't change the fact that the replace for the thousands separator is hardcoded to , which is in comma seperator in some locales
    – Andreas
    Jul 14, 2017 at 7:40
0

If you have a small set of locales to support you'd probably be better off by just hardcoding a couple of simple rules:

function parseNumber(str, locale) {
  let radix = ',';
  if (locale.match(/(en|th)([-_].+)?/)) {
    radix = '.';
  }
  return Number(str
    .replace(new RegExp('[^\\d\\' + radix + ']', 'g'), '')
    .replace(radix, '.'));
}
0

Based on many great architects here, I've simplified it a bit.

I prefer to use Intl.NumberFormat(undefined) to make it use the best fit mechanism.

If the user, like me, has a Danish keyboard, but prefer the Mac to be english, this helps: if (Number.isNaN(normalized)) return Number(value.replace(',', '.'));

If this is used in a form, I found that I should use inputMode="numeric" rather than type="number".

function parseNumber(value, locales = undefined) {
  if (typeof value !== 'string') return value;
  const example = Intl.NumberFormat(locales).format('1.1');
  const normalized = Number(value.replace(example.charAt(1), '.'));
  if (Number.isNaN(normalized)) return Number(value.replace(',', '.'));
  return normalized;
}

/* test */

const tests = [
  {
    locale: 'en-US',
    candidate: 1.123,
    expected: 1.123,
  },
  {
    locale: 'en-US',
    candidate: '1.123',
    expected: 1.123,
  },
  {
    locale: 'fr-FR',
    candidate: '33.123',
    expected: 33.123,
  },
  {
    locale: 'fr-FR',
    candidate: '33,123',
    expected: 33.123,
  },
  {
    locale: 'da-DK',
    candidate: '45.123',
    expected: 45.123,
  },
  {
    locale: 'da-DK',
    candidate: '45,123',
    expected: 45.123,
  },
  {
    locale: 'en-US',
    candidate: '0.123',
    expected: 0.123,
  },
  {
    locale: undefined,
    candidate: '0,123',
    expected: 0.123,
  },
];

tests.forEach(({ locale, candidate, expected }) => {
  const parsed = parseNumber(candidate, locale);
  console.log(`${candidate} as ${typeof candidate} in ${locale}: ${parsed} === ${expected}? ${parsed === expected}`);
});

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