20

I have the following SVG graphic:

<svg version="1.1" id="diagram" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" x="0px" y="0px" width="375px" height="150px">
    <path d="M45,11.5H33.333c0.735-1.159,1.167-2.528,1.167-4C34.5,3.364,31.136,0,27,0s-7.5,3.364-7.5,7.5c0,1.472,0.432,2.841,1.167,4H9l-9,32h54L45,11.5z M22.5,7.5C22.5,5.019,24.519,3,27,3s4.5,2.019,4.5,4.5c0,1.752-1.017,3.257-2.481,4h-4.037 C23.517,10.757,22.5,9.252,22.5,7.5z" id="control"/>
</svg>

I want to programmatically change the scale of this object, but I want it to scale from the a center point.

I've tried wrapping it around a <g> tag, like so

<g transform="translate(0,0)">
<path x="0" y="0" id="control" transform="scale(2)">...</path>
</g>

But this doesn't seem to work. I've been looking online and it seems that scaling a path requires manipulation of the paths matrix, which seems horrifically difficult. Annoyingly, its easy to scale using additive="sum" property but in this instance I am not using a transform animation.

Can anyone help me out?

Edit: Managed to get this working nicely, for anyone who is stuck on the same thing, here is a nice way of doing it programmatically:

var elem = document.getElementById("control");
var bBox = elem.getBBox();
var scaleX = 2;
var scaleY = 2;
$(elem).attr("transform", "scale("+scaleX+", "+scaleY+") translate("+-bBox.width/2+","+-bBox.height/2+") ");
33

If you know the coordinates of the center point, then you can combine a translate and scale in one transformation. The translation is calculated as: (1 - scale) * currentPosition.

If the center is (10, 20) and you are scaling by 3 then translate by (1 - 3)*10, (1 - 3)*20 = (-20, -40):

<g transform="translate(-20, -40) scale(3)">
    <path d="M45,11.5H33.333c0.735-1.159,1.167-2.528,1.167-4C34.5,3.364,31.136,0,27,0s-7.5,3.364-7.5,7.5c0,1.472,0.432,2.841,1.167,4H9l-9,32h54L45,11.5z M22.5,7.5C22.5,5.019,24.519,3,27,3s4.5,2.019,4.5,4.5c0,1.752-1.017,3.257-2.481,4h-4.037 C23.517,10.757,22.5,9.252,22.5,7.5z" id="control"/>
</g>

The transformations are applied in reverse order from the one they are declared, so in the example, above, the scale is performed first and then the translate. Scaling affects the coordinates so the translation here is in scaled coordinates.

You can calculate the center point programmatically using element.getBBox().

  • Thank for you this, will answer as correct when I can. Out of interest, element.getBBox() just returns a SVG rect with values height: 43.5, width: 54, x: 0, y: 0... would I use the width and height values / 2? – Hanpan Jul 26 '12 at 14:39
  • Yes, exactly your center point is (width / 2 + x, height / 2 + y). – ᴇʟᴇvᴀтᴇ Jul 26 '12 at 14:44
  • 1
    Note that if the path isn't at 0, 0, you need to add the bbox.x & bbox.y values to the calculation, e.g. (1-scale) * (bbox.x + bbox.width/2) – maxedison Aug 10 '15 at 22:27
  • 1
    I believe you can avoid the math for the center by doing an additional translation. Example, if the center is (cx, cy) you can do transform="translate(cx, cy) scale(3) translate(-cx, -cy)" – urraka Jan 3 at 1:42
  • Also look at this one for completeness. – Ethan Apr 25 at 9:00
10

You can alter the origin to center:

.scaled-path-svg {
  svg {
    path {
      transform-origin: center;
      transform: scale(1.1);
    }
  }
}
  • Thanks! Such a life saver – cacoder Sep 14 '18 at 17:43
1

The answer provided by aetheria earlier is great. There is another thing to take care of as well -- stroke-width, so that the outline stays of the same width while the object scales. Usage:

stroke-width: (1/scaling-factor)

So, if your scaling is by say 2, then:

stroke-width: (0.5)

NOTE: You shouldn't missout the transform: translate(...) scale(2) as mentioned by aetheria.

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