105

What is the best way to assign to multiple columns using data.table? For example:

f <- function(x) {c("hi", "hello")}
x <- data.table(id = 1:10)

I would like to do something like this (of course this syntax is incorrect):

x[ , (col1, col2) := f(), by = "id"]

And to extend that, I may have many columns with names stored in a variable (say col_names) and I would like to do:

x[ , col_names := another_f(), by = "id", with = FALSE]

What is the correct way to do something like this?

  • 1
    This looks like it has been answered: stackoverflow.com/questions/11308754/… – Alex Jul 27 '12 at 20:52
  • Alex, That answer is close but it doesn't seem to work in combination with by as @Christoph_J is correct to say. Link to your question added to FR#2120 "Drop needing with=FALSE for LHS of :=", so it won't get forgotten to revisit. – Matt Dowle Aug 8 '12 at 15:29
  • To be clear, f() is a function returning multiple values, one for each of your columns. – smci May 4 '18 at 6:10
133

This now works in v1.8.3 on R-Forge. Thanks for highlighting it!

x <- data.table(a = 1:3, b = 1:6) 
f <- function(x) {list("hi", "hello")} 
x[ , c("col1", "col2") := f(), by = a][]
#    a b col1  col2
# 1: 1 1   hi hello
# 2: 2 2   hi hello
# 3: 3 3   hi hello
# 4: 1 4   hi hello
# 5: 2 5   hi hello
# 6: 3 6   hi hello

x[ , c("mean", "sum") := list(mean(b), sum(b)), by = a][]
#    a b col1  col2 mean sum
# 1: 1 1   hi hello  2.5   5
# 2: 2 2   hi hello  3.5   7
# 3: 3 3   hi hello  4.5   9
# 4: 1 4   hi hello  2.5   5
# 5: 2 5   hi hello  3.5   7
# 6: 3 6   hi hello  4.5   9 

mynames = c("Name1", "Longer%")
x[ , (mynames) := list(mean(b) * 4, sum(b) * 3), by = a]
#     a b col1  col2 mean sum Name1 Longer%
# 1: 1 1   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 2: 2 2   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 3: 3 3   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27
# 4: 1 4   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 5: 2 5   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 6: 3 6   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27


x[ , mynames := list(mean(b) * 4, sum(b) * 3), by = a, with = FALSE][] # same
#    a b col1  col2 mean sum Name1 Longer%
# 1: 1 1   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 2: 2 2   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 3: 3 3   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27
# 4: 1 4   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 5: 2 5   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 6: 3 6   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27

x[ , get("mynames") := list(mean(b) * 4, sum(b) * 3), by = a][]  # same
#    a b col1  col2 mean sum Name1 Longer%
# 1: 1 1   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 2: 2 2   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 3: 3 3   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27
# 4: 1 4   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 5: 2 5   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 6: 3 6   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27

x[ , eval(mynames) := list(mean(b) * 4, sum(b) * 3), by = a][]   # same
#    a b col1  col2 mean sum Name1 Longer%
# 1: 1 1   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 2: 2 2   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 3: 3 3   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27
# 4: 1 4   hi hello  2.5   5    10      15
# 5: 2 5   hi hello  3.5   7    14      21
# 6: 3 6   hi hello  4.5   9    18      27
  • Thanks for this answer and the examples. How should I modify the following line in order to get two columns for each objectName from the dim output, rather than one column with two rows? data.table(objectName=ls())[,c("rows","cols"):=dim(get(objectName)),by=objectName] (I'm using data.table 1.8.11) – dnlbrky May 19 '14 at 2:00
  • @dnlbrky dim returns a vector so converting that to type list should rotate it; e.g. [,c("rows","cols"):=as.list(dim(get(objectName))),by=objectNa‌​me]. Trouble is that as.list has call overhead and also copies the small vector. If efficiency is a problem as number of groups rises then please let us know. – Matt Dowle May 21 '14 at 11:49
  • Thanks @Matt_Dowle. I had tried list but not as.list. Speed isn't an issue. Just wanted a quick way to find objects in the environment that had a certain number of columns or rows. This is off topic, but... what do you think about adding NCOL to tables()? – dnlbrky May 23 '14 at 0:34
  • 1
    Hi Matt. The first example in your second code block (i.e. x[,mynames:=list(mean(b)*4,sum(b)*3),by=a,with=FALSE][]) now throws a warning, so maybe remove it? On a related note, has anyone suggested that, with options(datatable.WhenJisSymbolThenCallingScope=TRUE), an assignment like x[,mynames:=list(mean(b)*4,sum(b)*3),by=a] should in fact work? Seems like that would be consistent with the other changes, though I guess it might break too much existing user code (?). – Josh O'Brien Nov 29 '16 at 17:49
  • 1
    @PanFrancisco Without by=a it will work, but return a different answer. The mean(a) and sum(a) aggregates are being recycled within each group when by=a. Without by=a it just sticks the mean and sum for the entire column into each cell (i.e. different numbers). – Matt Dowle Feb 24 '18 at 0:44
28

The following shorthand notation might be useful. All credit goes to Andrew Brooks, specifically this article.

dt[,`:=`(avg=mean(mpg), med=median(mpg), min=min(mpg)), by=cyl]
  • 2
    Fast , Clear , Simple , awesome code. – rane May 7 '18 at 3:47

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