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I am using this command to back up my 4 GB MMC card on BeagleBone Black which is running Ångström Linux:

beaglebone:/# dd if=/dev/mmcblk0 | ssh admin@192.168.1.123 "dd of=/volume1/homes/admin/test.img"

It seems to be working great. But I'm wondering, do I need to unmount the SD card? What if things change the SD card during the backup? How do I avoid this or avoid getting a corrupt image?

  • What happened then? – user391339 Oct 20 '14 at 2:19
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If you mount the SD card in read only no, you don't need to umount it.

But if it is mounted RW, in case you make even one operation you're very likely to get an inconsistent filesystem.

So either you umount it or you remount it in RO.

  • dmesg says it's mounted RW (because beaglebone doesn't support reading the read only switch) and when I try to do "umount /dev/mmcblk*" I get an error saying they aren't mounted. Any idea why that would be? I know the entire file system for booting linux is on the sd card in beaglebone, so I'm confused. – Eradicatore Jul 27 '12 at 19:35
  • are you sure it says it's mounted RW? Or is it just that the device is RW? Check /proc/mounts , if it is not there, it is not mounted. – Ottavio Campana Jul 30 '12 at 9:23
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    Ok, so it's not there in /proc/mounts. But then I'm confused how the sd card is being used. Clearly all my files and changes are persistent in linux. Its not like it's running out of RAM. So how is the sd card in /dev/mmcblk0 being updated with my changes if it's not mounted? And assuming there is somebody doing the updates (as there must be) then how do I prevent those updates to the sd card while dd is backing it up? – Eradicatore Aug 1 '12 at 21:33
  • Well, that really depends on your application. Without seeing the system it's hard to tell hot it works. Maybe the card is just mounted when the system has to write and then umounted. – Ottavio Campana Aug 2 '12 at 7:01

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