Is there a numpy builtin to do something like the following? That is, take a list d and return a list filtered_d with any outlying elements removed based on some assumed distribution of the points in d.

import numpy as np

def reject_outliers(data):
    m = 2
    u = np.mean(data)
    s = np.std(data)
    filtered = [e for e in data if (u - 2 * s < e < u + 2 * s)]
    return filtered

>>> d = [2,4,5,1,6,5,40]
>>> filtered_d = reject_outliers(d)
>>> print filtered_d
[2,4,5,1,6,5]

I say 'something like' because the function might allow for varying distributions (poisson, gaussian, etc.) and varying outlier thresholds within those distributions (like the m I've used here).

  • Related: Can scipy.stats identify and mask obvious outliers?, though that question seems to deal with more complex situations. For the simple task you described, an external package seems to be overkill. – Sven Marnach Jul 27 '12 at 11:22
  • I was thinking that given the number of builtins in the main numpy library it was strange that there was nothing to do this. It seems like quite a common thing to do with raw, noisy data. – aaren Jul 27 '12 at 12:10
up vote 71 down vote accepted

This method is almost identical to yours, just more numpyst (also working on numpy arrays only):

def reject_outliers(data, m=2):
    return data[abs(data - np.mean(data)) < m * np.std(data)]
  • 3
    That method works good enough if m is sufficiently large (e.g. m=6), but for small values of m this suffers from the mean the variance not being robust estimators. – Benjamin Bannier May 15 '13 at 9:53
  • 22
    that isn't really a complaint about the method though, but a complaint about the vague notion of an 'outlier' – Eelco Hoogendoorn Aug 15 '14 at 8:48
  • how do you choose an m? – john ktejik Sep 16 '17 at 22:10
  • 1
    I have not gotten this to work. I keep getting an error return data[abs(data - np.mean(data)) < m * np.std(data)] TypeError: only integer scalar arrays can be converted to a scalar index OR it just freezes my program – john ktejik Sep 16 '17 at 22:26
  • @johnktejik data arg needs to be a numpy array. – Sander van Leeuwen Dec 5 '17 at 15:46

Something important when dealing with outliers is that one should try to use estimators as robust as possible. The mean of a distribution will be biased by outliers but e.g. the median will be much less.

Building on eumiro's answer:

def reject_outliers(data, m = 2.):
    d = np.abs(data - np.median(data))
    mdev = np.median(d)
    s = d/mdev if mdev else 0.
    return data[s<m]

Here I have replace the mean with the more robust median and the standard deviation with the absolute distance to the median. I then scaled the distances by their (again) median value so that m is on a reasonable relative scale.

  • 3
    Nice work, this should be the accepted answer. – Matt Davis Feb 27 '17 at 4:05
  • 4
    itl.nist.gov/div898/handbook/eda/section3/eda35h.htm this is basically the modified Z-score referenced here, but with a different threshold. If my math is right, they recommend an m of 3.5 / .6745 ~= 5.189 (they multiply s by .6745 and specify an m of 3.5...also take abs(s)). Can anybody explain the choice of m? Or is it something you'll identify from your particular dataset? – Charlie Apr 5 '17 at 21:53
  • 1
    @stackoverflowuser2010: Like I said, this depends on your specific requirements, i.e., how clean we need to signal sample to be (false positives), or how many signal measurements we can afford to throw away to keep the signal clean (false negatives). As for a specific example evaluation for a certain use case, see e.g., desy.de/~blist/notes/whyeffpur.ps.gz. – Benjamin Bannier Jun 28 '17 at 11:57
  • 1
    I'm looking for the Igleqicz and Hoaglin paper, but haven't found it yet. Is there a reason given for why the 0.6745 factor is hardcoded into the modified Z-score provided by NIST? It does seem odd to include a scaling factor on one side of the test and then an arbitrary threshold of 3.5 on the other. That scaling factor must have a meaning, otherwise it would have been as easy to drop it and suggest values greater than 5 are outliers. – Omegaman Aug 24 '17 at 16:53
  • 1
    I get the following error when I call the function with a list of floats: TypeError: only integer scalar arrays can be converted to a scalar index – Vasilis Mar 19 at 2:29

Building on Benjamin's, using pandas.Series, and replacing MAD with IQR:

def reject_outliers(sr, iq_range=0.5):
    pcnt = (1 - iq_range) / 2
    qlow, median, qhigh = sr.dropna().quantile([pcnt, 0.50, 1-pcnt])
    iqr = qhigh - qlow
    return sr[ (sr - median).abs() <= iqr]

For instance, if you set iq_range=0.6, the percentiles of the interquartile-range would become: 0.20 <--> 0.80, so more outliers will be included.

Benjamin Bannier's answer yields a pass-through when the median of distances from the median is 0, so I found this modified version a bit more helpful for cases as given in the example below.

def reject_outliers_2(data, m = 2.):
    d = np.abs(data - np.median(data))
    mdev = np.median(d)
    s = d/(mdev if mdev else 1.)
    return data[s<m]

Example:

data_points = np.array([10, 10, 10, 17, 10, 10])
print(reject_outliers(data_points))
print(reject_outliers_2(data_points))

Gives:

[[10, 10, 10, 17, 10, 10]]  # 17 is not filtered
[10, 10, 10, 10, 10]  # 17 is filtered (it's distance, 7, is greater than m)

An alternative is to make a robust estimation of the standard deviation (assuming Gaussian statistics). Looking up online calculators, I see that the 90% percentile corresponds to 1.2815σ and the 95% is 1.645σ (http://vassarstats.net/tabs.html?#z)

As a simple example:

import numpy as np

# Create some random numbers
x = np.random.normal(5, 2, 1000)

# Calculate the statistics
print("Mean= ", np.mean(x))
print("Median= ", np.median(x))
print("Max/Min=", x.max(), " ", x.min())
print("StdDev=", np.std(x))
print("90th Percentile", np.percentile(x, 90))

# Add a few large points
x[10] += 1000
x[20] += 2000
x[30] += 1500

# Recalculate the statistics
print()
print("Mean= ", np.mean(x))
print("Median= ", np.median(x))
print("Max/Min=", x.max(), " ", x.min())
print("StdDev=", np.std(x))
print("90th Percentile", np.percentile(x, 90))

# Measure the percentile intervals and then estimate Standard Deviation of the distribution, both from median to the 90th percentile and from the 10th to 90th percentile
p90 = np.percentile(x, 90)
p10 = np.percentile(x, 10)
p50 = np.median(x)
# p50 to p90 is 1.2815 sigma
rSig = (p90-p50)/1.2815
print("Robust Sigma=", rSig)

rSig = (p90-p10)/(2*1.2815)
print("Robust Sigma=", rSig)

The output I get is:

Mean=  4.99760520022
Median=  4.95395274981
Max/Min= 11.1226494654   -2.15388472011
Sigma= 1.976629928
90th Percentile 7.52065379649

Mean=  9.64760520022
Median=  4.95667658782
Max/Min= 2205.43861943   -2.15388472011
Sigma= 88.6263902244
90th Percentile 7.60646688694

Robust Sigma= 2.06772555531
Robust Sigma= 1.99878292462

Which is close to the expected value of 2.

If we want to remove points above/below 5 standard deviations (with 1000 points we would expect 1 value > 3 standard deviations):

y = x[abs(x - p50) < rSig*5]

# Print the statistics again
print("Mean= ", np.mean(y))
print("Median= ", np.median(y))
print("Max/Min=", y.max(), " ", y.min())
print("StdDev=", np.std(y))

Which gives:

Mean=  4.99755359935
Median=  4.95213030447
Max/Min= 11.1226494654   -2.15388472011
StdDev= 1.97692712883

I have no idea which approach is the more efficent/robust

I wanted to do something similar, except setting the number to NaN rather than removing it from the data, since if you remove it you change the length which can mess up plotting (i.e. if you're only removing outliers from one column in a table, but you need it to remain the same as the other columns so you can plot them against each other).

To do so I used numpy's masking functions:

def reject_outliers(data, m=2):
    stdev = np.std(data)
    mean = np.mean(data)
    maskMin = mean - stdev * m
    maskMax = mean + stdev * m
    mask = np.ma.masked_outside(data, maskMin, maskMax)
    print('Masking values outside of {} and {}'.format(maskMin, maskMax))
    return mask

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