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I am trying to write a remote control program for omxplayer on my rasperry Pi

I can get omxplayer to run ok in a child process but I don't seem to be able to get the pipes working correctly to actually send commands to the child process.

int fd_pipe[2];
pipe (fd_pipe);

while(1) {  // main accept() loop

    printf("server: got connection from %s\n", s);

    /* Attempt to fork and check for errors */
    if( (pid=fork()) == -1){
        fprintf(stderr,"Fork error. Exiting.\n");  /* something went wrong */
        exit(1);
    }

    if (pid==0) 
    { // this is the child process
        dup2(0, fd_pipe[0]);
        close(fd_pipe[1]);


        if(execl("/usr/bin/top","top",NULL) == -1){
            fprintf(stderr,"execl Error!");
            exit(1);
        }

        //try and send command here
        write(fd_pipe[0], "q", 1);

        exit(0);

    } else {

        close(new_fd);  // parent doesn't need this
        dup2(1, fd_pipe[1]);

        //try and send here too
        write(fd_pipe[0], "q", 1);
    }
}

When I was testing with top and ran the program, I can see the top output appear in the terminal window and I can see the q command in the window but it looks like its going to the parent process rather than the child. Am I doing something wrong with the pipes or is it not possible to send commands to the spawned child process?

I tried changing the child dup2 statement to copy from the pipe to stdin

        { // this is the child process
        dup2(fd_pipe[0], 0);

But then top fails to start with a failed tty get message

1 Answer 1

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To interact with a program that expects to be able to manipulate a terminal, you should use a pseudo tty. This will avoid the failed tty get error.

/*...*/
#include <pty.h>

void do_child () {
    if (execlp("top", "top", (const char *)0) < 0) {
        perror("exec top");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    /* NOTREACHED */
}

void do_parent (int fd, pid_t p) {
    sleep(5);
    char r;
    write(fd, "q", 1);
    while (read(fd, &r, 1) > 0) { write(1, &r, 1); }
    waitpid(p, 0, 0);
    close(fd);
}

int main () {
    int fd;
    pid_t p = forkpty(&fd, 0, 0, 0);
    switch (p) {
    case 0:  do_child();
             /* NOTREACHED */
    case -1: perror("forkpty");
             exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    default: break;
    }
    do_parent(fd, p);
    return 0;
}

Note that forkpty is not POSIX, but an interface that is available on BSD and Linux flavors of UNIX.

You can execute top in a batch mode, but you can't use a command to quit. You have to kill it.

void do_child () {
    if (execlp("top", "top", "-b", (const char *)0) < 0) {
        perror("exec top");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    /* NOT REACHED */
}

void do_parent (pid_t p) {
    sleep(5);
    if (kill(p, SIGINT) < 0) {
        perror("kill");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    waitpid(p, 0, 0);
}

int main () {
    pid_t p;
    switch ((p = fork())) {
    case 0:  do_child();
    case -1: perror("fork"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    default: break;
    }
    do_parent(p);
    return 0;
}

Although running in batch mode would allow you to open the process with a simpler call (such as popen as mux suggests), unless that call returns the process id of the child, you won't be able to kill it (without executing a pkill, or dig through the process table to find the right child process to kill).

I think you have some confusion about how to use dup2. The manual page uses the terms oldfd and newfd, and it means that oldfd will become newfd. To illustrate, here is a simple program that redirects stdout and stderr to a log file, calls a function, and then restores stdout and stderr afterward.

void do_something () {
    fputs("Error message\n", stderr);
    puts("This is regular output.");
    fputs("Error message\n", stderr);
    puts("This is regular output.");
}

int main () {
    int fd = creat("/tmp/output.log", 0664);
    int outfd = dup(fileno(stdout));
    int errfd = dup(fileno(stderr));
    fflush(stdout);
    fflush(stderr);
    dup2(fd, fileno(stdout));
    dup2(fd, fileno(stderr));
    setlinebuf(stdout);

    do_something();

    fflush(stdout);
    fflush(stderr);
    dup2(outfd, fileno(stdout));
    dup2(errfd, fileno(stderr));
    close(outfd);
    close(errfd);

    fputs("Error to the screen\n", stderr);
    puts("Regular output to screen");
    fputs("Error to the screen\n", stderr);
    puts("Regular output to screen");

    return 0;
}

As mux pointed out, your program is writing to the wrong end of the pipe. The pipe command returns a unidirectional pair of file descriptors, where what ever is written to fd_pipe[1] can be read from fd_pipe[0].

15
  • Thank you user315052 and @mux - oops I mean to say i was writing to fd_pipe[1]. I am running top as an example rather than the end requirement. I am trying to use it to run a media player called omxplayer in a child process and then be able to send commands to that process. I have removed the write from the child process and only have write(fd_pipe[1], "q", 1);
    – Karl
    Jul 30, 2012 at 12:21
  • @Karl: So, you didn't actually try to use the pseudo tty solution? Why not?
    – jxh
    Jul 30, 2012 at 14:27
  • i'm trying however i am having trouble finding the library for it. I have pty.h installed but when I try and compile i am getting undefined reference to `forkpty' errors. So I am trying to link in -l/usr/lib/libutils but its reporting: /usr/bin/ld: cannot find -l/usr/lib/libutils
    – Karl
    Jul 30, 2012 at 15:01
  • @Karl: Add -lutil to link int libutils
    – jxh
    Jul 30, 2012 at 15:02
  • urg i thought i had tried -lutil but obv not. It is compiling now. The q command still doesn't appear to be registering though. I can see the top process fire up (although its not echoed to the main terminal now which is not important) but it doesn't quit when I write to the fd. it will quit when I close the fd but i think that is due to the pty being closed rather than the command. I conirmed this by sending a different command and it stll quits at the close(fd).I tried you example above and i'm not sure it works properly as top doesn't start up until after the sleepin parent
    – Karl
    Jul 31, 2012 at 10:26

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