22

Suppose I have the following vector:

x <- c(8, 6, 9, 9, 7, 3, 2, 5, 5, 1, 6, 8, 5, 2, 9, 3, 5, 10, 8, 2)

How can I find which elements are either 8 or 9?

  • If you meant "detect all duplicated elements". R has a useful fn duplicated, and you can get all duplicates with duplicated(x) | duplicated(x, fromLast=T) – smci Aug 17 '18 at 0:17
39

This is one way to do it. First I get the indices at which x is either 8 or 9. Then we can verify that at those indices, x is indeed 8 and 9.

> inds <- which(x %in% c(8,9))
> inds
[1]  1  3  4 12 15 19
> x[inds]
[1] 8 9 9 8 9 8
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    But suppose I'm looking for the specific indexes of two values without their orders sorted. How would I get a result of "26, 1" instead of "1, 26" if I'm looking for the indexes of Z and A in the alphabet? which( letters %in% c( 'z', 'a' ) ) – dasf Sep 17 '17 at 17:40
  • @dasf use any kind of sort, like bubblesort – Khushraj Rathod Jan 25 '19 at 14:54
10

You could try the | operator for short conditions

which(x == 8 | x == 9)
| improve this answer | |
2

In this specific case you could also use grep:

# option 1
grep('[89]',x)
# option 2
grep('8|9',x)

which both give:

[1]  1  3  4 12 15 19

When you also want to detect number with more than one digit, the second option is preferred:

> grep('10|8',x)
[1]  1 12 18 19

However, I did put emphasis on this specific case at the start of my answer for a reason. As @DavidArenburg mentioned, this could lead to unintended results. Using for example grep('1|8',x) will detect both 1 and 10:

> grep('1|8',x)
[1]  1 10 12 18 19

In order to avoid that side-effect, you will have to wrap the numbers to be detected in word-bounderies:

> grep('\\b1\\b|8',x)
[1]  1 10 12 19

Now, the 10 isn't detected.

| improve this answer | |
1

Alternatively, if you do not need to use the indices but just the elements you can do

> x <- sample(1:10,20,replace=TRUE)
> x
 [1]  6  4  7  2  9  3  3  5  4  7  2  1  4  9  1  6 10  4  3 10
> x[8<=x & x<=9]
[1] 9 9
| improve this answer | |
0

Here is a generalized solution to find the locations of all target values (only works for vectors and 1-dimmensional arrays).

locate <- function(x, targets) {
    results <- lapply(targets, function(target) which(x == target))
    names(results) <- targets
    results
}

This function returns a list because each target may have any number of matches, including zero. The list is sorted (and named) in the original order of the targets.

Here is an example in use:

sequence <- c(1:10, 1:10)

locate(sequence, c(2,9))
$`2`
[1]  2 12

$`9`
[1]  9 19
| improve this answer | |
-1

grepl maybe a useful function. Note that grepl appears in versions of R 2.9.0 and later. What's handy about grepl is that it returns a logical vector of the same length as x.

grepl(8, x)
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
[13] FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE

grepl(9, x)
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE
[13] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE

To arrive at your answer, you could do the following

grepl(8,x) | grepl(9,x)
| improve this answer | |
  • I like grepl as well, great for filtering dataframes on text strings, etc. Thanks for the OR example - I thought it would be that simple, but I kept trying || which is the wrong syntax. – atomicules Nov 29 '10 at 17:37
  • 4
    This is a very dangerous solution. grepl(9, c(9, 99, 654649)) will return TRUE for all of these. One should be very careful with exact matches and regex. – David Arenburg Apr 9 '16 at 20:20

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