22

I am suppose to let the user enter a DateTime format, but I need to validate it to check if it is acceptable. The user might enter "yyyy-MM-dd" and it would be fine, but they can also enter "MM/yyyyMM/ddd" or any other combination. Is there a way to validate this?

0
23

Are you looking for something like this?

DateTime expectedDate;
if (!DateTime.TryParse("07/27/2012", out expectedDate))
{
    Console.Write("Luke I am not your datetime.... NOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!");
}

If your user knows the exact format(s) needed...

string[] formats = { "MM/dd/yyyy", "M/d/yyyy", "M/dd/yyyy", "MM/d/yyyy" };
DateTime expectedDate;
if (!DateTime.TryParseExact("07/27/2012", formats, new CultureInfo("en-US"), 
                            DateTimeStyles.None, out expectedDate))
{
    Console.Write("Thank you Mario, but the DateTime is in another format.");
}
5
  • 1
    This only validates specific DateTimes. The user is actually entering the "format" itself.
    – Kevin Cho
    Jul 27 '12 at 21:51
  • you are not really clear to me...you want the user enter just the date in whatever format and you want it to validate guessing the right format? are you sure your format will not collide in ambiguity?? wouldn't be MUCH better just to suggest the format to the user? Jul 27 '12 at 21:54
  • 3
    -1 This is not what Mindquake is asking for. They want to validate a format string, not a date string.
    – Tergiver
    Jul 27 '12 at 22:22
  • 2
    +1 for nerdy console writes, and because this is the answer I was looking for. Jul 1 '13 at 22:03
  • Just a small hint: In Hungary guys use a "merged" european and us format: dd/MM/yyyy. Therefore "18/02/2020" is completely valid there. Feb 18 '20 at 9:25
11

I don't know of any way to actually validate the format they enter since sometimes you want to intentionally include characters that translate into anything. One thing you might consider is allowing the user to self validate by showing a preview of what their entered format translates into.

2
  • +1 This is the best answer (IMO). Because the definition of a valid format string is very loose, confirming with user is the best possible solution.
    – Tergiver
    Jul 27 '12 at 22:24
  • You don't need to validate to show the preview because if you were to do something like DateTime.Now.ToString("This is made up and won't work"); the preview would show T1i30 i30 14a4e up an4 will noP work. You could wrap in a try/catch block to handle anything really strange.
    – Jason
    Jun 4 '13 at 19:14
10

I assume you want to know if the specified format string is valid...

For this you could round-trip it:

private bool IsValidDateFormat(string dateFormat)
{
    try
    {
        String dts=DateTime.Now.ToString(dateFormat, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
        DateTime.ParseExact(dts, dateFormat, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
        return true;
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }
}
0
3

Unless I am remembering incorrectly, the only invalid DateTime format strings are one character long. You can assume any 2 or more character DateTime format string is valid.

DateTime.ParseExact("qq", "qq", null) == DateTime.Today
DateTime.ParseExact("myy", "501", null) == "05/01/2001"

Standard (1 character)
Custom (>1 character)

For reference, allowed single character strings as formats:

d,D,f,F,g,G,m,M,o,O,r,R,s,T,u,U,y,Y

Any other character, such as q, by itself is invalid. All other strings will be successfully parsed as formatting strings.

2
  • You can also prefix a % to make the single-character strings valid too. DateTime.Now.ToString("%x") == "x". Jul 27 '12 at 23:57
  • @MarkusJarderot: True, I was trying to focus on the fact that "Invalid DateTime format" is very rare due to the flexibility of it. In fact the only reason there are any invalid formats is that you can't fact finger a y as h and get weird results.
    – Guvante
    Jul 28 '12 at 0:27
0

You don't talk about your validation strategy. Anyway you should use something involving regular expressions and than apply allowed patterns. This would help against the formal validity .. then you have to take care about the actual contents and be sure the values are correct according as month, day and year.

Anyway several people suggested to use the DateTime.TryParse() method to let the substrate take care for you. But you'll have to specify the format anyway! so there's no magic! you would fall in ambiguity otherwise

0

This works for me-

try
{
  String formattedDate = DateTime.Now.ToString(dateFormat);
  DateTime.Parse(formattedDate);
  return true;
}
catch (Exception)
{
  return false;
}
-2

My solution was to mark the input-field as read-only and allow users to change the value only by jqueryui datepicker.

It is intuitive. You can specify your preferred format and need only to validate this one format.

Otherwise you may get really in trouble. What are you going to do with "02/03/2020" in USA you interpret it as the third of February, but for south america it is definitely the second of March. And there are a lot of other Date formats around the globe.

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