6

Seeing as this value is unique and present for all users in a mongo database, are there any particular caveats to using this as a user identifier in a web application?

Particular issues I may be considering include if in the future the users need to be transferred.

10

... are there any particular caveats to using this as a user identifier in a web application?

A few that I've seen:

  1. It's not great for URLs. Twitter gives me a URL like http://twitter.com/gatesvp, with an ObjectId you get a url like http://example.com/ab12ab12ab12ab12ab12ab12.
  2. The ObjectId shards very poorly. It's not really random, it's somewhat sequential, so new users will cluster on shards rather than distribute randomly.
  3. You often need another unique identifier. Most websites have a requirement for unique e-mail or unique user name. Yes you can create a unique index on the "user name", but then you have two unique indexes, one that's useful and one that's just a random number.
  4. You will be referencing this everywhere. Your users' data will typically be spread across multiple collections all with a pointer to the "userId". Having ObjectIds (or Guids), means that you are constantly copy-pasting these big IDs everywhere and storing them in the DB.

Particular issues I may be considering include if in the future the users need to be transferred.

Transferred to where? Once you start storing user's data in MongoDB, the IDs are going to be the least of your problems transferring to another DB. All modern DBs can handle some form of String or Binary as the primary key ID, so your transfer should work just fine. But most of the complexity will have nothing to do with the ID.

  • Well I plan on offering usernames and emails too (so shortlinks are possible) but I mean internally for the logic of my application are ObjectIds appropriate or should i generate another numeric id? – arcyqwerty Jul 28 '12 at 3:37
  • Is sharding necessarily sorted by _id? – arcyqwerty Jul 28 '12 at 3:37
  • And in terms of transfer, I mean something like exporting the data and importing to another mongodb instance. (not switching to sql or anything). I know that _id is assigned on insert most of the time, so would they preserve the old ones or will all references need to be updated? – arcyqwerty Jul 28 '12 at 3:38
  • @arcyqwerty: As GatesVP mentioned, a default ObjectID is fine for uniqueness but does not make a good shard key. However .. you do not have to shard on the _id field. An ObjectID would generally be an easier unique key to work with than an incrementing numeric ID .. as any sort of sequence number will require you to work out the next one to allocate. – Stennie Jul 28 '12 at 6:40
  • @arcyqwerty: Would also note that whatever you choose as an _id field will be an immutable value (i.e. can never be changed). Further to GatesVP's suggestion #3, you could consider using a username as the _id .. as long as that doesn't have to change. A username would have the side effect of being a more readable reference than an ObjectID/GUID if you are looking at related documents. The size difference is probably a non-issue .. ObjectIDs will be 12 binary bytes; an average username may only be slightly less. – Stennie Jul 28 '12 at 6:46

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