26

Redis is used to save data but it costs a lot of memory, and its memory usage up to 52.5%. I deleted half of the keys in redis, and the return code of the delete operation is ok, but its memory usage doesn't reduce.

What's the reason? Thanks in Advance.

My operation code is as below:

// save data
m_pReply = (redisReply *)redisCommand(m_pCntxt, "set %b %b", mykey.data(), mykey.size(), &myval, sizeof(myval));
// del data
m_pReply = (redisReply *)redisCommand(m_pCntxt, "del %b", mykey.data(), mykey.size());

The redis info:

redis 127.0.0.1:6979> info
redis_version:2.4.8
redis_git_sha1:00000000
redis_git_dirty:0
arch_bits:64
multiplexing_api:epoll
gcc_version:4.4.6
process_id:28799
uptime_in_seconds:1289592
uptime_in_days:14
lru_clock:127925
used_cpu_sys:148455.30
used_cpu_user:38023.92
used_cpu_sys_children:23187.60
used_cpu_user_children:123989.72
connected_clients:22
connected_slaves:0
client_longest_output_list:0
client_biggest_input_buf:0
blocked_clients:0
used_memory:31903334872
used_memory_human:29.71G
used_memory_rss:34414981120
used_memory_peak:34015653264
used_memory_peak_human:31.68G
mem_fragmentation_ratio:1.08
mem_allocator:jemalloc-2.2.5
loading:0
aof_enabled:0
changes_since_last_save:177467
bgsave_in_progress:0
last_save_time:1343456339
bgrewriteaof_in_progress:0
total_connections_received:820
total_commands_processed:2412759064
expired_keys:0
evicted_keys:0
keyspace_hits:994257907
keyspace_misses:32760132
pubsub_channels:0
pubsub_patterns:0
latest_fork_usec:11672476
vm_enabled:0
role:slave
master_host:192.168.252.103
master_port:6479
master_link_status:up
master_last_io_seconds_ago:0
master_sync_in_progress:0
db0:keys=66372158,expires=0
2
  • 1
    Unfortunately you have to restart redis-server process. Look at stackoverflow.com/a/5994981/1089294
    – underley
    Commented Jul 28, 2012 at 21:19
  • The system is running now, I can't restart it. Maybe you are right, the redis del key not really free malloc. Commented Jul 31, 2012 at 2:34

3 Answers 3

28

Please refer to Memory allocation section on the following link:

http://redis.io/topics/memory-optimization

I quoted it here:

Redis will not always free up (return) memory to the OS when keys are removed. This is not something special about Redis, but it is how most malloc() implementations work. For example if you fill an instance with 5GB worth of data, and then remove the equivalent of 2GB of data, the Resident Set Size (also known as the RSS, which is the number of memory pages consumed by the process) will probably still be around 5GB, even if Redis will claim that the user memory is around 3GB. This happens because the underlying allocator can't easily release the memory. For example often most of the removed keys were allocated in the same pages as the other keys that still exist.

4
  • 2
    Thanks for this. So is the 'solution' here a hard restart of redis? Commented Jan 26, 2015 at 11:44
  • 1
    @stevejalim, I think so, but I am not sure if there are any configurable way to free the allocated memory.
    – Wei Zhong
    Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 18:47
  • @SteveJalim If you find your setup always having lots of keys created and deleted, I suggest compiling a redis build that uses a memory allocator that has better fragmentation avoidance such as jemalloc. It won't free the already allocated memory but it would help further reduce memory usage. Commented Sep 22, 2016 at 14:12
  • Doesn't used_memory_human:29.71G and used_memory_peak_human:31.68G indicate that less than 50% of redis reported user memory is freed? and doesn't the RSS which is reported by OS have nothing to do with it?
    – Larry Chu
    Commented Jul 23, 2018 at 22:33
10

Since Redis 4.0.0 there's a command for this:

MEMORY PURGE

Should do the trick: https://redis.io/commands/memory-purge

Note however that command docs state:

This command is currently implemented only when using jemalloc as an allocator, and evaluates to a benign NOOP for all others.

And the README reminds us that:

Redis is compiled and linked against libc malloc by default, with the exception of jemalloc being the default on Linux systems. This default was picked because jemalloc has proven to have fewer fragmentation problems than libc malloc.

3

A good starting point is to use the Redis CLI command: MEMORY DOCTOR.
It can give you very valuable information and point you to the potential issue.

some useful links:
MEMORY DOCTOR command docs
What is defragmentation and what are the Redis defragmentation configs

example:

  • Peak memory: In the past this instance used more than 150% the memory that is currently using. The allocator is normally not able to release memory after a peak, so you can expect to see a big fragmentation ratio, however this is actually harmless and is only due to the memory peak, and if the Redis instance Resident Set Size (RSS) is currently bigger than expected, the memory will be used as soon as you fill the Redis instance with more data. If the memory peak was only occasional and you want to try to reclaim memory, please try the MEMORY PURGE command, otherwise the only other option is to shutdown and restart the instance.
  • High total RSS: This instance has a memory fragmentation and RSS overhead greater than 1.4 (this means that the Resident Set Size of the Redis process is much larger than the sum of the logical allocations Redis performed). This problem is usually due either to a large peak memory (check if there is a peak memory entry above in the report) or may result from a workload that causes the allocator to fragment memory a lot. If the problem is a large peak memory, then there is no issue. Otherwise, make sure you are using the Jemalloc allocator and not the default libc malloc. Note: The currently used allocator is "jemalloc-5.1.0".
  • High allocator fragmentation: This instance has an allocator external fragmentation greater than 1.1. This problem is usually due either to a large peak memory (check if there is a peak memory entry above in the report) or may result from a workload that causes the allocator to fragment memory a lot. You can try enabling 'activedefrag' config option.

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