I am running slitaz distro, and would like to completely remove the root password. I have tried giving a blank password to the passwd command, however that did not seem to do the trick. It gave me an error password was too short, ans it still asked me for a password when I ssh-ed in. The password was just hiting the "Enter" key.

UPDATE:
Perhaps it has to do with the fact that slitaz uses dropbear for ssh? Because even with a blank password for root in /etc/shadow, it still prompts for a password.

closed as off topic by Mike Kwan, thiton, Don Roby, Jason Sturges, Graviton Jul 30 '12 at 6:43

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up vote 66 down vote accepted

Did you try passwd -d root? Most likely, this will do what you want.


You can also manually edit /etc/shadow: (Create a backup copy. Be sure that you can log even if you mess up, for example from a rescue system.) Search for "root". Typically, the root entry looks similar to

root:$X$SK5xfLB1ZW:0:0...

There, delete the second field (everything between the first and second colon):

root::0:0...

Save the file, and try logging in as root. It should skip the password prompt. (Like passwd -d, this is a "no password" solution. If you are really looking for a "blank password", that is "ask for a password, but accept if the user just presses Enter", look at the manpage of mkpasswd, and use mkpasswd to create the second field for the /etc/shadow.)

  • 25
    I can't resist the urge to add that having a passwordless root login is in most (all?) cases a bad idea. – InternetSeriousBusiness Jul 28 '12 at 11:58
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    Nope that did not work on my system. This is what I turned up as well from Google. However it still asks for a password – Plazgoth Jul 28 '12 at 11:58
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    Then you may have an issue with your SSH config: See the sshd_config(5) manpage, esp. PermitEmptyPasswords, PermitRootLogin. – tiwo Jul 28 '12 at 12:07
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    More likely, rather than having the password for root simply be blank, you'd like to lock the password so that it won't match any input. passwd --lock root or passwd -l root – JeremyFelix Jul 21 '15 at 15:19
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    What @JeremyFelix said is precisely what I needed; that should have been the answer! – ELLIOTTCABLE May 5 '16 at 4:38

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