235

I have read a lot of stackoverflow questions but none seems to be working for me. i am using math.round() to round off. this is the code:

class round{
    public static void main(String args[]){

    double a = 123.13698;
    double roundOff = Math.round(a*100)/100;

    System.out.println(roundOff);
}
}

the output i get is: 123 but i want it to be 123.14. i read that adding *100/100 will help but as you can see i didn't manage to get it to work.

it is absolutely essential for both input and output to be a double.

it would be great great help if you change the line 4 of the code above and post it.

3
  • 3
    With the *100/100 technique used above I believe you want to truncate, not round. Math.floor(a*100) / 100d) Think about what the math is doing: 123.1299 * 100 = 12312.99. Floor() = 12312.0 then /100 = 123.12
    – Tony Ennis
    Jul 28 '12 at 13:31
  • stackoverflow.com/a/10959430/621951 the best solution.It works. May 15 '13 at 19:08
  • 2
    Try Math.round(a * 100) / 100d; Oct 9 '15 at 17:11

12 Answers 12

508

Well this one works...

double roundOff = Math.round(a * 100.0) / 100.0;

Output is

123.14

Or as @Rufein said

 double roundOff = (double) Math.round(a * 100) / 100;

this will do it for you as well.

16
  • 8
    Could this be tweaked to round up to 3 or 5 decimal places ? Jul 28 '12 at 14:20
  • 2
    It also works double roundOff = (double) Math.round(a * 100) / 100;
    – Rufein
    Dec 5 '13 at 12:59
  • 2
    well yes, because it actually happened to me :) Feb 5 '15 at 13:18
  • 7
    Still wondering why no one mentioned new BigDecimal(123.13698).round(new MathContext(5)).doubleValue()
    – george_h
    Apr 16 '15 at 22:57
  • 2
    ( Math.round(395.0349999999 * 100 ) / 100.0. ) will become 395.03. I can see why as 395034 is nearest long that is then divided by 100. However I think generally people would expect the result as 395.04. Oct 3 '18 at 15:46
101
     double d = 2.34568;
     DecimalFormat f = new DecimalFormat("##.00");
     System.out.println(f.format(d));
12
  • it says DecimalFormat cannot be resolved to a type Jul 28 '12 at 13:36
  • 15
    did you import java.text.DecimalFormat; ? Jul 28 '12 at 13:42
  • 2
    that works only if double number is not lesser then 1 and greater then -1 - when that happens it doesnt show 0.
    – lukaszrys
    Jul 2 '15 at 19:10
  • 1
    double doubleValue = 245; DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("##.00"); System.out.println("value: " + Float.valueOf(df.format(doubleValue))); prints 245.0 not 245.00 Apr 7 '17 at 13:30
  • Decimal Format does not round off the last decimal value for any of its functions. The margin for the round off for all the functions is >5 but its supposed to be >4. Eg - 1.235 should round off to 1.24 but the DF formatting rounds it to 1.23 which is wrong. But Math.round is accurate. Nov 6 '17 at 21:46
71
String roundOffTo2DecPlaces(float val)
{
    return String.format("%.2f", val);
}
2
  • 2
    @CarlosA.Junior do you say using above way would not give consistent results ?
    – Arun
    Feb 16 '16 at 6:52
  • 4
    Yes @Arun. Using String.format, I can format the same way my country uses to round taxes' decimal places. Feb 16 '16 at 13:47
57
BigDecimal a = new BigDecimal("123.13698");
BigDecimal roundOff = a.setScale(2, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_EVEN);
System.out.println(roundOff);
2
  • 1
    BigDecimal.ROUND* is deprecated since Java 9.
    – Det
    Aug 6 '19 at 18:21
  • 3
    Yep, for Java 9+, use RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN to replicate this solution Jul 16 '20 at 11:47
14

Go back to your code, and replace 100 by 100.00 and let me know if it works. However, if you want to be formal, try this:

import java.text.DecimalFormat;
DecimalFormat df=new DecimalFormat("0.00");
String formate = df.format(value); 
double finalValue = (Double)df.parse(formate) ;
0
11

I know this is 2 year old question but as every body faces a problem to round off the values at some point of time.I would like to share a different way which can give us rounded values to any scale by using BigDecimal class .Here we can avoid extra steps which are required to get the final value if we use DecimalFormat("0.00") or using Math.round(a * 100) / 100 .

import java.math.BigDecimal;

public class RoundingNumbers {
    public static void main(String args[]){
        double number = 123.13698;
        int decimalsToConsider = 2;
        BigDecimal bigDecimal = new BigDecimal(number);
        BigDecimal roundedWithScale = bigDecimal.setScale(2, BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
        System.out.println("Rounded value with setting scale = "+roundedWithScale);

        bigDecimal = new BigDecimal(number);
        BigDecimal roundedValueWithDivideLogic = bigDecimal.divide(BigDecimal.ONE,decimalsToConsider,BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_UP);
        System.out.println("Rounded value with Dividing by one = "+roundedValueWithDivideLogic);

    }
}

This program would give us below output

Rounded value with setting scale = 123.14
Rounded value with Dividing by one = 123.14
1
  • 1
    You could also use BigDecimal.ROUND_HALF_EVEN to achieve a similar logic like Math.round() (1.204 = 1.20, 1.205 = 1.21).
    – zoku
    Oct 9 '17 at 14:06
11

Try :

class round{
public static void main(String args[]){

double a = 123.13698;
double roundOff = Math.round(a*100)/100;
String.format("%.3f", roundOff); //%.3f defines decimal precision you want
System.out.println(roundOff);   }}
10
double roundOff = Math.round(a*100)/100;

should be

double roundOff = Math.round(a*100)/100D;

Adding 'D' to 100 makes it Double literal, thus result produced will have precision

3
  • 1
    doesnt work the result is still 123.0 Jul 28 '12 at 13:31
  • I have moved 'F' to denominator now. It should work now
    – Arun
    Jul 28 '12 at 13:45
  • the output is even more messed up. 123.13999938964844 Jul 28 '12 at 13:52
6

This is long one but a full proof solution, never fails

Just pass your number to this function as a double, it will return you rounding the decimal value up to the nearest value of 5;

if 4.25, Output 4.25

if 4.20, Output 4.20

if 4.24, Output 4.20

if 4.26, Output 4.30

if you want to round upto 2 decimal places,then use

DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
roundToMultipleOfFive(Double.valueOf(df.format(number)));

if up to 3 places, new DecimalFormat("#.###")

if up to n places, new DecimalFormat("#.nTimes #")

 public double roundToMultipleOfFive(double x)
            {

                x=input.nextDouble();
                String str=String.valueOf(x);
                int pos=0;
                for(int i=0;i<str.length();i++)
                {
                    if(str.charAt(i)=='.')
                    {
                        pos=i;
                        break;
                    }
                }

                int after=Integer.parseInt(str.substring(pos+1,str.length()));
                int Q=after/5;
                int R =after%5;

                if((Q%2)==0)
                {
                    after=after-R;
                }
                else
                {
                   if(5-R==5)
                   {
                     after=after;
                   }
                   else after=after+(5-R);
                }

                       return Double.parseDouble(str.substring(0,pos+1).concat(String.valueOf(after))));

            }
0
4

seems like you are hit by integer arithmetic: in some languages (int)/(int) will always be evaluated as integer arithmetic. in order to force floating-point arithmetic, make sure that at least one of the operands is non-integer:

double roundOff = Math.round(a*100)/100.f;
2
  • with double roundOff = Math.round(a*100F)/100.f; the output is even more messed up. it is: 123.13999938964844 Jul 28 '12 at 13:32
  • are you interested in printing the rounded number or in evaluating the rounded number (to do something with it)? if it is only printing, you should look up the documentation for println. if you are interested in the numbers, then i guess (without actually having confirmed) that the "messed" up output is actually correct, as it is the closes floating-point equivalent to "123.14" (check this)
    – umläute
    Jul 28 '12 at 13:47
2

I just modified your code. It works fine in my system. See if this helps

class round{
    public static void main(String args[]){

    double a = 123.13698;
    double roundOff = Math.round(a*100)/100.00;

    System.out.println(roundOff);
}
}
-4
public static float roundFloat(float in) {
    return ((int)((in*100f)+0.5f))/100f;
}

Should be ok for most cases. You can still changes types if you want to be compliant with doubles for instance.

0

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